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Full text of "Pacific Outlook (Jan.-June 1908)"



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CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY 

SACRAMENTO 



This book is due on the last date stamped 
below. Books may not be renewed. 




85 38175 



L..A-g.u. .cut.™,. ALONG THE BARBARY COAST 



Jununry •*. 1908 





I 



SINGLE COPY 10 CENTS 



BY THE YEAR $ 2°° 



Record Smashing Sale 

Old Records to be Smashed. New Records to be Made. 

An aggressive policy has marked this business from its 
inception. We've made broad sweeping promises and 
fulfilled each one to the letter. We've increased our 
stocks, our space and our business. Progress is. our 
watchword, and the dawning of 1908 finds The Fifth 
Street Store better organized, and better equipped than 
ever to handle a constantly and rapidly increasing busi- 
ness. Decks are cleared for action, and we open our 
doors Monday morning to the most tempting array of 
seasonable bargains ever offered to the purchasing public 
of Los Angeles. Bargains that will maintain and per- 
petuate the reputation of The Fifth Street Store as the 
real bargain center of Los Angeles. Every department 
comes to the front with live, pulsing, attention-compelling 
values that demand consideration. Though we're proud 
of past records we're straining every nerve to smash 
them to smithereens with future achievements. 

This is one of the four business houses on the Pacific 
Coast whose sales for 1907 exceeded those of 1906, and 
we intend and fully expect to make the sales of 1908 
overshadow those of 1907. Pluck, energy, per-sistent and 
consistent effort will accomplish the. 'feat. 




BROADWAY 



COR FITTM ST. 




I ne USE IX brand of soaps, polishes and powders is now being' 
introduced to tbe consuming public. Tbe AMERICAN NAPH- 
THA "WASHING POWDER is unexcelled for use in tbe nouse- 
boldand combined witb tbe "USE IT" SCOURING SOAP 
POWDER make tbe most formidable array of cleansers, sold under 
tbe name of tbe AMERICAN CLEANSERS, offered on tbe mar- 
ket today. Ask your grocer for tne best and insist on getting trie "USE 

II .Brand. *J Manufactured by Tne American Commercial Co., Ltd., 
Los Angeles. 



r 



MMI^ OTHM*©E 



149216 



Jt Southwestern Weekly 



George Baiter Anderson 
EDITOR* 



Lanier Bartlett 
ASSOCIATE EDITOR 



Mary Holland Klnkald 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR 



Howard Clark Gatloupm 

ADVERTISING MANAGER 



Published every Saturday at 3IS*3IQ'330 I issner Build. rig, 
Los Angeles, California, by the 

Pacific Outlook Company. 

Subscription price $2.00 a year In advance. Single copy to 
cents on all news stands. 

Fntrred ai iccond-clati matter April 5, 1007, at the potto dice at Los Angeles, 
California, under the let of Congress of March J, 1879. 

The Editor of the Pacific Outlook cannot guarantee to return manuscripts, 
though he will endeavor to do so if stamps for that purpose arc inclosed with them 
tf rour manuscript is valuable, keep a copy of it. 

Vol. 4. Los Jingeles, Cal., January 4, 1908 Mo. I 

NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS 

The Pacific Outlook is mailed to subscribers through 
the Los Angeles Post Office every Friday, and should be 
delivered in every part of the city by Saturday's post. If 
for any reason it should be delayed, or be delivered in 
poor condition, subscribers will confer a favor upon the 
publishers by giving them immediate notice. The date on 
the wrapper shows the time to which your subscription is 
paid as shown by our ledgers. No receipts will be mailed 
unless specially requested. Telephone Home F 7966. 



COMMENT 

WHICH IS THE greater evil, the "bucket shop" 
or the house of prostitution? This question is sug- 
gested by the following from a news item printed 
in the Express Monday evening: "Detectives Mur- 
ray and Cooke descended upon the alleged bucket 
shop of Thomas McGregor, 603-4 Hellman building, 
at noon today and placed four of the emploves un- 
der arrest. * * * 'These places can't exist here 
while I'm chief,' says Chief Kern. 'We'll never let 
up on them as long as they attempt to defy the law,' 

says Prosecutor Fleming." 

Bucket Shops Great ! Good for Kern and 

and Prostitution Fleming! Boldly said! That's 

the sort of talk the people 
of Los Angeles like to hear from the lips of these 
brave defenders of the city. But in the meantime, 
Mr. Kern and Mr. Fleming, how about the in- 
famous houses of prostitution which flourish under 
the protecting wing of somebody or other — in Com- 
mercial street for instance? Yes, we understand 
that the place commonly known as the "municipal 
crib" has closed its doors and pulled down its blinds, 
but that is not all that needs to be done to improve 
the mural atmosphere of that section of the town. 
There are others like this place, not one or two 
but by the dozen. 

* * * 

THE WRITER of these paragraphs ma'de a 
tour of the "red light" district the other night, after 
the notorious brick house of shame on Commercial 
street was ordered closed. It was closed, appar- 



ently. Hut flanking it on either side, and on the 
north side of the street as well, there were plenty 
of these houses open for business. Not content to 
gaze at the crimson reflections of the lights within, 
the writer entered some of these places. Others he 
did not have to enter. The inmates greeted him 
half way to the door with a smiling welcome. We 
cannot bring ourselves to tell the story just yet — 
it is too utterly disgusting. But the houses and the 
gaudy prostitutes are there, Mr. Kern and Mr. 
Fleming, and when any city authority professes its 

ignorance of the existence of this par- 

Which ticular form of vice in this quarter — 

Is Worse? well, it all depends upon whether it is 

the police department or the park or 
health departments to settle the question of whether 
it is attending to its business or not. It is all right 
for Mr. Fleming to declare that he will "never let 
up on" the bucket shops. That's good so far as it 
goes. But if Mr. Fleming — who, we understand, is 
a Christian gentleman and a good fighter, when he 
wants to fight (take the Lanterman case in evidence 
of this fact) — wants to perform a distinct service 
to the city, we would suggest to him, in all serious- 
ness, that he set the machinery of his office at work 
in the direction of the rottenness that he can un- 
cover, if he will, in the vicinity of Commercial 
street. The bucket shops are bad, we will admit; 
but the houses of prostitution that are permitted to 
flourish in great numbers all about that modest- 
looking building which was closed not long ago — 
are they bad. too ? Ugh ! 

* 9 » 

IT OUGHT TO be the easiest thing in the world 
to procure evidence that these praces are open and 
transacting business in defiance of the law. It not 
only ought to be, but it is easy to (5o so. All that 
is required is a prosecuting officer with nerve and 
due regard to the duties of his office. The police 
department, can not, dare not deny that these places 
are open everv night in the week. The law says 
they must not exist. The mayor and the chief of 
police know of them, and the mayor 
Easy to Get and the chief of police have the pow- 
Evidence er to close them. The city prose- 
cutor, likewise, has the power to 
close them and to punish, on a criminal charge, the 
proprietors and the owners of the premises where 
they are located, if we have head the law intelli- 
gently. But if these officials believe that the in- 



Pacific Outlook 



terests of the city will be best conserved by closing 
the bucket shops and letting the infamous houses 
of prostitution, with their painted females, flourish 
under the very noses of the police, and the people 
of Lcs Angeles like this sort of thing — well, nobody- 
else will have to suffer. 

* * * ' 

IT IS RIDICULOUS to contend that these hell- 
holes cannot be rooted out of the community. In 
San Francisco Mayer Taylor has proven to all the 
world that such dens of iniquity as those which 
exist in Los Angeles can be put out of existence, 
quietly, easily. If this can be accomplished in San 
Francisco, can it not be done in this city? Has the 
mayor of San Francisco greater power than the 
mayor of Los Angeles? One of the most important 
things that cntributed to the destruction of Mayor 
Schmitz was the fact that this official, in the face 
of the repeatedly expressed opposition of the better 
class of citizens, permitted these dens of vice to 
flourish under their very eyes. So flagrantly was 
the law in this respect violated that as soon as the 
people had become thoroughly aroused in the mat- 
ter they came to the conclusion that 
How Much condition of affairs was evidence of 
Longer? corruption in the ranks of the city of- 
ficials. Ruef, Schmitz and everybody 
else connected with the graft indignantly denied, 
then bluffed and blustered, then threatened. "I will 
make them all sick of their job," declared Ruef when 
the crisis had been reached. "I am innocent !" 
screamed Schmitz. But when brought to bay Ruef 
confessed his guilt; and Schmitz has been convicted. 
The temporary authorities of Los Angeles are now 
in a position where they may easily prove their 
good faith by seeing that the laws they swore to 
enforce are enforced. There is a wholesome object 
lesson in the recent history of San Francisco. Vice 
in its worst form is tolerated in Los Angeles, in 
defiance of the law. The question which the Pa- 
cific Outlook wishes -to propound to the responsible 
authorities of this city is a simple one: "How much 
longer do you intend to wink at such violations of 
the law as those to which we have pointedly re- 
ferred?" 

* * * 

AN" INCIDENT which occurred in Los Angeles 
last Saturday not only is without precedent, but it 
is doubtful if such an occurrence would have been 
possible say two years ago. The weekly luncheon 
of the City Club at Hotel Westminster was the oc- 
casion. The daily papers have described what hap- 
pened there, but it is beyond the power of any 
writer to paint with fidelity the spirit 
City Club's which pervaded the. gathering. Be- 
Festivities tween three and four hundred men 
watched the bestowal of Christmas 
presents upon most of the city officials. All but 
two or three of the recipients were present, but for 
some reason Mayor Harper and Chief of Police 



Kern failed to accept the invitation of the club's 
committee to attend. Whether either of these gen- 
tlemen feared a disagreeable contretemps may be 
left to the imagination, but whether he 'did or not 
the fact is that nothing of a disagreeable or offen- 
sive nature transpired. 

¥ * * 
THE THING which made the luncheon remark- 
able was" the club's stamp of disapproval of the 
policy of the Los Angeles Times in its campaign 
against Dr. E. C. Moore, superintendent of city 
schools. When the time for handing Dr. Moore 
his Christmas gift arrived everybody present ex- 
pected something interesting, but few anticipated 
that in a semi-public gathering, at which a large 
number of representative citizens were present, the 
Times would be made the butt of such ridicule as 
was heaped upon it in the rendering of the Christ- 
mas carol by the City Club Quartette. So long 

have the people of Los Angeles 

Times Have been dominated by this newspaper 

Changed that such a course as this on the 

part of any large organization of 
men would not have been thought of two or three 
years ago. But times have changed, and the best 
citizenship of Los Angeles has proven that it no 
longer stands in fear of the vitriol and mud flung 
by the editor of that once great newspaper. Anti- 
Otis and anti-Times demonstrations have not been 
numerous in this city in the past, but the precedent 
established by the Heney meeting last summer and 
the City Club's Christmas festivities last week in- 
dicates that the attitude of the people has changed 
from one of fear to one of independence and fear- 
lessness, so far as anything which the Times may 
do or say is concerned. 

* * * 

IAS AN ILLUSTRATION of the shameless 
depths to which a newspaper can descend when it 
allows its personal animosities to oblique its moral 
vision we refer to the Christmas edition of the 
Times. In an editorial lauding Jesus of Nazareth 
this sentence occurs: "At the end of 1900 years 
practically the whole civilized world (Dr. Moore 
notwithstanding) celebrates the birthday of this 
obscure child," etc. Only three words bracketed, 
but what a significance they have for the reader 
who has followed the details of the disgraceful at- 
tack upon Dr. Moore! They mean that not even 
the glad spirit of Christmas could lighten the bitter- 
ness of the editor's malice, and that 
Unleavened the Times is so completely obsessed 
Malice by its personal spite and hatred that 
it had to befoul its pages with its 
malignity on the holiest day of all the year. And 
what can a right-minded, reverent-hearted man 
think of a newspaper that takes the name and per- 
son of the noblest, tenderest character the human 
race has produced, whose lofty teachings have chal- 
lenged the admiration of the world's profoundest 



Pacific Outlook 



ken the hearts of 

ime i- held by untold millions in 

■ iis malcvol- 

and venom? Siirely nothing more i- needed 

to utterly discredit the times in this affair, and to 

animus of this cowardly 
me of our best and most valuable citi- 

♦ * * 

THE LINCOLN-R< M (SEVELT Republican 
League may have its hands full in the nexl cam- 
paign in California. The remarkable success which 
has attended the work of the league thus far has 
opened the eyes of the Southern Pacific political 
bureau to the fact that to retain its strangle hold 
upon the people of this state it must engage in the 
greatest fight in its career. The railroad is about 
to return to the vulgar cash basis which marked 
its political undertakings until a few years ago — not 
that the railroad has not always used money lav- 
ishly when necessary to the attainment of success, 
but that from this time forward cash will be used 
more openly and defiantly than during the past few 
years — if the stories that are 
The League and coming from Sacramento are 

the Machine trustworthy. The Sacramento 

News, a paper which seldom 
reaches this part of California, declares that "the 
political bureau believes that a great part of the 
disclaimer of the railroad's business in politics is 
inspired by a fiery desire to have then come back 
and not by any sincere affection for undefiled poli- 
tics. So it will get back to the old idea when men 
were debauched by bribery whenever they were 
needed. The decision is a direct challenge to the 
Lincoln-Roosevelt League. The idea of that or- 
ganization is in danger of spreading throughout the 
country and must be checked and throttled in its 
infancy. The bureau figures that the job will be 
neither expensive nor difficult, for it never believed 
that the public was consuming with a desire to in- 
terfere with railroad domination." 

* * * 

THE SCHEME of the Southern Pacific is said to 
include the establishment of a daily newspaper 
"which shall be avowedly and openly representative 
of the corporation interests. The bureau is con- 
vinced that it made a mistake in selling the Union, 
which is now boldly challenging its right to do poli- 
tics." The last statement which we have quoted' 
from this Sacramento paper is astonishing. It does 
not seem possible that the Southern Pacific machine 
could be brought to the point where it would admit 

having made a mistake in any of its 

Tactical political operations. But if it believes it 

Error committed a tactical error in letting go 

of the Sacramento Union, there is still 
hope that it may see its way clear to admitting 



i' err- irs in It. X" gl I 

he made by the Herrill-Hai ne at this 

time than to enter the newsp openly. \ud 

win >l i uld it ? \\ i i ) depi nd in comph : e 

security upon such papers as the Los Angeles I 
and .1 fe« other machine organs which usu 
their orders eithei From.Herrin direel "V follow 
cue of lie 'rime-, why should it waste any money 
in publishing ;■ piper which will he devoid of in- 
fluence i: .i:n the start ? 

* * * 

YET THERE is mint her side to the question, and 
perhaps the establishment of the proposed "avowed 
organ" of the 1 lerrin-1 larriman machine in Sacra- 
mento will be a good stroke after all. Everything 
depends upon whether the machine will be able to 
get some other Sacramento paper in line and keep 
it in line to the end (of the machine) or not. Its 
propaganda requires one newspaper in Los An- 
geles, one in San Francisco, one in Sacramento, be- 
sides smaller and less widely read papers in other 
cities. It is reasonably safe in 
No "Organ" in San Francisco with the Chronicle, 

Sacramento and its domination of the Times 
in what is popularly known as a 
"cinch." But unfortunately for the machine it has 
no newspaper support of any character in the state 
capital. It knows better than to approach either 
the Union or the Bee, so there appears to be left 
the single alternative of coming out into the open 
with a paper all its own, through which it can say 
what it pleases to those few people who will be fools 
enough to read and believe anything it has to say 
on political matters through the medium of any of 
the so-called "purchased" press. 

* * * 

EVERY DAY'S delay on the part of Mayor 
Harper in the matter of the reappointment of James 
N. Anderson to membership on the Board of Pub- 
lic Works, brings with it a distinct loss of public 
confidence to the mayor. The policy of temporiz- 
ing in this matter causes a suspicion that the mayor 

is determined, after all that has 

Still" Playing been said and done, to avoid reap- 

with Fire pointing Air. Anderson if possible. 

It has been suggested that the 
Harper idea is to endeavor, by dilatory tactics, to 
render the official position of Mr. Anderson as 
nearly unbearable as possible in the hope that the 
iatter will finally resign in order to make room for 
some more faithful Democratic politician. So the 
mayor may continue to play with fire. 

* * * 

IF WALTER COSBY, the man who has inau- 
gurated a fight against the Los Angeles Pacific 
Railway Company, were just a trifle more temper- 
ate in speech and less in evidence as a man aiming 



Pacific Outlook 



to settle an old score with the company, he prob- 
ably would have public opinion, more solidly with 
him. There appears to be a growing impression 
that Mr. Cosby cares more to "get square" with 
the company than to establish a definite principle 
affecting the rights of the owners of private vehicles. 
While this will not affect -the merits of the case, 
it is very apt to influence a jury, which is composed, 

after all, of human beings — and- 

Is He Trying the average man loves fair play 

to "Get Square"? and a square deal. Cosby made 

a mistake when he threatened 
the City Council Monday afternoon. The council 
has shown a disposition to do everything within 
reason to secure freer traffic on Fourth street be- 
tween Broadway and Hill and it evidently is in no 
mood to submit to bulldozing tactics. The Los An- 
geles Pacific is open to criticism for its derelictions 
in more than one particular, but this is no reason 
why it should be asked to accomplish the impos- 
sible, and, failing to do so, be sent to the peniten- 
tiary for the remainder of its natural life. We won- 
der if Mr. Cosby would willingly become a party 
to legal proceedings against the "automobile-for- 
hire men" who are violating the city ordinances by 
the score every day. 

* * * 

IT MUST BE apparent to anyone who stops to 
think of it that some of the transcontinental rail- 
roads are increasing the dangers to the traveling 
public by the wholesale discharge of their common 
laborers, and in some instances the severe cutting 
down of the actual operating forces. The roads 
claim that they are discharging laborers only so far 
as it affects new construction work ; but it seems im- ■ 
possible that their maintenance departments should 
not be somewhat affected by this sudden reduction 
in the working forces. The close scrutiny and care- 
ful maintenance of roadbed and probably of rolling 
stock also, is bound to be relaxed when the number 
of employes is reduced to the lowest possible figure 
and there is not an ample re- 
Travelers' Dangers serve of laborers to draw on 
Increased to attend to little deteriora- 

tions along the lines, which 
may be placed in the "unimportant" class for the 
time being and can "run along for a - while", but 
which, after a while of "running along", will kill 
a carload or so of helpless passengers. And such 
crews as are retained doubtless will be worked 
over-time, and so became inefficient, with disastrous 
results to trains. In some way or other the public 
will be made to pay dearly for the saving that is 
being made by the railroads. Either the dangers 
mentioned will be risked, or the number of trains 
and the running time will be so reduced as serious- 
ly to inconvenience business and put the nation 
back into the class of way-train countries. 



THE RAILROAD'S operating in California are 
just now dumping overboard thousands of Mexican 
cholos who are falling back onto local communities 
for support, and are a distinct menace to society. 
Practically all these Mexican laborers were at some 
time imported from Mexico by the railroads — or, to 
state it more exactly, were engaged on this side of 
the boundary from labor agents who circulate in 
Mexico at the instigation of the railroads and in- 
duce these foreigners, with promises of railroad 
jobs, to cross the line. Importation of labor from a 
foreign country is strictly contrary to United States 
statutes. Once in the employ of a railroad these 

peons are held practically in 

Railroads Ought bondage during the term of 

to Remove Rubbish their contract, the low wage 

paid them and the rule com- 
pelling them to trade at the company's stores, to 
which they speedily become indebted, serving to 
entangle them with their job almost inextricably. 
It is pretty generally known that most of the Pa- 
cific Electric system was constructed with Mexican 
contract labor ; and these laborers were induced 
to enter the United States in violation of the fed- 
eral contract labor law. In view of these facts the 
railroads are only granting what they should be 
compelled to grant when they promise, as they have 
done with reference to this vicinity, to transport 
the horde of Mexicans whom they have recently 
discharged back to the Mexican border. . It is the 
least they can do to relieve the community of an 
undesirable element which they themselves have 
dumped upon it. 

. A YOUNG MAN who shows himself absolutely 
lacking in shame and in the sense of obligation to 
his fellow beings at large is a menace to organized 
society and should be forcibly restrained by the 
community. This rule is applicable to such as Bar- 
bee S. Hook, if the numerous reports of his automo- 
bile speed orgies are correct, and there seems to be 
no reason to doubt their accuracy. We know as in- 
disputable facts that his machine killed a girl over 
a year ago and inflicted terrible injuries on a little 
boy within the past few weeks, and now there 
comes the report of his arrest Sunday for driving 
his big imported juggernaut across the pedestrian- 
frequented intersections of Seventh street and 

Grand avenue at a rate of twenty 
Has He the miles an hour, which criminal fool- 
Right to Kill hardiness came within a finger's 

width of costing an aged woman 
her life, she having been pulled back to safety, it is 
said, just as the front guards of the machine brushed 
her clothing. Is this young man entitled to risk 
human life on the streets of Los Angeles at his 
own free will? If not, it is time that something 
more than a fine, which it does his ample pocket- 



( 



Pacific Outlook 



7 



i no hurt to pay. should be administered t<> re- 
strain him from further menace of people who have 
a right : ion as they go aboul their busi- 

* * * 

REYNOLD E. BLIGHT, whose portrait ap- 
pears on the front cover of this issue of the Pacific 
Outlook, is one of the younger generation of men 

that is making itself felt upon the progress of g 1 

government in Los Angeles. Though not individu- 
ally identified with political undertakings, Mr. 
Blight is in a position, by reason of his association 
with the Fellowship movement in this citv, to do 

much toward the inculcation of correct 
Rings ideas in the minds of those to whom he 
True speaks every Sunday. For some time past 

acting as assistant to B. Fay Mills, since 
the latter has determined to carry his propaganda 
into other fields Mr. Blight becomes his logical sue-. 
sor. Perhaps the highest compliment that has 
been paid to Mr. Blight by those who know him 
best is to be found in the expression of one of his 
friends, uttered the other day: "Mr. Blight is sin- 
cere. What he says rings true." Those who read 
the Fellowship Magazine undoubtedly take the 
same view. Los Angeles needs more men like him. 

* * V 

COLONEL H. D. LOVELAND, by the grace of 
William F. Herriu and Governor Gillett railroad 
commissioner, has established his status. As all 
who were "wise" to the political game believed 
when the governor made the appointment, Love- 
land is an out and out Southern Pacific man. The 
label is so plain that he who runs may read. One 
of the first official acts of the now commissioner — 
the first of any importance whatever — has been to 
defend the giving of discriminating rates. He makes 
the ridiculous plea that this is necessary for the pro- 
tection of the wholesalers and jobbers. Surely. Of 
course. Nobody will deny it. That is exactly what 
the wholesalers and others who have been opposing 
Isidor Jacobs in his fight to compel the Southern 

Pacific to abide by the law claim. 
Herrin's Why shouldn't they?' Are they not 
Loveland the individuals who will profit most 

directly by the violation of the law? 
There are few who will believe that the governor 
did not know exactly where Colonel Loveland stood 
on this question before the appointment was made. 
And there is no danger whatever that during the 
remainder of his term of office the governor will do 
anything to offend, ever so slightly, the hand that 
led him to his seat in the executive chair. There 
is no hope for the people at present ; but there is a 
hope for the future. And that hope lies in the di- 
rection of the Lincoln-Roosevelt League of Repub- 
lican Clubs. If the Southern Pacific governor and 
the rest of the cabal of machine officials, all sub- 



ject to the heck and call of Boss llerrin. had the 

wits of PapagO Indians, they would get their ear 
to the ground. But they haven't and they won't. 
* * * 

IN THE VARIOUS attacks upon the billboard 
nuisance there has been one point not sufficiently 
emphasized — that is, its influence on the artistic 
sense of the community. To a comment made up- 
< n the remarkable art instinct evinced by the chil- 
dren of Italy, an Italian gentleman replied: "How 
could it be otherwise: they never go into the streets 
of our cities without looking upon works of art of 
the greatest merit. They are educated uncon- 
sciously." How about the children of Los Angeles? 
Will the remarkable manikin who advertises 
clothes teach them the proportions of the "human 
form divine?" Will the real estate landscape cul- 
tivate their eye for perspective? 
Our Crime Will the dozens of grotesque, ill- 
Against Art drawn figures which meet the gaze 
on a brief ride down town, train the 
artistic sense or inspire a love for the "true and 
beautiful?" The imperinent persistency with 
which the billboard pictures invade the privacy of 
one's mind is their greatest crime. Once seen they 
are twice seen, for the mental irritation they pro- 
duce blots out the beauty of the landscape. Let the 
city establish a compulsory course of education for 
billboard artists, or else consign them all to some 
Limbo where they can associate with those people 
who plant poinsettia and bourgainvillea side by side. 
* * * 
If the stories told by the detectives who have 
been at work on the case are true, the race track and 
poker caused the downfall of Elmer E. Farnsworth, 
the bookkeeper formerly employed in Bullock's big 
store. The story of his peculations is the old one 
familiar to the police of every large city in the coun- 
try. In one respect it differs from the average tale: 
Ordinarily men who fall vicitms to the gambling 
habit steal money; intrusted to their care when it is 
relatively easy to do so. They alter figures on the 
books in their charge or they so manipulate the 
cash which passes through their 
Criminals hands as to enable them to pil- 

Great and Small fer in small amounts at a time. 
But in the case of Farnsworth 
we are told that he went to the extremity of robbing 
the safe after he had learned the combination by 
stealth. In all probability Farnsworth will be made 
to suffer severely for his alleged crime. In the 
meantime the men who have been systematically 
robbing the people of the state of California and of 
the nation, through wholesale violations of the law 
— railroad operators and oil magnates — will go scot 
free in most cases. But this is the way of the 
world. It is easy enough to get the small criminal 
•luit next to impossible to put the wealthy thief be- 
hind the bars. 



Pacific Outlook 



WHAT IS a machine politician? Many defini- 
tions have been given. We all know what he is, 
but it is doubtful if an}' one has ever given the 
world a better definition of this creature than Mac- 
aulay, who wrote : "He catches without effort the 
tone of the sect or party with which he chances to 
mingle. He discerns the signs of the times with a 
sagacity with which an Indian follows a track 
through the woods. But in one so trained we sel- 
dom find integrity, constancy, or any of the virtues 
of the noble family of Truth. He 
The Machine has no faith in any doctrine, no zeal 

Politician for any cause. He sneers alike at 
those who are anxious to preserve 
and those who are eager to reform. There is noth- 
ing which he would not, without a scruple or a 
blush, join in defending or in destroying. Fidelity 
to opinions and to friends seems to him mere dull- 
ness and . wrong-headedness. Politics he regards 
not as a science of which the object is the happi- 
ness of mankind, but an exciting game of mixed 
chance and skill, at which a dexterous and lucky 
player may win." 

* * * 

THE "GAY WHITE WAY" is a fine old way— 
for a while. But for many a handsome youth from 
the virginal West it leads to the reputation scrap 
heap. L. Douglas Sovereign, formerly one of the 
newspaper goodfellows of these ' green pastures 
heerabouts, says the West looks very desirable to 
him and that the simple life of Los Angeles hence- 
forth will suit him very nicely, thank you. The 
thrilling story of "Sov's" adventures up and down 
Broadway, N. Y., hardly could be encompassed 
here ; but the chief entanglement was with some 
stage folk (She was a very striking looking blonde, 
we are told) who tried to make an angel of him. 

A theatrical angel, that is, for just 
Adventures on then "Sov" had sufficient where- 
the Gay Way withall to light up a theatrical 

production that would shine with 
a shining light even in the white glare of the Gay 
Way. But when he began to reconsider the mat- 
ter and his wings failed to sprout fast enough to 
bear up the load that had been planned for them 
these wily disciples of the precipitous life set a 
nasty trap for our descending angel to alight in. 
In short, they tried to blackmail him, wherefore all 
these reports of the wanton conduct of one, Leo D. 
Sovereign, which the longest leased wires recently 
flashed us from Broadway, N. Y. So says "Sov". 
And he says further: "No more for mine". Thus 
endeth one more lesson of the Gay White Way. 

* * * 
ANNOUNCEMENT THAT IN an effort to ex- 
press her joy over a Christmas gift a Los Angeles 
girl hugged her mother until two ribs were broken 
probably will give cold blooded persons who are 
undemonstrative a chance to point a moral. The 



girl whose caress proved so painful, however, has 
the sympathy of all who hold gratitude as one of 
the cardinal virtues. It is explained that the girl 
is athletic and enthusiastic. Therefore, she was not 
to blame. The accident merely shows how neces- 
sary it is for parents of up-to-date girls to go into 
training themselves so as to be in "form" for the 
natural ebullitions of affection. Fathers and mothers 
who have been enjoying the vacation visits of col- 
lege girls and boys doubtless will be glad to take 

a well earned rest next week. 

Bone Cracking This hewer generation is a strenu- 

Gratitude ous one and merely to look on, 

from the paternal or maternal 
point of view, is more or less fatiguing. While it 
must be acknowledged that the midwinter holidays 
appear to reveal a greater accumulation of physical 
strength than mental energy, fathers and mothers 
should not be discouraged. The strength that can 
break two ribs in an effort to reveal the thankful- 
ness of a young heart is likely to accomplish some- 
thing worth while by and by when it is directed 
in practical channels. It behooves the parents of 
today to exercise so that they will be in "condition". 
H it is "sharper than a serpent's tooth" to have "a 
thankless child," how much better is it to feel a 
few cracks in one's bones and have a thankful 
daughter ! 

* * * 

TWENTY-FIVE CENTS the round trip to 
Lucky Baldwin's infamous race track at Arcadia, 
but always fifty cents to the beaches ! The inter- 
urban electric lines say they cannot afford to carry 
the steady year-round travel between Los Angeles 
and the beaches, which in the summer time reaches 
a bulk truly enormous, for less than. half a dollar a 
head for transient round trip fares, and yet the 
hundred days' horse racing out at Arcadia is fos- 
tered, and, in fact, its success made possible, by the 
granting of a twenty-five cent round trip transient 
fare. Thus are the patrons of the brief-seasoned 
Baldwin hellhole favored, and that vast majority of 
the public that keeps the electric lines alive by its 
immense regular patronage is never accorded a 

nickel's concession, sum- 
Racetrack, a Quarter, mer or winter, workday or 
Beaches, Fifty Cents holiday, on an exhorbitant 

transient rate. It is true 
that the distance is more to the coast resorts than 
to the Santa Anita racetrack, but the volume of an- 
nual travel to the regularly-established recreation 
places must be so enormously greater than the total 
of the hundred days movement of gamblers to the 
foothills that the increased distance can hardly be 
of sufficient moment to excuse the discrimination 
between the permanent beach trade and the transi- 
tory patronage of horsey society. A fifty-cent rate 
makes frequent "patronage of the beaches prohibi- 
tory to a class which is the most in need of such 



Pacific Outlook 



thful recreation as is to be Found on the sea- 
i there i- no doubt that a lowering of the 
i fare would increase the travel tremendously. 
» ♦ * 
THERE ARE GRAFTERS in every trade and 
profession, even in that of hunk publishing. Km 
these "special" concerns were organized for that 
purpose to catch the trade of pretentious "authors" 
whose efforts have been declined, without thanks. 
by the reputable publishing houses. Their system 
is more deadly than the slot-machine. For ex- 
ample: a budding writer will forward his manu- 
script. In a few weeks the manager of the concern 
writes the author that the hook would no douht he- 
come one of the seven best sellers, as "our literary 
editor has reported favorably upon the MS." The 
author now sees Fame and Fortune knocking at 
his door, lie continues, and his hopes are crushed 
when he reads "but we only publish books on the 
co-operative plan. You must pay half the expenses, 

which, for your part, will be $500. We 

Publishing will reserve ( '0 per cent, of the sale of 

Grafters the book, and pay you a royalty of ten 

per cent." Such a one-sided proposi- 
tion was made to a writer in this city. When he 
had sufficiently recovered from the effects of this 
bold attempt at a hold up, he figured that the cost 
of publication of such a volume in Los Angeles 
would be about $300. The publishing house would, 
therefore, make a profit of $150, and then retain 90 
per cent, on all books sold. When manuscripts 
come to these fourth-rate publishers they know, 
instinctively, that they have been refused publica- 
tion by the first-class publishing houses, and they 
demand about as much as they think the supposed 
victim will bear. As there is no other resource, 
most of the writers stand the "hold up," and the 
country is flooded with yellow novels, thus further 
weakening the sensibilities of the feeble-minded. 
There are slot-machine publishing houses in New 
York, Boston, Washington city, and in Chicago. 
They are largely responsible for corrupting the pub- 
lic taste and pandering to that which is too debased 
to be corrupted. 

* * * 

CHristmas Carol 

Dedicated to Dr. E. C. Moore, Superintendent of 
Citv Schools, and Sung at the Christmas Luncheon of 
the City Club. 

Hull! The Otis siren sings, 

"It is time I clipped Moore's wings 

Mercy scant and mercy mild 

1 will show tliis wilful child. 

lie has dared to criticise 

What my pen proclaimed as wise. 

Let the Otis eagle roar. 

While I gaff Professor Moore." 

"I Inh ! To even think that he 
I lad tlic nerve t< > scrap with me: 
Dared to try to tread upon 
Me. who crossed the Rubicon!' 
I have got it in I'm- him. 
I will rend him limb from limb, 
1 [ang his hide upon my door. 
You're my meat, Professor Moore." 
Huh! ! 



Meyer Lissner, the Napoleon of Politics 




Now youT-long-distance eyeglass don 
And gaze on this Napoleon 
Of- politics, whose dome of thought 
With wise sagacity is fraught. 
Behold his nohle poise and mien. 
The fear and dread of 'he "machine". 
Write 'gainst his name this caution true: 
"He's never met his Waterloo." 

(The above is a halftone engraving made from a por- 
trait of Meyer Lissner presented to him at the meeting 
of the 'City Club last week. Those who have watched 
the career of Mr. Lissner. one of the most useful citizens 
nf Los Angeles and the heait and soul of the movement. 
for good government in this city, will agree with the 
sentiment expressed in the lines underneath the portrait.) 

9 * ¥ 

WHAT NOTED PEOPLE SAY 

Remember This! 

Lewis Nixon, Naval Architect 
The American people are to blame. They al- 
ways have two howls so far as the Navy is con- 
cerned. First, they howl at the size of every pro- 
posed naval appropriation, and have it cut down: 
and later they howl because the new ships, built 
under severe limitations, are not what might have 



10 



Pacific Outlook 



been constructed if the people, through Congress, 
had not tied the hands of the Department. 

Seventeen years ago, when we built the ships of 
the Indiana class', the old idea of coast-line battle- 
ships still prevailed. Congress tried to limit- us to 
ships with coal capacity of 400 tons. I realized that 
was not enough. Ships must be built to go to sea. 
If they are going to fight, they must be efficient to 
get to the fight on time, and they can't depend on 
colliers. So we gave to those ships a coal capacity 
of 1,850 tons. Of course, that coal loaded them 
down and sunk the armor belt way below where it 
should have been. . . . 

If the Department had. had money, the present 
faults would not exist. When the Department is 
freed from financial restrictions, the Navy will ap- 
proach much nearer to a state of perfection. 

As it is, I believe that our boats are superior to 
those of any other nation in the world. I believe 
that we could whip any other nation on the sea. 
When I say that I have both our men and our ships 
under consideration. 



Woman's Work 
President Elliott, of Harvard 
Higher education in the future should recognize 
the fact that the majority of women take up the 
occupation of training children, the married ones as 
mothers and many of the unmarried ones in the in- 
terest of mothers. Training children is the normal 
occupation of woman, and its importance in educa- 
tion has probably not been recognized because it 
has hitherto been regarded as an intellecutal pur- 
suit. Yet it is the most intellectual occupation in 
the world, in no matter what walk of life. It .calls 
always for great moral and carefully trained mental 
powers. What a great power a reading mother has 
to train the minds of her children ! This normal 
occupation of woman should be the main object 
henceforth in the education of women, and no 
longer should her education be a mere imitation of 
that of the man. On such a basis I believe higher 
education will truly perfect the home life and house- 
hold joy. It is certainly not the chief end of a 
woman's life to enter man's occupation, as was in- 
tended when higher education was advocated for 
her. It is high time that that idea of an education 
for her was abandoned, and that the aim. should be 
to develop in woman the capacity and the powers 
that fit her to make life fuller of intellectual enjoy- 
ment and happiness, more productive, physically, 
mentally, and spiritually. 



What Panic Has Taught 

Secretary Cortei.you 
We have learned some things by experience, re- 
cently by a very trying experience for many. Ex- 
perience is of value to us only as we profit by it. 
Let us hope, then, that in what we have just been 
through we have all had that kind of experience. 
Among other things we have learned what it means 
to stand steady in times of storm and stress. We 
have learned, too, more fully, perhaps, than hereto- 
fore, the value of credit in the business world, and 
have had brought home to us anew the fact that 
it is a most delicate part of a mtost delicate mechan- 
ism. We have learned where weak places were, 
where improper practices obtained. We have 



learned again the value of co-operation. In some 
directions what was weak has been strengthened, 
and, what is all important, if anv man has not 
guilty of a violation of trust that makes him amend- 
able to the law, we may feel confident that its pro- 
cesses, in orderly manner and regardless of sensa- 
tional incitement for or against him, will be evoked 
in the. interest of the public. 



Evils of Congested Population 

Campbell-Bannerman, British Premier 
We have come to recognize the fact that the con- 
centration of human 'beings in dense masses is a 
state of things which is contrary to nature, and 
that unless powerful agencies are introduced, the 
issue is found to be the suffering and gradual de- 
struction of the mass of the population. And why? 
The answer is, that when the powers of the air 
and the soil are not equal to the task that is put 
upon them, the air and the soil will avenge them- 
selves. Here and elsewhere today you have the 
spectacle of countless thousands of our fellow-men, 
and in still larger numbers of children, who are 
starved of air and space and sunshine, and therefore 
of the very elements which make a healthy and 
happy life possible. This view of it is so terrible 
that it can not toe put away. What are our wealth, 
our learning, and the finest fruits of our civilization, 
our constitution, and our political theories — what 
are these but dust and ashes, if the men and women, 
on whose labor the whole social fabric is main- 
tained, are doomed to live and die in darkness and 
misery in the areas of our great cities? 

* * * 

Complete tHe Roosevelt Prog'ram 

The intervening of a Presidential election, with 
its diverting incidents, ought not to obscure the 
country's perception of the main points of policy 
that it is the business of the present Congress to 
deal with. The railroads should have protection as 
well as regulation ; they should know their rights 
as well as their duties ; they should be made to serve 
the public faithfully and efficiently, and they should 
be allowed to earn good returns upon their invest- 
ments and their efforts as business organizations. 
The completion of Mr. Roosevelt's railroad policy 
at the present time ought to give stable equilibrium 
to the railroad situation for a generation to come. 
Again, as respects the big industrial corporations, 
Mr. Roosevelt has shown that the law is supreme, 
and everybody is now ready to admit it. But al- 
though the authority of law is vindicated, the 
statute provisions of law have shown to be very 
inadequate, and to some extent absurd and unjust. 
Mr. Roosevelt lays down a policy for the changing 
of the statutes and for the better administration of 
the law. In its main outline this policy is right and 
wise. The great businesses of this country are 
legitimate in their commercial motives and in their 
general lines of conduct. The large way of doing 
business has come to stay. But these enterprises 
have to be subject to legal regulation, and they can- 
not be properly supervised by the individual States. 
The working out of actual legislation may prove 
difficult, but it is not impossible, and the Sixtieth 
Congress ought to undertake it and see it through. 
— Review of Reviews. 



Pacific Outlook 



11 



rlbary Co^stt 



By LANIER BARTLETT 



I 



"The Gib," or the "The Rock," which ever collo- 
quial term you care to use (bu1 you must use o 
or the i tier if you would be accepted thereabouts 
as a seasoned traveler), is all you expected it to 
lie — grand, grim, gray, a thing sufficient unto itself, 
a promontory incomparable. And the Barbary 
intry, over across the way, is more than 
\nu expected it to be; not a land incomparable, 
perhaps, but to be compared only with the other 
grandest stretch the earth exhibits — this very Cali- 
fornia of our own. 

The North African stretch is not equal to our 
Western American reaches in all ways, but it is 
grand and productive in the same large, rugged, 
frank way. Bold and blue are the skies thereof, 
and the stars diamond-lighted, and the color of 
things ardent, and the distances fanciful, imibuded 
with imaginings. 

Of "The Gib" and the Barbary States you natu- 
rally think in the same thought; for, though this 
upthrust thing without an equal, without a brother 
anywhere, is in Europe, its spirit is African. White 
men dominate it now, riding in thousands on its 
sloping back, but the shadow of the Moor is cast 
forever across its countenance, and even in the flesh 
he is still seen in picturesque array throughout 
Gibraltar town. Across in Algeria there is another 
city builded on a rock that you could call Gib- 
raltar's relative if it looked on the sea. Nature has 
denied it the command of a mighty water gate; but 
white men have overwhelmed it, anyway, to hold a 
great valley and the desert with, and it is less 
mighty than the Rock of Rocks only for lack of a 
sea to dominate. 

But let Constantine wait. You will visit Tan- 
gier first. And before you do this you will have 
experienced the wonder of sailing into the Strait 
of Gibraltar. It is no mean thing to awake with 
Europe on one hand and Africa on the other; it is 
a lasting impression after day upon day of deep sea 
mystery, and only the New World to your knowl- 
edge, to slip suddenly clown the throat of the Old. 
the two continents where the Past has had its most 
spectacular setting closing on you mile by mile 
like giant jaws. Away yonder behind the gray- 
visaged Rock pulsates the heart-sea of civilization 
called the Mediterranean: and streaming ceaselessly 
in and out is the life blood of nations, the commerce 
of the organized world. Great steamers and small, 
winged craft of long flight and of short; stately 
liners, human freighted; plodding cargo bearers that 
wind their log-lines around the earth, dingy little 
coasters staggering from shelter to shelter, grace- 
ful barks with men laid out from ti pto tip of every 
yardarm trimming the sails to the first bluster of 
the open sea; fragrant 'lemon carriers from Sicily 
to the British Isles, and grimy colliers from the 
Isles to Latin ports; troopships bound homeward 
from Suez and the tropics ; sneakish Barbary feluc- 
cahs, smaller counterparts of the pirate boats of 
old; slender torpedo boats firisking out from the 
shawod of The Gib, and sometimes a massive bat- 



tleship wading deliberately along- through the col- 
umns of the busy workers — such is the throng at 
the gate of the Mediterranean, where the sailors of 
all ports and the ships of all the seven seas meet, and 
pas>, and scatter again. 

\s soon as yam are within the great Watergate 
of Gibraltar town you begin to wonder about and 
long for Tangier. The call of Africa, inarticulate 
hut nevertheless heard in the heart, is sounded to 
you at every glimpse you catch of the swathed and 
swaddle-headed Moor who glides up and down the 
steep streets, shunned and shunning, merely a tol- 
erated nuisance where once he reigned supreme. 




A Type of the Brunette Land 

But wdiether outcast or ruler, his dignity always is 
the same, it is through this silent-footed, imper- 
lurable dignity that you first feel the charm of him 
and are irresistably impelled to follow him back 
into his own land, his last refuge, though he and 
that whole land of his hate you with an immortal 
hate. Glimpses of coal black, red-turbaned Sou- 
danese and ruddy, draped Kabyles from the Atlas 
wilds will still further quicken your desire to cross 
the Strait, and you will begin to cast about for the 
Water Gate again, almost forgetting to climb the 
Rock, or explore its recesses, or — perhaps, best of 



12 



Pacific Outlook 



all — to charter one of those inimitable yellow little 
ponj r carriages that wend about among the cliff 
dwellings and ride out toward the Neutral Ground 
at sunset to see the Spanish laborers and loafers — 
men, women and children — go trooping back to 
Spain. For none of these may linger in the British 
zone 'twixt the setting and the rising of the sun. 
All but British subjects and licensed visitors (you 
will have received your three-day permit at the 
Water Gate en landing', after declaring your na- 
tionality and purpose) must follow beyond the 
Rock. Out from the walls and down the broad ave- 
nue swarms the horde of the Denied, a rabble like 
an army in rout — no, more like a hopeless popula- 
tion fleeing from a capitulating- stronghold, for there 
are the women and children cluttering the feet of 
the men. The rout continues from the walls to the 
Britis'h outpost lines, on through the stiff-backed 
English pickets into the lonely Neutral Ground, 




A Tangifr Politician 

where nation has pledged nation that never a foot 
shall tarry, and still on through the slouching pick- 
ets of Spain to "Spanishtown," as the nearest set- 
tlement over the Spanish line is known on the 
Anglo-Saxon side. A great rabble, it seems, mixed 
with mule and donkey plunder-loads, and yet it 
is a rabble of pygmies once you glance upward 
pud down again, for the actual face of the monster 
Rock — the face you see pictured wherever giant 
strength is implied — looks out over the scene' just 
here. 

Suddenly your coachman will out with his whip 
and send the pony scurrying back through the thick 
of the throng (let the outcasts escape his wheels as 
they may, for lie, an inalienable citizen of the Rock, 
despises them!) and when you clatter in through, 
the gate you find that a little longer on the outside 




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Home Phone F 5 1 78. 



Pacific Outlook 



13 



Id have meant the outside d r the night, for ;it 

the fall of ilark il -n;i|> to and of coming 

in . ■ it there is neither until the dawn. Tc 

it would seem a slavish tiling thus to be im- 

mured every nipfit "i" your life; yet that coachman 

urs is a native of The Gib who most likely in 

formed you that he never had ventured off the 

Ri ck even into Spain, and hoped he never would. 

im old charmer. Gibraltar — Gib-el-Tarik of 

the banished Moor! Even this scrawny mongrel 

race that the lowest contact of two civilizations has 

luced in thy modern settlement, feels thy flint) 

fascination ! 

The next day, Tangier. Tangier, the second old- 
is; living city in the world, the Tingis that was the 
ancient Roman capital of Western Mauritania — 
the landing place of the balk of that vast Moorish 
ulation that Ferdinand and Isabella uprooted 
from the soil of Spain and cast into the Mediter- 
ranean — the Strangest, wildest, craziest, foulest (by 




A Low Caste Moor 

sunlight) and most fascinating (by moonlight) city 
of Mohammedan Africa — Tangier the unforgetable. 
Tangier — but let it suffice that it is just Tangier. 
If the wild glory of that barbarian citv at sunset. 
with its white and pink and blue flat-topped houses. 
and the shimmering mosaic of the Sultan's minaret, 
and the dark, crumbling castle called the Kasbah, 
and some palms and some ghostly shrouded figures 
mixed with the housetops, all heaped up the crested 
hillside, all thrown up against the yellow western 
sky — if this does not burn into your memory a life 
long impression, then you are not worth the price 
that frantic nigger down there by the ship's side is 
howling up at you as his cut-rate fare to the shore. 
Or if the din that those hundred other niggers and 
Moors and Arabs and Kabyles and unclassified 
humans are causing in announcing to you their own 
special cut-rates, ever ceases echoing in your ears, 



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14 



Pacific Outlook 



then surely you will have grown memory-deaf. The 
process of getting landed in Morocco is something 
memorable. 

Tangier and- its mysterious life afford a subject 
too infinitely varied to allow of description in a 
mere sketch. From the moment that you straddle 
a miniature donkey, and with a runner beating the 
beast behind and a courier bawling a way for you 
in front through the similar traffic that jams the 
narrow, writhing Rue de les Cretians, the fascina- 
tion of an- entirely new life seizes you — a life new 
to you, but gray-old compared to the life of your 
kind. This Street of the Christians threads the 
weird, pestilential city from the landing to its 
pulsating heart ; and thereafter it is for each trav- 
eler to see what always is seen, and what usually 
is unseen, if the can, according to the wisdom and 
influence of his courier and the impression he him- 
self may make on this wily African. There 
is nothing more striking than to see the Governor 
administering justice in the open portico of the 
"Hall of Justice" — His Excellency seated cross- 
legged on a cushion, surrounded by his advisers, 
and the poor devils of prisoners being dragged be- 
fore him from the filthy prison across the way; 




With His Face Toward Mbcca 

And, leaning out of your window some warm even- 
ing about sunset, looking up at the crumbling Kas- 
bah rising naked against the blaze in the west, to 
catch with tfhe ear the brassy note of a barbarian's 
bugle, lose it somewhere over in the sunset — catch 
another, follow the direction of the sound with the 
eye until you glimpse t';e tasseled red fezes, loose 
red jackets,' blue knee breeches and bare legs of 
black Moroccan soldiers swinging down the hill 
among the white houses, twisting, turning, appear- 
ing, disappearing, finally to burst full into your 
vision from some darkening street and swarm by 
to the rhythm of the stirring march from the African 
opera, "Aida," blown from the throats of four Afri- 
can trumpets — this alone makes Tangier worth 
while. Thenceforth "Aida" will have a new mean- 
ing to you, and that old entrance-march will thrill 
you whenever you hear it ; for you have seen the 
very Aida herself, all aglow against the African 
sundown, gazing from 'her housetop onto dark bar- 
barians marching, not in mockery, but to war, to 
the thrill of that same brassy challenge of the opera 



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314 W. Third Street 



Pacific Outlook 



15 



je. It is tin- favorite marching tune of the Sul- 
tan's army, and rings through the echoing streets 
.■I rangier by day and by night. 

To visit the native coffee houses, where weird 
music from strange, brigandish-Iooking musicians 
squatted on the mat whines and beats incessantly, 
and the dancing cafes, where it is not well to go 
foung, are night experiences impossible in the 
Western world. You will go well attended, unless 
foolishly ignore the advice of those who know 
whereof thev speak. Tangier by night is even less 
civilized than it is by day. The trusted guides and 
servants of the hotel arc your best reliance and if 
your bounty is properly distributed, they will take 
cue of you — and, alas for your pocket, of all 
their friends whose places you enter. But in money 
alone we trust, in Morocco. A figure in your escort 
that will ever remain an indelible memory will be 
the lantern bearer, the lighter of the foul, untrust- 
worthy way — probably an old and otherwise useless 
man. guant. shrouded, stooped, plodding on ahead 
with a staff, swinging the huge, ancient patterned 
light-cage over the muckiest street bogs and the 
smelliest pools as a warning to the party at his 
heels: shuffling on again, muttering prayers and 
exhorcisions as his ghoulish light discovers a crum- 
pled, raving beggar tumbled against a wall like a 
fallen bundle of rags, and starting back, trembling 
a. d begging off when be stumbles around a black 
corner suddenly face to face with some muffled, 
gliding, mysterious prowler. The old fellow keeps 
on ahead only because a blow would be his re- 
minder should he lag; but much rather would he let 
his light so shine in the very center of his party that 
all persons evilly disposed toward him might see 
and take warning that Mohammed the lantern 
bearer was well protected. 

The old palace of the Sultan's — for here on. the 
coast the rulers of Morocco formerly 'had their 
capital — is architecturally interesting, presenting a 
good example of the exquisite old-time Moorish 
style of ornamentation. The sultans no longer trust 
themselves so near the commanding guns of the 
warships of covetous Christian Europe; but in the 
old palace his emissaries are lodged when they are 
sent from Fez to the coast to treat with the foreign 
representatives. For as the Sultan is afraid of the 
coast, so are the European diplomats shy of the 
interior; therefore Tangier contains all the legations 
and really is the capital so far as foreign relations' 
are concerned. 

Although the writer left Tangier almost three 
months before the anti-French (really anti-Chris- 
tian) outbreak at Casa Bianca that precipitated 
trouble which it will take a long time to settle, signs 
of uneasiness were readily discernible even in this 
most frequented port. Most of the foreign legation 
houses are on a high bit of ground behind the Kas- 
bah, outside the native part of town-. On this hill 
was camped a strong bod)' of the Sultan's 
troops, and in front of each legation house a de- 
tachment was stationed on guard. At the hotel 
inside the city walls the doorkeeper and his guard 
of trusted native porters were very wary, very cir- 
cumspect as to who should enter the edifice, and at 
7 p. m. the doors were bolted, and only white per- 
sons could pass the keeper. The picturesque native 
soldiery was constantly moving through the citv 
and to and fronn the interior. A large French 
cruiser lay in the harbor and a portion of the crew 
was held constantly in readiness for an emergency. 



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lo 



Pacific Outlook 



The harbor never is without a European guard 
ship. 

A clay's trip into the country back of Tangier, 
along the Fez road (an experiment which it would 
be unwise to attempt now) is a revelation to him 
who enters into a trip along the top of the Barbary 
States expecting to travel largely through a desert. 
Instead, this costal region is splendidly produc- 
tive, and in the springtime it has that boun- 
teous, rolling green look — that velvety green, 
flower-embroidered look that makes California 
so glorious after the winter rains. As the 
Californian travels on into Algeria and western 
Tunisia he will more and more delight in the land, 
and pronounce it exceeding fine, being so much in 
the fashion of his own. The people he will find 
very different, but in the barley-planted valleys, 
the rolling, flowered hills and the uplifted peaks 
topped with snow he recognizes a friendland. 
Though the white, flat-topped towns, with their peo- 
ple on the housetops at sunset scanning the coming 
night, do remind him of an ancient people who live 
near him at honne, over in the also very old little 
white cities of New Mexico, where the Indian folk 
stand up against the sky at evening much after this 
style. 

The poppies, with their flaunting glory, will find 
the passion in him, if he have any, for instead of 
mellow gold they. are wanton red — Oh, so red! — 
red with all the blood and passion, the hot love and 
hotter hate that their historic soil has absorbed with 
the fiery centuries of its man-ridden women-stirred 
past. 

From the Atlantic to Egypt these symbols of 
the land's life blaze hotly across hills and plains 
and flame even among the planted crops ; and round 
pbout where their immortal human counterpart, 
Cleopatra, loved and lost, they seem both the in- 
tensest, and the earliest to burn out under the 
counter heat of summer. Right well does their red 
become this brunette land. 

On issuing from Tangier southward the still im- 
posing wall that the Portuguese built about the 
city during their occupancy in the sixte.enth cen- 
turyarrests the attention and recalls the fact that the 
vicissitudes of the incredibly old town have been 
many. It has been held successively by Romans, 
Vandals, Kabyles, Moors, Portuguese, Spanish, 
English and French and Moors again. Ancient 
canon placed by the English in the sixteenth cen- 
tury to command the bay still overlook the landing, 
and are supposed to protect the port against in- 
vasion. 

One may leave Tangier in an occasional steamer 
of the German East Africa Line, which comes down 
from Hamburg and Lisbon, and coast along to Ai- 
gier, or he may be tempted away to Spain first (as 
we were) by a queer little Spanish steamier with a 
long, limpid name and go tumbling and sliding over 
the green billows in the mouth of the Strait for 
five hours, past Tarifa of piratical fame, and around 
immortal Trafalgar, finally to raise that ancient 
home port of the galleons that plyed to the Spanish 
Main of America — white little Cadiz, that dawns 1 
up out of the open sea like a mirage — filmy, unreal, 
afloat on the sea, yet immersed in the sea; onlv an 
artist's dream until suddenly the incredibly white 
city and the cathedral's dome burst into full dazzle 
under the increasing- sun. and the dreamer awakes 
to a real city three centuries older than Rome. 

From here one may work up through Spain, and 



in a night run from Madrid reach the old port of 
Cartagena, whence a French cargo steamer may be 
had every now and then for Oran, in Algeria. A 
couple of hours of daylight on the train before 
reaching Cartagena (Spain's principle orange ship- 
ping port) affords a glimpse of the fertile, almost 
tropical province of Murcia, a region strongly re- 
mindful of the horticultural portions of Southern 
California. The sail across the Mediterranean oc- 
cupies only a night, and while this seems a most 
roundabout way to reach Algeria from Morocco, 
the route has the charm of taking one into the 
tourist-free parts of southeastern Spain, and as the 
port of Oran is on the western border of Algeria, 
one obtains a view of the least Europeanized costal 
portion of the French possession and travels the 
entire width of Algeria as he works eastward to 
Tunis. 

(To be Continued.") 



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Pacific Outlook 



17 



^ 



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b 



Q 



f5h<2 tS>piritt of tHh© New Year 

By Axel Emil Gibson 

Ceaselessly onward the years are advancing, 
Leaving their marks on the tablets of time; 
Swift in the circles of hope they are dancing, 
Swung by the rhythm of ancient chyme. 

The old is retreating — 

Its mission has failed, 

The new sends its greeting 

With Destiny veiled. 

Time is a woof and its process is living 
While the years stand for patterns of weal or of woe, 
But the soul turns the loom in receiving or giving, 
In advancing or checking its powers to grow. 

And our acts in unfolding 

Our hopes or our fears, 

Are constantly molding 

Our future careers. 

In reckless abandon we imprint our notions 
As thoughts or as acts on the fabric of fame, 
And in deep-laid intrigues, or ungoverned emotions 
Are stifling the heart with sensations of same; 

And thus, while the storming 

Emotions unroll, 

Our records are forming 

On destiny's scroll. 

A thought or a word is a measureless power 
When once it i)s launched on the ocean of life. 
On its passage through time it ensouls every hour 
With the angel of peace or the demon of strife. 

But life — to be righted — 

Each man and his deeds 

Must follow united 

Where Destiny leads. 

As the patterns of life every new-year are turning, 
The man with his woof may re-set his career ; 
May apply to his life what his soul has been learning 
And advance on the new without trembling and fear, 

Rekindle the fire 

Of brotherly love 

And yearn and aspire 

For help from above. 

While the years stand for patterns of weal or of woe, 



&~ 



=9 



Q= 



4 



18 



Pacific Outlook 



Some SKetcKes from a Car Window 



By J. Sweaton Chase 



| F an Ohioan had been among the company at 
•*■ that ale-house on the Rhine of which Long- 
fellow tells in The Happiest Land, he would cer- 
tainly have put in a claim for Ohio. For indeed, it 
is an exceeding pleasant land; a land shady with 
goodly trees, and bright with soft meadows, — mea- 
dows so rich and deep that you can see the cream 
and butter lying in spots and splashes all over the 
pretty green table-cloth. (The foolish people in the 
car say that they are only patches of white and yel- 
low wild-flowers, but you need not believe it.) 
Moreover, the little towns of Ohio are clean, bright 
little towns, with desirable rose-twined cottages, 
and maple-shaded streets, and orchards plenty and 
promising; in fact, everything just as it should be, 
even to the ladders set up against the big apple- 
trees, full of red, tempting fruit; and the truant 
school-boys, stealthily creeping with their fish-poles 
through the fields. 

There is room for a few more people in Nebraska. 
Here and there is a band of a score or so of super- 
naturally fat cattle, gazing helplessly out over ten 
thousand acres of riotous pasturage, and every few 
miles there is a square-inch or two of plowed 
ground, of that rich, red color that shows that the 
juices and blood of the earth are there. The pa- 
tient land has an air of anxiously expecting the 
long-delayed attack ; seems to cry aloud "Husband- 
man, husbandman, come and plow me up; harrow 
me; tear off my pleasant green skin; do whatever 
you like to me, only do something ; and I, in return 
will bring forth for you all the kindly fruits of the 
earth." Hardy husbandman, dwelling in little, new, 
red-andi-white cottage on square-inch aforesaid, 
gazes shrewdly out to north, south, east and west, 
and forthwith fences in for himself a generous por- 
tion. And -here, at a wayside station, lies a carload 
of brand-new machinery, — gang-plows, harvesters, 
and so forth, — the heavy artillery for the subduing 
of the earth, going in ready for the fray. Yes, room 
for more people there is, certainly, but not for more 
wild-flowers. The ground seems to have broken 
nature's bounds,' and to be spontaneously smiling up 
at the astonished heavens in one universal blossom. 

Wyoming, — land of the cowboy, real and realis- 
tic ; land of distress and dreariness to poor, frail 
Stevenson, on his emigrant way "Across the 
Plains." As it happens to me, today, an attractive 
land of cloud and shower, with clear belts of inno- 
cent, rain-washed blue in the west, in which float 
long grey rolls of cloud, looking like loose skeins of 
wool. We are crawling over the backbone of the 
biggest of Mother Earth's family of continents ; yet 
we see no mountains,' for at our eight thousand feet 
of elevation we are crossing, perhaps, a two-hun- 
dred-mile hollow between two of the vertebrae. 
The monster has lain a long time quiet, but evident- 
ly is sleeping, not dead, for the geysers show that he 
is still perspiring. See those stone-piles, looking 
exactly like Scottish cairns, that crown so many of 
the steep buttes ; they are the resting-places of In- 



dian chiefs. There lie those old Dukes of Edom, 
dispossessed of all their ancient heritage save six 
feet of earth and the immeasurable sky, making up, 
in their long leisure, their claim for damages. It is 
likely to be a heavy one, though perhaps the case 
may be argued. Be that as it may, the old braves 
showed a lordly taste in the spots they chose for 
their last wigwams. 

Sky of the bluest china-blue, frilled and embroid- 
ered with long bands of little, plumey-looking 
clouds, like rows of commas ; all else neutral-tinted. 
Leagues of grey waste ; grey earth, wind-washed up 
against grey, stunted sage-brush ; grey mountains, 
such as one would expect to find in the mioon — this 
is Nevada, and blue and grey is her livery. One 
looks for houses, and they are there, too; but they 
have turned grey, also, and are swallowed up in 
the universal color, — or rather, colorlessness. Those 
little twirls and spires of apparent smoke, here and. 
there, are not, as one might think, the comfortable 
incense of chimneys, and of the bakings of bread. 
They are, indeed, very exactly the reverse, — the fit- 
ful desert wind, listlessly tossing, in its hot hands, 
the grey desert sand. Sun and clouds, for sole 
diversion, are at their silent play of drawing 
shadow-pictures on the mountain walls. There is 
a wild-goose flying, with outstretched neck; and 
here a lizard, or a serpent, glides. along. 

It is half-past four in the morning, and not yet 
dawn. In the dim, peering light there passes be- 
fore us a stupendous and wonderful scene. We are 
creeping, slowly, as if on hands and knees, into the 
heart of the mountains. To the north, the Great 
Bear glitters keenly in the cold, still air. A faint, 
flame-like whiteness outlines the peaks in the south, 
the eerie light strangely following their ridges and 
depths. In the chaos and tumult of the changing 
shapes of the mountain-walls, they are like the sor- 
sowful, passionate tossing of the sea. And now 
the tall and stately pines pass, the noblest of the 
tree-creation, each, as it glides past, seeming to 
turn upon us a searching, stern regard ; or is it a 
question? Yes, old trees; my heart leaps up with 
longing to live with you ; to roam forever in your 
great, silent world, and be a comrade, like you, of 
Cold, and Sun, and Solitude ; of the wild, whirling 
storm and hoarse, terrible thunder; of shattering 
lightenings, and thrashing, primeval rains, and 
deadly, stifling snow. 

Distantly glint and shimmer the knotted Pleiades. 
A star burns for a moment on the high, black para- 
pet of a distant mountain, then, suddenly, is 
quenched. It is the signal of the day. 

At last, California, our 'own Sunsetland. The ex- 
ceeding beauty of it makes one sigh, with, as it 
were, an over-burden of pleasure. The heart catches 
so eagerly at each remembered enchantment that 
to pass it is almost a physical pain. There are the 
black and green mountains, laced and inlaid with 
ribbons and strips of snow; there are the pleasant 
emerald meadows; the pleasant little streams, too, 



Pacific Outlook 



19 



whiti . . here— brdwn as ale, there. Here 

are the lakes, little round lakes, little narrow lakes, 
little lakes of every possible shape, with dainty lit- 
tle white beaches laid carefully around them on 
purpose for yon to sit on and toss pebbles all day 
into the Still, steel) water. And yes. here are the 
long,' warm valleys; and the young, vigorous earth, 
like a beautiful Indian maid, is wearing her pretty 
brown dress, embroidered with green-silk thread-. 
of orchard and vine. And at last, at last, the blue, 
blue, blue Pacific ! 

* * * 

The Bible In the Schools 

Attorney General Webb has rendered an official 
opinion declaring the use of the Bible in the public 
schools to he unconstitutional. Xot only may 
teachers not use the Scriptures as a textbook, but 
they may not even read from them in any of the 
public schools of California. 

If those who took the field against Dr. E. C. 
Moore, city superintendent of schools, following the 
lead of the local newspaper which has blacklisted 
this able educator, had been familiar with the legal 
aspects of the case, in all probability there would 
have been less of abuse of him on account of his 
course in calling the attention of the city teachers 
to the constitutional provision governing their ac- 
tion during the Christmas holiday ceremonies in the 
public schools. 

In this connection it may not be amiss to quote 
.from some of the great Americans on this question 
of the union of church and state, and the popular 
fallacy that the United States is a Christian nation. 
Here is what they say : 

"The government of the United States is not on 
any sense founded on the Christian religion." — 
George Washington. 

"When a religion is good I conceive it will sup- 
port itself, and when it does not support itself, and 
God does not take care to support it, so that its pro- 
fessors are obliged to call for help of the civil power, 
'tis a sign, I apprehend, of its being a bad one." — 
Benjamin Franklin. 

"The same authority which can establish Chris- 
tianity, in exclusion of all other religions, may es- 
tablish with the same ease any particular sect of 
Christians, in exclusion of all other sects." — James 
Madison. 

"I consider the government of the United States 
as interdicted by the Constitution from intermed- 
dling with religious institutions, their doctrines, 
discipline or exercises. — It is wicked and tyrannical 
to compel any man to support a religion in which 
he does not believe." — Thomas Jefferson. 

"Leave the matter of religion to the family altar. 
the church and the private school supported entire- 
ly by private contribution. Keep the church and 
the state forever separate." — Ulysses S. Grant. 

"The man who will not investigate both sides 
of a question is dishonest." — Abraham Lincoln. 

"The divorce between church and state should be 
absolute." — James A. Garfield. 

* * * 
Octagons 

"Johnny, tell us wdiat your lesson was about to- 
day?" "About octagons," replied Johnny. "Ami 
wdiat." pursued the questioner, "is an octagon?" 
"It's a many-sided animal," piped the lad, "that 
prabs you when you go in swimming." — Xew York- 
Evening Post. 





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20 



Pacific Outlook 




SOCIETY 




The Tournament of Roses 

The new year, begun with such a delightful event 
as the Tournament of Roses, appears promising in- 
deed. Never was the annual fete in Pasadena more 
enjoyable than this year when all conditions worked 
in unison for the success of a memorable pro- 
gramme. The crowds appeared to be even greater 
than usual and the pageant was gorgeous. 

For this nineteenth annual tournament the Crown 
City was decorated with flags, pennants and palms. 
The streets presented* a kaleidoscope of color and all 
the arrangements were so perfect that there was not 
a single incident to mar the day. Miss Sutton as 
the Queen of the Tournament was most gracious 
and most picturesque. Her royal robes of purest 




Mrs. J. T. Fitzgerald 
One of the most attractive Matrons at the Second Assembly 

white were most becoming. Seated on her throne 
and accompanied by her two sisters. Miss Florence 
Sutton and Mrs. B. O. Bruce, and by the Misses 
Palmer as maids of honor she was a queen of which 
to be proud. The float upon which the party rode 
was beautifully decorated. It gave a fitting keynote 
to the floral procession. Dr. R. G. Skillen, grand, 
marshal, had the satisfaction of managing a parade 
that moved toward Tournament Park with a ma- 
chine-like smoothness which elicited cheers. 

In the afternoon the races at the park brought 
out one of the most brilliant and most distinctive 
crowds that could be found anywhere on the globe. 
Automobiles by the hundred were drawn up in line. 
Never were gayer or more becoming costumes worn 
by the women. In the evening nearly one thousand 



persons attended the ball at the Hotel Green. The 
day was one of the most delightful and most suc- 
cessful in the history of Pasadena. 

The second Assembly ball was one of the most 
delightful of the many holiday entertainments. 
Kramer's was appropriately decorated with large 
wreaths of hollv tied with immense bows of red 
ribbon. In the center of the ballroom imitation 
icicles depended from a giant wreath, while the 
lights were concealed in snowballs. The wintry ef- 
fect, reminiscent of eastern Christmases, was pleas- 
ing to the throng of dancers. Almost every one, 
young and old in the smart set was present. Debu- 
tantes and girls of last season appeared in gowns 
that were beautiful, for of course all had saved the 
handsomest costumes for the midwinter dance. 
Downstairs in the supper room the tables were or- 
namented with miniature Christmas trees and two 
big trees, brilliantly lighted, stood in a command- 
ing position. The big trees were laden with gifts. 
A novel feature of the evening was the appearance 
of six southern darkies in, livery, each lackey bear- 
ing on his head a Christmas puding. The puddings 
contained sleigh bells for the women guests and 
snow balls for the men guests. There were many 
extra dances and the ball did not end until an un- 
usually late hour. 

It is rumored that in case of the construction of 
the new Friday Morning clubhouse according to 
plans now being considered, which provide for a 
commodious ballroom in conjunction with the club 
accommodations, these quarters may be the scene 
of next year's Assembly balls. These brilliant so- 
cial events have become so largely patronized as to 
tax unduly the accommodations which are at pres- 
ent afforded them, and the fine grounds that will 
surround the new clubhouse in question, which 
would lend themselves to electrical decorations and 
to pleasant tete-a-tete seclusion for the romantically 
inclined between dances, would form an ideal set- 
ting for future Assemblies. 

The friends of Mrs. Dwight Whiting are much 
interested in the news, which has as yet hardly 
found general circulation, that she is engaged to 
marry Eyre B. French, a young man who has been 
associated with her in the management of her busi- 
ness interests. The marriage, it is said, is to take 
place in the spring. 

Mrs. E. E. Teter, No. 900 West Thirty-sixth 
street, announces the marriage of her daughter, 
Miss Emmadale Teter, and Claude Otis Henry. 
The ceremony was performed in the presence of 
members of the families of the bride and bride- 
groom, the Rev. Baker P. Lee officiating. 

The event of next week will be the Bachelors' 
ball Tuesday evening. The decorations for this 
brilliant dance will be novel and beautiful. The 
patronesses are : Mrs. I. N. Van Nuys, Mrs. Han- 
cock Banning, Mrs. Milo M. Potter, Mrs. M. A. 



Pacific Outlook 



21 



Mrs. Michael I. Connell, Mrs. William 

Garland. Mrs. Granville MacGowan, Mrs. Ran- 

h II. Miner, Mrs. Walter larvis Barlow, Mrs. 

Alfred Solano. Mrs. Frank S. Hicks, Mrs. E. A. 

Bryant. Mrs. William R. Burke and Mrs. Charles 

Munroe. The board oi governors is i 10 ed of 

Russell Tavlor, Carlton Burke, A. W. Bumiller, 
1 [an rth. ( lharles Sevier, fr., 

J. W. Wolters, I ouis Vetter, Gurnev Newlin, Ear] 
Antony, Harry I'.. Kay and Farl Cowan. 

Mr. and Mr.-. Robert Wilcox of New York arc 
guests at the Hotel Lankershim. Mrs. Wilcox — 
Ella Wheeler Wilcox, the poet — has been enter- 
tained frequently this week She was a conspicuous 
figure at the Tournament of Ruses in Pasadena 
New Year's day and received the guests at the ball 
with the Queen, Miss May Sutton. Mrs. ( ). E. Par- 
ish gave a luncheon in honor of Mrs. Wilcox Fri- 
day. Mr. and Mrs. Wilcox will remain in Los An- 
geles for three weeks as they have postponed the 
date of their trip to Hawaii until the end of the 
month. 

Mrs. S. Hall Young, wife of Dr. Young, a Presby- 
terian Missionary at Nome, Alaska, has come to 
Southern California to pass the winter. Mrs. 
Young was the first white woman to teach in Alas- 
ka and she has passed many years in the territory. 
Her children were born and reared there. The new 
mining camp of Fairbanks, in which she has been 
working recently, is four hundred miles from Val- 
dez by stage, but it has a water system, electric 
lights and most of the modern improvements that 
can be found in any growing young city. 

Miss Florence Hunter of San Francisco was the 
guest of honor Tuesday at two delightful entertain- 
ments given by Mrs. Sidney Lee Grover of Bur- 
lington avenue. Mrs. Grover gave a luncheon and 
five hundred party in the afternoon and in the even- 
ing she and Mr. Grover entertained a number of 
friends who watched the old year out with them. 
Miss Hunter, who has been the visiting Mrs. Wil- 
liam Wallace McLeod, has been much entertained 
since she came South. 

Members of the Alpha Phi Alumnae association 
of Southern California enjoyed a holiday reunion 
last Saturday at the Hotel Westmoore. Among 
those present were : Mrs. Robert J. Burdette, Mrs. 
S. T. Oliver, and the Misses Frances Alabaster of 
Pasadena. Mrs. J. C. Manning 1 , Miss Florence Foy, 
Miss Florence Wiley. Miss Villa Burke and Miss 
Mary Croswell of Los Angeles; Mrs. A. W. Tower 
of Glendale, Mrs. C. F. Atkinson and Miss Gene- 
vieve Meeker of Hollywood. 

Mrs. Ida Hancock was hostess at a theater party 
at the Belasco Saturday. Miss Katherine Mullen 
was the guest of honor and the following were en- 
tertained : Miss Mullen. Miss Cecilia Kays, Miss 
Margaret Loomis, Miss Mary Desmond, Miss Mary 
Boland, Miss Anna Grant, Miss Irene Phillips. Miss 
Eleanor Dougherty. Miss Marguerite Bell and Miss 
Mary Spaulding. Before the matinee luncheon was 
served at Christopher's. 

Miss Frances Maxson, No. 1332 tngraham street. 
gave a tea Saturday. A musical programme was 
presented by Miss Edith Pell, Miss Lucille Roberts 
and Miss Grace Allen. The guests included: Miss 
Ethel Graham, Miss Allen. Mrs. James Purcell, Mrs. 



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All odds and ends left from the season's large 
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Regardless off Cost 

Bargains will beckon you from all sections of this 
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FURS 



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also equipped with a large repairing and remodeling 
department. 

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324 South Broadway Los Angeles, Cal. 



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22 



Pacific Outlook 



W. J. Wren, Mrs. R. Arnold, Mrs. R. B. Schreter, 
Mrs. James Moore, Mrs. H. Deardoff, Miss Clair 
Allen, Miss Lucile Dixon, Miss Grace Allen, Miss 
Emmie Luentzel, Miss Alma Bradley, Miss Lulu 
Page, Miss Lucile Roberts, Miss Alice Atwell, Miss 
Nellie Beacon, Miss Violet McDonald, Miss Grace 
Rockwell, Miss Margaret Seymour, Miss Carrie 
Stutsman and Miss Helen McCutchan. 

The Entre Nous sorority, University of Califor- 
nia, will give a housewarming Saturday afternoon. 
Members of the faculty of the university will hi 
guests of honor. Miss Hazel. Hill, Miss Ethel Ho- 
gan, Miss Olive Sullivan and Miss Mabel Vale have 
charge of, the entertainment, which promises to be 
a memorable social event. The sorority is the first 
to have a home of its own and much interest is 
felt in its success. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lee Chamberlin, whose home at 
No. 401 North Vermont avenue is one of' the, pic- 
turesque suburban places, have come into the heart 
of the city for the winter. They are now at No. 40 
St. James park. Mrs. Chamberlin and her daugh- 
ter, Miss Chamberlin, one of last season's most ad- 
mired debutantes, will be at home Wednesdays. 

Mr. and Mrs. John S. Cravens of Pasadena have 
been fhe guests of honor at a number of dinners 
and other social affairs. They are planning a long 
trip through Europe. Mr. and Mrs.. Harrison I. 
Drummond gave a luncheon for them New Year's 
day and Mr. and Mrs. Charles Perkins entertained 
at a large dinner party for them in the evening. 

Miss Bessie Beatty gave an afternoon tea Mon- 
day in honor of two brides, Mrs. Preston McKinney 
and Mrs. Wesley Barr. The pretty bungalow in 
Highland Park was decorated with Christinas 
greens and the tea was an event long to be remem- 
bered by the group of'guests. 

Mr. and. Mrs. E. Velasco of Mexico returned to 
Los Angeles this week after touring Southern Cali- 
fornia. Mr. Velasco is Minister of Railways in the 
Republic of Mexico and he has been interested in 
going over the various inter-urban railways extend- 
ing from Los Angeles. 

Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Pearson of Seattle have 
come to Los Angeles to pass the winter. They have 
apartments at the Hotel Alexandria. Mr. and Mrs. 
Pearson are prominent in society in the northern 
city and have many friends in Southern California. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Botsford, No. 1213 Orange 
street, gave a dance Saturday evening in honor of 
their daughter, Miss Monimia Botsford. Members 
of Miss Botsford's sorority were guests of honor 
and there was a large attendance of college men. 

Miss Clara Olsen, private secretarv to four suc- 
cessive governors of the Territory of New Mexico, 
and at present occupying that position under Gov. 
Curry, is the guest of her sister, Mrs. C. Chaves, 
No. 121 West Thirty-first street. 

Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm Macleod entertained a 
large party of artists, musicians and society folk 
New Year's eve, when the Scotch haggis and other 
reminders of the host's native land lent novelty and 
interest to the occasion. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Letts gave an informal danc- 
ing party Monday evening in honor of their daugh- 
ters, Miss Edna Letts and Miss Gladys Letts. The 




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Next term begins January 28. Officers: J. O. Hunt, 
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Address the secretary for full information. Cor. Daly 
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Pacific O u t I o 



big house in Hollyw i was beautifully decorated 

with flowers and greens an< 1 fifty young Folk en- 
I a delightful evening. Mrs. William Lacy and 
Mr<. \\ . II. Cline in receiving the guests. 

Mi-s Edna Letts started Thursday for the boarding 
school al Millbrook, New York, which she has been 
attending since last autumn. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Lie Woolwine have as 
their house guests Mrs. Elton A. Herrick and her 
of Grand Rapids, Midi. Mrs. Herrick is a sis- 
ter of Mr. Woolwine. She will remain in Southern 
California until spring. 

Stewart Edward \\ Into, author and nature lover, 
passed several days this week in Los Angeles. Mr. 
White, whose home is in Santa Barbara, has been 
in Arizona for the purpose of gathering material 
for a new book. 

Mrs. Godfrey Holterhoffc Jr.. No. 1360 West 
Adams street, gave a dancing party Tuesday even- 



Mr-. John C. ■ 
entertain at a large 
ter-in-lav. . Mrs. \\ 
brides. 

Mr. and Mis. II 
home souk- time In 
mas holidays in Pa 

Mrs. W. G. Ke 
Tuesdaj afternoon 

street. 

Miss < iwendolen 

her cousin. Miss N 



ok 23 

• . \' i. 17 Barnard park, will 
ption in honor of her daugh 
ilton McCoy, one of the winter 

srry Clifford Lot! will start for 
March. They passed the Christ- 
ris. 

rckhoff gave a children's party 
at her home. No. 2638 Portland 

Laughlirt has as her house guest 
incv Mackintosh of London. 



* * * 
AMONG THE WOMEN'S CLUBS 

Ebell's Children's Party 

The annual children's party at the Ebell club 
house Monday was one of the most picturesque of 




A Pretty Scene in the Patio of the Ebell Club House During the Annual Children's 

Party Last Monday 



ing in honor of her daughter, Miss Leila Holterhoff, 
who is one of the debutantes of the season. 

Thomas R. Bard of Hueneme came to Los An- 
geles to pass a few days this week. The former 
United States senator met many of his friends and 
enjoyed the holiday season in Los Angeles. 

Dr. and Mrs. W. D. Babcock, No. 736 South 
Alvarado street, entertained a few intimate friends 
informally New Year's eve, when the old year was 
watched out by a merry party. 

Miss Kate Macomber passed New Year's with 
her brother and sister in law, Mr. and Mrs. John 
Kingsley Macomber, Jr., No. 1640 West Twenty- 
third street. 

Dr. and Mrs. A. P. Bliss, No. 201 West Twenty- 
second street, entertained at a holiday party in 
honor of Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Newton of Santa Bar- 
bara. 

Norwood Howard of San Francisco is visiting 
his mother, Mrs. A. J. Howard. No. 1540 Wilton 
place. 



entertainments. Three hunrded children of the 
members enjoyed the Christmas tree and welcomed 
Santa Claus. An amusing programme was present- 
ed by children in Mother Goose costume, and, after 
it, there was dancing in the big auditorium. 

Assisting Mrs. B. R. Baumgardt in preparing for 
the affair were Mrs. P. G. Hubert, the Ebell presi- 
dent : Mrs. George Kress, Mrs. Edward C. Dieter, 
Mrs. Fred Hooker Jones and Mrs. John Kahn. 
These ladies received the guests. 

The audience room was gay with Christmas 
wreaths, ropes of smilax and holly berries and Santa 
Claus was the guest of honor who came at the 
psychological moment. The fancy costumes of the 
children contributed much to the effectiveness of 
the scene. Little Bo-Peep. Boy Blue, Jack Horner, 
Contrary Mary and all the characters familiar to 
those acquainted with nursery rhymes were present 
and all were most engaging in appearance and per- 
sonality. Music for the dancing was furnished by 
Mrs. Jamison and Miss Rowley. 

The children's party was much better than any 



24 



Pacific Outlook 



affair of the older folk for the children's fete was not 
altogether selfish enjoyment. Two long tables in 
the reception room had been prepared for the gifts 
guests might bring for boys and girls less fortunate 
than those whose parents are members of the Ebell 
ciub and these tables were piled high with parcels. 
From beginning to end the children's party was 
one of the most unique and most enjoyable of holi- 
day merrymakings. 



Thursday the Department of Art and Travel of 
the Ebell discussed "Napoleonic Artists". Mrs. A. 
J. Chandler is curator of this section. 

Next Wednesday the Book Section will be enter- 
tained by a paper on "The Necessity of a Love of 
Poetry", by Mrs. L. F. Pettigrew, "The Weavers", 
by Gilbert Parker, and "Daniel Deronda", by 
George Elliot, will be reviewed by Mrs. Walter 
Lindley. Luncheon will follow. 

Monday the Parliamentary Law section will hear 
a "Lecture on Committee Work", by Mrs. J. A. Os- 
good. The curator is Mrs. J. A. Clark. 

Tuesday the Department of Expression, Mrs. 
William W. Orcutt, curator,, will listen to "Stories 
and Story Telling", followed by a talk on "Econ- 
omy of Expression". 

Thursday the Department of Shakespeare, Mrs. 
John S. Thayer, curator, will discuss "King Lear", 
Acts I and II. 

The next general meeting of the club, January 6, 
will be. for members only, and will be the semi-an- 
nual business session. A New Year's reception, 
with music, will follow. 



Friday Morning Club 

There Was much Christmas festivity last week 
at the Friday Morning Club. The programme was 
one that was entertaining and altogether enjoyable. 
Miss Anne Kavanagh gave a series of character and 
dialect readings as fine as anything that has been 
heard in Los Angeles this year. Miss Kavanagh is 
one of the few readers who has the perfect art 
which conceals art. She has magnetism and drama- 
tic power. Best of all she has a sense of humor 
that is irresistible. Her dialect is perfection and it 
is no wonder that she was recalled again and again. 
Mrs. E. S. Shank sang delightfully. The luncheon 
was a Christmas feast at which every one enjoyed 
a merry hour. 



Monday Musical Club 
Mrs. Jackson F. Gregg and Mrs. Harry Thomp- 
son entertained the members of. the Monday Musi- 
cal club this week at the home of Mrs. Gregg, No. 
148 Occidental boulevard. The programme was 
given by Miss Clara Bosbyshell, Miss Geraldine 
Thompson, Miss Mary V.. Mullens. Mrs. Anna Vir- 
ginia Metcalfe-Hecker. Miss Gertrude Cohn, Miss 
Bessie Chapin, Miss Helen Tappe, and Mr. and 
Mrs. Gregg. -Among the guests were Mesdamet 
Earl Rogers, Jirah D. Cole, Henry Metcalf, Arline 
Ellis Baker, Rogers, Charles Thompson, Miss Edith 
Chapin, Aliss Beresford Joy, and William H. Lott. 
The next meeting will take place the first Monday 
in February at the home of Mrs. Charles G. Stivers, 
No. 1115 Arapahoe street. 



day is so widely or so lovingly remembered. Ma- 
dame Severance wears her years so lightly that 
time appears not to have touched her for the last 
three decades. Endowed with a mind of extraordi- 
nary brilliancy and capacity, she has kept up with 
the times and has done more than to keep step with 
the march of progress. In all reform and philan- 
thropic movements she has been a leading thinker 
and today she has outstripped many of her contem- 
poraries. Age has not abated the enthusiasm or 
dulled the splendid intelligence of this most remark- 
able woman, who has always had the courage of 
her convictions. It is with a feeling of gratitude 
that the friends of Madame Severance rejoice over 
the safe passing of each milestone in the long and 
busy life which has been ever helpful to humanity 
and they unite in hoping that the exalted and beau- 
tiful spirit may linger long in the world which needs 
its uplifting influence. In order that the friends of 
Madame Severance may have the opportunity of 
offering their congratulations and good wishes, the 
P'riday Morning Club, of which she is president 
emeritus, will give a reception in her honor Tues- 
day, January 14. 



Mme. Severance's Birthday 
Madame Caroline M. Severance will celebrate the 
eighty-eighth anniversary of her birth January 12 
and it is safe to say that in all Los Angeles no birth" 



Suffrage and Suffragettes 

At the meeting of the Political Equality League 
last Saturday in the Woman's Club house, the presi- 
dent, Mrs. George Drake Ruddy, was in the chair. 
The constitution was revised and short addresses 
weer made by various members of the league. 

Although the subject of the invasion of the 
United States by Mrs. Boorman. Wells, the English 
"suffragette", was not discussed, it is safe to say 
that the California supporters of the political equal- 
ity movement will not approve of the methods em- 
ployed bv the aggressive women of Great Britain. 
Mrs. Wells began her campaign this week in New 
York with an open air meeting, which was held 
under the auspices of the Harlem Equal Rights 
League. It is good news that Mrs. Carrie Chap- 
man Catt and other leadinr American workers have 
declined to countenance the course of action that 
brought notoriety and ignominy on the "cause" 
in London. 

Street meetings in the middle of the winter are 
not likely to arouse enthusiasm on any subject. 
They are no more wise, or no more to be counten- 
anced than assemblages of anarchists or any other 
agitators. The campaign for political equality in 
the United States is an appeal to reason, a demand 
for simple justice. It must be conducted in the 
most dignified manner, as it has been in the past, 
from the time when Miss .Anthony and the brilliant 
band of enrlier reformers began, to ask for the ballot- 
It is to be hoped that Mrs. Catt and the American 
workers for equal suffrage may be able to do mis- 
sionary work with their English sister. 

* * * 

. " Heir to E.arldom 

Santa Claus got an early start in Los Angeles 
and began his distributions the day before Christ- 
mas by leaving the finest gift he had at the resi- 
dence of Edwin T. Earl. On that date Mr. and Mrs. 
Earl found their little family increased by the ad- 
vent of a nine-and-a-half pound boy. The fond 
father has had a busy holiday week receiving the 
felicitations of friends. 



Pacific Outlook 
UNDER THE SKYLIGHTS 



25 



Miss Coan and Her Work 

High in her Hilltop Studio, which is far removed 
from the haunts of the other artists, Helen E. Coan 
has been preparing for an exhibition, which will 
show how much this modest, earnest painter has 
grown and how well her individuality lias de- 
veloped. Before seeing the pictures the critic pauses 
to admire the workshop of the artist of most refined 
taste, the woman who understands above all things 
the value of sincerity ami simplicity. Perched on 
a hill which commands a view of miles of valley, 
stretches of mountains and glimpses of the growing 
city is the rambling house unspoiled by paint. In 
the hall a stairway that turns alluringly invites as- 
cent to the upper door. Here one finds all the 
charm of tlie Attic Studio in Cumnock hall where 
Miss Coan and her friend. Miss Regina O'Kane, 
worked so successfully. Here are a brick fireplace 
and chimney before which comfortable chairs are 
drawn. ( >n every side windows reveal lovely ex- 
panses of sky above and wonderful glimpses of the 
earth below. Hills and plains, houses and winding 
roads invite the artist to prodigious industry. How 
well Miss Coan has answered the call of the beau- 
tiful out door world is shown in pictures and 
sketches on the walls of wood, the brown tones of 
which throw out the colors used so deftly by the 
painter. 

Miss Coan will show at her exhibition a number 
of landscapes and marines that cannot fail to awak- 
en the most enthusiastic admiration. As a colorist 
this artist has a gift that is rare indeed. She knows 
how* to use her mediums with the sure touch that 
gives crispness and freshness to all her work. With 
a technique that is always satisfying and discrimina- 
tion that is a gift to be coveted, Miss Coan has a 
splendid groundwork upon which to build achieve- 
ment. That she possesses in an unusual degree 
the power to put feeling into her work is proved 
in all that she does. In composition she is especial- 
ly strong. She makes every line significant and 
there is never a superfluous stroke of her brush. 
She masses her values most effectively. One likes 
her sometimes daring use of sharp contrasts and yet 
never is there any false note or any lack of unity 
in her nictures. Harmony of line as well as har- 
mony of tone distinguish them all. 

Among the pictures that will be hung in the ex- 
hibition is a study of San Pedro which is a poetic 
and an exquisite piece of work. This is a painting 
in oil, in which color is used boldlv. Like the land- 
scape recently exhibited in the Blanchard gallery 
this reveals the artist's power to interpret nature 
with a sincerity which has lasting charm. 

Miss Coan has made a reputation by her charcoal 
and watercolor pictures, exquisite sketches in which 
the two mediums are employed with a dexterity and 
success that are delightful. Among these pictures 
are new studies of Chinatown — beautiful little bits 
of the transplanted orientalism which is passing 
away so rapidly. < >nc of these reveals the corner 
of a typical porch roof in front of which a family 
grouped for the purpose of watching the last fire- 
works of the new year celebration. This is admir- 
able in conception and development. The figures 
seen in the blaze of light tell a story. Their pose 
is characteristic and expresses much. The spirit of 



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26 



Pacific Outlook 



Chinatown has been caught in. this as in the other 
pictures which have to do with the Chinese quarter. 
The artist has a fondness for painting the night 
scenes. The glow of the lanterns in the narrow' 
streets, or the beam from a half hidden light gives 
her the keynote for a picture in which she compels 
the beholder to recognize the inscrutable character 
of the strange people who are aliens always in the 
land of refuge. 

Miss Coan has made a number of magazine illus- 
trations recently that announce her aptitude for the 
sort of interpretation which must be more or less 
marred by the printer's art. Her charcoal drawings 
have color in them, color and life. It is to be hoped 
that she will exhibit these as well as the paintings. 

In the Hilltop Studio, No. 204 North Burlington 
avenue, this artist has many pupils who are learn- 
ing designing as well as other things. Among the 
students are several young children who are accom- 
plishing much under the direction of the artist of 
high ideals and fine aspiration. 



Joseph Joseph Ray, who came to Pasadena this 
winter from Riverside where he has attracted much 
attention from tourists that enjoy good pictures, 
.will exhibit his recent work in Blanchard Hall for 
two weeks beginning January 15. Mr. Ray is a 
Philadelphian, who has studied under the best mas- 
ters. Until he came to California three years ago 
he devoted his time to illustrating and he won suc- 
cess, for he is a good draughtsman and is strong 
in composition. Since he has been able to give at- 
tention to color he has developed rapidly and his 
exhibition will be of much interest to the public. 

Carl Oscar Borg's paintings will be exhibited at 
the Woman's Club house next Tuesday. Mr. Borg 
has been most successful recently in selling his pic- 
tures and his latest work has attracted notice that 
must be encouraging to the artist. 

The Los Angeles School of Art and Design re- 
turns to work after the holidays with the following 
faculty: L. E. G. Macleod, figure and landscape; 
John H. Rich, portrait and figure; James E. Mc- 
Burney, composition ; Alexander Stirling Calder, 
sculpture; Daisy M. Hughes, antique; Dr. W. T. 
McArthur, anatomy. 

Marion Holden Pope is preparing for an exhibi- 
tion of etchings and water colors at Steckel's gal- 
lery some time in February. Mrs. Pope's work has 
a distinction and charm that place it in a class quite 
by itself. Although she is a painter of extraordin- 
ary attainments she has been known, since her mar- 
riage, as an etcher whose work has been so success- 
ful that little time has been left for the use of colors. 
In this exhibition of 1908 Mrs. Pope will show a 
number of canvases, which have the breadth, the 
simplicity and the power that mark all her work. 

Miss Vance and Miss de Laguna of the Westlake 
School for Girls are now the possessors of Norman 
St. Clair's "Early Morning in the Arroyo". The 
picture was bought by students as a gift to the prin- 
cipals. 

J. Pierpont Morgan has bought the famous Biron 
Monuments and there will be another outcry in Eu- 
rope against the purchase of art treasures by Ameri- 
can millionaires. The monuments. "The Entomb- 
ment" and "Our Lady of Pity" were erected by 
Pons de Gontaut, knight, and follower of Charles 
VIII, in the chapel of the Chateau de Biron, at the 
end of the fifteenth century. The names of the 



sculptors are unknown. Eight figures of natural 
size compose "The Entombment," which is the 
larger and more important of the two works. 

* * * 

"Willy and the Tempter 

If any one has the least doubt concerning the evil 
effects of the racing season at Santa Anita park all 
that is necessary is to keep eyes and ears open. One 
day this week a woman shopper was standing at the 
elevator on an upper floor in one of the big depart- 
ment stores on Broadway when she heard a young 
man, one of the clerks, say to a cash boy: 

"Have you any money, Billy?" 

""'Course I have," answered Billy. "Didn't I get 
two dollars for a Christmas present from the boss?" 

"Don't you want to make the $2 into $20?" in- 
quired the young man, who was an anaemic looking 
youth of about twenty-one. 

The boy drew near to the counter and uttered 
.oue_wprd in- a tone of breathless interest. "How?" 
was. the .word. 

."I'll. bet your money on the races. I know a sure 
winner on a ten to one shot. Give me your money 
and the horses will do the rest." 

"I aint got my $2 here," the boy said in an un- 
certain voice. 

"You're afraid," taunted the youn.g man. "I 
thought you were a dead game sport, Billy." 

The boy drew himself up to his entire height and 
puffed out his flat chest. 

"I'm not afraid," he protested. 

"Yes, you are. You've cold feet now. Oh, you'll 
never make a plunger," answered the clerk with a 
jeering laugh. 

Billy's freckled face became red. 

"Ma's got my money," he explained, "and I das- 
sent ask her for it, 'cause it's to help buy my new 
clothes." 

"That's too bad. Of course it doesn't cut any ice 
with me." The clerk began to fold a piece of cur- 
tain drapery — the sort women buy by the yard. "I 
wanted to see you get rich," he remarked as he put 
the material on a shelf. "Think what you could do 
with $20! Can't you get some money anywhere? 
Can't you borrow it?" 

Billy shook his head. 

"Where' d I borry it?" he asked. 

"Oh, you might get your wages in advance," 
counseled the tempter. "Tell the boss you need 
the money to buy your mother a New Year's pres- 
ent." 

Billy appeared to be impressed, but he hesitated. 
Just then the elevator stopped at the floor and the 
woman entered it. 

Did Billy "borry" the money for his first bet, or 
not? 



Orders Taken 



Home Phone E 3345 



Arts and Crafts Shop 

Mrs. C. D. Weston 

347 S. Broadway 

Hand-painted California Pillows and 
Hand-painted China 



Pacific Outlook 



27 




Almost, But Not Quite 

The basic idea of the new play, "Sham", is an 
excel lenl one. and there is considerable cleverness 
in the dialogue, though there is too much "talk". 
The motif of the work is the contrast between the 
sham life of "society" as represented in New York, 
where social distinctions have reached the most ex- 
aggerated and shameful development to be found on 
this side of the Atlantic, and the straightforward life 
of tile West, where, according to the statements of 
Tom Jaffiev, the hero of the play, the rugged, 
Strength-giving bark is still on the people, men are 
rated in community estimation by their own charac- 
ters, not by their pedigrees, and conventionalities 
are reduced to this basis: "Never shoot a man in the 
back, always respect a woman, pay your bills". If 
you will analyze these rules that are given as the 
elementals of Western ideals, not considering them 
literally merely, but developing them into their 
figurative possibilities, you will find them a pretty 
sound summing-up of the principles that make the 
life of the typical Western American such a con- 
trast to that of his countryman of the Eastern social 
centers, where life is not lived face to face, nor 
ideals respected, nor social beggary avoided, nor 
sham despised. 

An effort worth while, is "Sham", and especially 
to be appreciated by Western audiences — but let us 
take warning lest the contrast it emphasizes be- 
come almost indistinguishable in time, for social 
sham already is insinuating its dry rot into the fa- 
bric of the larger Western communities. Besides 
its worthy sentiment there are some good points 
to the play from the purely professional or artistic 
standpoint — some effective dramatic situations, 
some nice character bits, and a good many laughs. 

But with all these, the play seems hardly to reach 
the mark of real success. It is at one and the same 
time a near-comedy and a near-drama; almost one, 
not quite the other; and the confusion it causes in 
fhe mind of the spectator by its constant little short- 
comings in this direction or that — the dissatisfying 
little "almosts" born of the imperfect adjustment of 
the comic and the serious — these mar the effect of 
the whole. The ending is too abrupt. 

A handsome audience witnessed the initial pro- 
duction of "Sham" the evening of Dec. 26 at the 
Los Angeles Theater, and the more striking parts 
of the play were warmly applauded. Miss Florence 
Roberts appeared in the leading part of Katlierine 
Van Riper and her interpretation of the role was 
most pleasing. In the part of Tom Jaffrey, the 
young Idaho mining engineer who, while lacking 
the crudity the New Yorker associates with most 
Westerners, is still a most ardent representative 
of Wstern ideals, Thurlow Bergen did intelligent 
work. J. Montague Buck, the Western boy "with 
the bark still on", was interpreted by Harry D. 
Gibbs, who rather overdid the part at times. Jere- 



miah Buck, the hearty, honest old mining man who 
had dug his millions out of the hills, was done by 
Louis Frohoff. 

Maud Buck, the miner's daughter, a small part, 
was accorded Susanne Siegel of this city. Such 
scant opportunities as the role afforded her she ful- 
filled satisfactorily. 

Two amusing characterizations were done by 
Kate Jepson and Georgie Woodthorpe as Mrs. 
Fordyce Brown and Mrs. Merington, aunts of Katli- 
erine Van Riper. These characters have been well 
developed by the playrights. 

The play is particularly interesting to Califor- 
nians in having been written by Geraldine Bonner 
and Elmer B. Harris, two writers who are well 
known to the Pacific Coast. Mr. Harris was called 
before the curtain at the conclusion of the second 
act the first night and expressed his regret that on 
account of illness which was keeping her in New 
York his coworker was not present to share with 
him the appreciation expressed by the audience. 

One may not hesitate :o say that the local audi- 
ences who saw the first productions of this well 
conceived play found much enjoyment in the ex- 
perience, and hope that it may have good luck- 
should it venture int the enemy's country, whereof 
the capital is New York. The theatrical climate of 
Gotham is an extreme one, however, and we fear 
that a frost will nip the Bonner-Harris bud. 



Occasionally something really funny comes out 
of London. One of these occasions brought forth 
"Charley's Aunt", and it- has been one of the joys 
of the English-speaking world ever since. 

The Belasco company has been doing pretty full 
justice to this rollicking farce during the week. 
While the demands it makes on the performers are 
not very heavy, still even a madcap farce can be 
spoiled more easily than the casual person believes 
by inexpert interpretation, and in "Charley's Aunt" 
the Belasco players are generally well cast. This 
applies to the male parts more particularly, for the 
female parts amount to next to nothing in the plan 
of the plav. They are written in merely as foils for 
"the boys", wdio raise Old Nick in sedate Oxford 
surroundings. The setting of the second act is very 
attractive. 

Richard Vivian as the amusing youth. Lord Fan- 
court Babberley, who is inveigled by his school 
chums, Jack Chesney and Charley Wykeham, into 
impersonating Charley's absent aunt, Donna Lucia 
D'Alvadorez, is responsible for the major portion of 
the fun. and he delivers the goods to the hearty 
satisfaction of the audience. Vivian certainly is a 
"corker" for looks in his make-up of the old aunt, 
and his facial expressions are enough to tickle the 
sourest critic. His roaring fun is all right of its 
kind, but the real touch of art, so far as a farce will 



28 



Pacific Outlook 



allow this touch to be felt, is given by Howard Scott 
in the character bit of Stephen Spettig-ue. 

The college youth, Charley, is well represented by 
Charley himself — Charley Ruggles, that is — and his 
chum. Jack, is undertaken by Harry Glazier. 

BrasSett, Jack Chesney's "man", is amusingly 
given by John Daly Murphy. 

We get nothing from Miss Emmet, the attractive 
new leading woman, in this production. She has 
a chance to look pretty, and that is about all. 

We are promised a play next week which is new 
to Los Angeles and that will afford an opportunity 
for Miss Emmet to prove herself before the local 
public. 



Many people have thought during the week that 
that walk of Joseph Kilgour's as he strutted- about 
the Auditorium stage in the dapper make-up of 
Gerald Riordan, M. P., of Ballynockslottery, Ire- 
land, was worth the price of admission. It is a 
catchy bit, without doubt, but really Dick Ferris in 
the Nat Goodwin role of Silas K. Woolcott "of 
Grass Valley, Cal.", in this production of "A Gold 
Mine", is so surprisingly good as to make the other 
roles of little moment. Ferris's impersonation of 
the rugged, humorous, shrewd, generous Western. 
American who becomes entangled among high- 
flyers of London society, with a member of which 
he is negotiating for the sale of his gold mine, is the 
truest, most life-like thing that Ferris has done so 
far in Los Angeles. 

As for the popular Miss Stone, her chief achieve- 
ment in the part of the Honorable Mrs. Meredith is 
that of looking extremely lovable from start to finr 
ish, despite the stiff English society ways and the 
tart anti-Americanism which she is supposed to 
represent, until the blunt"Californian, after long and 
goodnatured suffering under the lash of her preju- 
diced tongue, wins her at last by a self-impoverish- 
ing act of generosity to another which opens her 
eyes and her heart to the real worth of the funny 
little man from the transatlantic wilds. 

The play is a comedy in three acts by Brander 
Mathews and George H. Jessup, and while its 
movement is a little slow at times, still it is abund- 
antly supplied with clever lines, many of which 
make the heart of the average American audience 
glad, to judge from the enthusiastic applause 
aroused by the frequent and successful twists which 
the straightforward American hero gives the Brit-' 
ish Lion's tail and his many effective turns of con- 
versation wherein he downs the patronizing Brit- 
ishers "good and plenty". All this is pure joy to 
the galleries, and, it must be confessed, is not with- 
out its riotous effect upon the main floor. 

An effective characterization is done by Anna L. 
Bates in the part of Mrs. Vandervast, "The Only 
Juliet". The rest of the players have small scope. 
The stage is very handsomely set in this produc- 
tion. 



That fine old success, "Way Down East", so truly 
human, so thoroughly enjoyable, has been enter- 
taining the patrons of the Los Angeles Theater this 
week. This simple, strong story probably is the 
most familiar to American theater-goers of any that 
has ever been staged in the United States. Its long- 
career of unrivaled popularity shows that it is the 
straightforward human element that is the founda- 
tion of genuine success in a play. The current pro- 
duction is a good one. L. B. 



The AUDITORIUM SPAR ^^EK anag " 

"Theatre Beautiful" 

Week of January 5. Matinees Wednesday 
and Saturday 

First Production on Any Stage 

The FERRIS STOCK COMPANY 

and 
FLORENCE STONE 

In Gertrude Nelson Andrews' New Drama of Life as it is 



KATE SHANNON 



Prices: 10, 25, 35 and 50 cents. Matinees: 10 and 25 cenls 

Phones: F 2367, Main 5186 




•All the best- 



I IN ST RLMENTS 

For Band or Orchestra 

The only Collection of Fine Old Violins in the West 

Easy payments if desired 

dfit39eralb's 

113 South Spring Street 



Have Yo« 

Attended our Great Holiday Factory Sale or Pianos 

Free Music Scholarship 

Discounts from our Factory Prices 
Sale Closes December 14 

D. H. BALDWIN ®> CO. 



The Auditorium 



431 W. Fifth St,. 



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Imperfect Features Corrected 

We fill all cheek or eye hollows; thin necks, arms, hands, shoulders and 
busts by Ibe only flesh building, tissue strengthening substance ever discov- 
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not whether you are ill or well. This is the Marvelous Immedi- 
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S.iddle-back and deformed noses, scars, indents, receding chins, double 
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Europe and America. 

Instructions given to competent men and women for professional or their 
own use. 

New York Institute of Dermatology 

PROFESSOR AND MADAME STEELE 

829 South Hope Street Home Phone F 6 1 9 1 




Visitors are Cordially Invited 

AUDITORIUM 

5th and Olive Sts. 



PHOTOGRAPHER... 



Pacific Outlook 



29 



His First Appearance 
\\ .iris, the acti has made a 

"hit" in the big production of "Tom Jones" at the 
ew York, gives the following descri] 

Of hi- Mr-: 

My t"i r-t appearance i n any stage was on a Christ- 
mas night, therefore ii is the funniest Christm i- ex 
nee of m\ footlighi career. It was in London. 
I hail run away from home in San Francisco, deter- 
mined never to return, and equally resolved t>> be- 
an actor. 1 chose a music hall start. Whollv 



had obtained an introduction to him through a San 
Francisco friend. I'o the [ repti nted 

that I had had experience in America, and I was 
engaged to do m_\ - ng and dance, opening Christ- 
mas night. 

The music hall was patronized l>\ the laboring 
class d abi >ut se\ en thi iusand per- 

sons. I lie crowds began assembling about 5 o'clock 
in the afternoon to be sure of seat-, and, as this was 
ti i earl) for supper, there was an army of men 
with baskets of luncheon, which they peddled 




Mbs. Gertrude Nelson Andrews 

Of this city whose play "Kate Shannon" will be produced next week at the Auditorium 



without experience, I set out to learn dancing. 
took a few lessons in dancing and practiced night 
and day in my room. The racket of my unskilled 
feet over the heads of the other lodgers caused com- 
plaints which drove me to flight, one landlady after 
another ordering me out. Meantime Joseph Tabrar 
had written two songs for me. One was "I'm a 
Dude, Dandy Dude." the other "The Falsest Girl 
You Ever Came Anigh". Thus equipped, 1 faced 
the manager of Collin's Music Hall in Islington. I 



I among the waiting throngs. The favorite article of 
food provided by the venders was sheep's trotters, 
or feet. Of course, there were bones. 

My turn came and I began my act. I had got 
along to the first chorus of "I'm a Dude," when, 
chancing to glance at the side of the proscenium 
arch. I beheld a glaring sign, which read: 

"Gentlemen Will Please Not Throw Trotter 
I'm nics at the Actors on the Stage." 

The significance of this request hit me instantly. 



30 



Pacific Outlook 



Visions of sheep's feet filling the air and headed my 
way petrified me with apprehension. My tongue 
stuck, my feet grew numb, my whole being was 
paralyzed. To this day I do not remember getting 
off the stage, though I have been told the stage 
manager dragged me off. I remember hearing him 
say "You had better get out of this as soon as you 
can," and my next clear recollection is being in the 
cab on the way back to my room. I removed my 
make-up as best I could with my handkerchief, and 
ventured no further appearance as a song and dance 
artist. Next season I came back to America and 
went on the stage in a legitimate company, though 
I confess I told the manager I had had experience 
in London as a music hall performer. 



"American Cousin" Again 

Those of the older generation of Washington resi- 
dents have had the old days brought back with 
striking effect by the revival of "Our American 
Cousin," the play which was running at the old 
Ford theater when President Lincoln was shot. Un" 
til this revival it had not been reproduced since the 
night of the assassination. 

Singularly enough, it was revived on the spot 
where a similar attempt was made on the life of 
Secretary Seward. The Belasco theater, in which 
the play is staged, is built on the side of the old 
Seward mansion, facing Lafayette square. 

The character" of Lord Dundreary, the humorous 
lord, made the elder Sothern famous, and the son 
is scoring a complete success in. the role, although 
the graybeards tell their children they "ought to 
have seen the elder Sothern in Lord Dundreary." 

President Roosevelt was a notable figure in an 
exceptionally brilliant audience the opening night. 
It was peculiarly an occasion for an outpouring of 
official Washington. 



Theater Notes 

A play by Mrs. Gertrude Nelson Andrews of 
this city, entitled "Kate Shannon", will be produced 
next week at. the Auditorium by the Ferris com- 
pany, with Miss Florence Stone in the title role. 
Monday night will see this play presented for the 
first time on any stage, and it is said to represent a 
strong story of real life with characters the proper 
interpretation of which will call for the best that 
there is in the Ferris players. The. scene is laid in 
New York. Beside Miss Stone's role, parts that 
will be prominent will be those interpreted by Kil- 
gour, Eleanor Montell and Carrie Clarke Ward, the 
latter being cast in a humorous characterization. 
Harry Cashman, who played with this organization 
last year, will make his reappearance in this pro- 
duction. 

"The Three of Us", being the "story of a gold 
mine", will occupy the Belasco stage for the com- 
ing week. Manager Blackwood promises that this 
will be one of the striking features of the local thea- 
trical season. The play had a run of eight months 
at the Madison Square Theater, New York, and 
never has been seen here. Miss Emmet will inter- 
pret the role played in New York by Miss Carlota 
Neilsen. 

The San Francisco Opera Company will begin 
an engagement at the Los Angeles Theater next 
week in "The Toy Maker." 

Prior to Miss Susanne Siegel's departure with 



the Florence Roberts Company she announced her 
engagement to Ernest Glendenning, formerly of the 
Belasco and now of the Alcazar Theater, San Fran- 
cisco. Miss Siegel is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
H. Siegel of this city. 

The Fellowship dramatic class, which has been 
under the direction of George A. Dobinson for some 
time, gave an elaborate New Year's eve entertain- 
ment at Gamut Auditorium Wednesday. 

Of the thirty-six young women in the chorus of 
"Tom Jones" not one is a foreigner, an unusual con- 
dition among so many singers. All are Americans 
and they represent nearly every big city in the 
United States. Two hail from Los Angeles, one 
from San Francisco and one from Seattle. 

Theatergoers who remember the "Robin Hood" 
of the Bostonians of long ago, this week welcomed 
Eugene Cowles the basso with the "Marrying 
Mary" companjr. Mr. Cowles has enjoyed popu- 
larity on the light opera stage for many years. He 
was one of the younger members of the Bostonians 
but he won a success that caused the critics to la- 
ment his failure to appear in the grand opera for 
which his voice once gave promise of making a 
place for him. 



Symphony Soloist 

Undoubtedly the fact that Herbert Witherspoon, 
the famous basso, is to be the soloist of the next 
concert of the Los Angeels Symphony Orchestra, 
January 14, will prove a great drawing card. 

There are various reasons for Witherspoon's ver- 
satility in programmes, not the least of which is the 
splendid knowledge he possesses of modern as well 
as classical composers' works, added to which he 
is the possessor of a tremendous repertoire and is a 
linguist of no mean skill. 

One finds few singers of the present day includ- 
ing in an evening's programme as he does twenty- 
six to twenty-eight songs, one or two oratorio num- 
bers and two or three operatic arias. 

Italy has held that of all the male voices, the cen- 
tral r singing basso is the ^most desirable (and 
enviable. Less bulky and ponderous than the basso 
profundo, it lias equal dignity, imprefesiveness and 
potentiality, with sombreness and rnelancholy if 
needed. Such a voice is Witherspoon's. 



Music Notes 

Jan Kubelik.the violin prodigy of ten years ago, 
now a man of twenty-seven, seems to have upset 
the tradition that prodigies never fulfill the promise 
of their childhood. He will be heard in this city 
for two concerts during the current month. Since 
his recent engagement at the Hippodrome, New 
York, he has been traveling toward the Pacific 
Coast, receiving everywhere the ovation that comes 
only to those who earn the popular favor of the 
music loving people of this country. It is safe to 
say that when he appears here it will be to crowded 
houses. 

A great deal of interest has been aroused by the 
announcement that the University Glee Club, the 
De Koven Club and the Berkeley Elk's Quartette 
are to appear jointly in a concert of classical, popu- 
lar and college songs Tuesday evening at Simpson's 
Auditorium. The Berkeley Elks' Quartette is com- 
posed of Clinton R. Morse, Charles Mills, Joseph 
Mills and Frank S. Argall. 



Pacific Outlook 



;5i 




Pictorial Sketch of Rosenkranz, No. 6. 




Today we show the living room of the residence we have been picturing in former issues. 

The luxurious comfort of this room is reflected in every room of the house. There are oak and maple 
floors throughout, artistic electric fixtures, beamed ceiling in the dining room, and oil paintings hand painted 
on the walls, a cozy den, large and well-placed porches, two bath rooms with showers, and, for those who 
love outdoor life, a largo sleeping porch. The whole house is heated' by furnace, but open grates add to the 
beauty and comfort of the rooms. 

The price is $30,000 and it is cheap. Any good bonds, stocks or property will be accepted for part 
payment. Balance on mortgage. 




For particulars see 



R. D. LIST, 400 I. W. Hellman Bldg., 4th and Main 



HOME PHONE 
A 7663 



Other views will he shown in succeeding issues. 





, A A_ ^ ,J 


X»t J8* i* di 


2J:fl M : ?^- jRB 




7 1 


tT- - , * 4i ^*ii^«_^»*^««~^^__^P-::^*.~-»-^ 


- ■ •—-■"; . . 



Packed in Belgium Ready for Shipment to America 



BAY TREES 



BAY TREES 



Three hundred Bay trees in different sizes and shapes from $5 to $400 a pair. Two hundred Boxwood in 
standard and pyramids, all sizes. Two hundred English Holly with bright red berries. English Laurel, 
Rhododendrons, well set with buds. Azalias, for forcing and bedding. Araucarias, Aspidistris, Evonymus 
aurea, Acubia japonica. (One variety with berries.) Come in and see the largest assortment of foreign 
plants ever shipped to the Pacific Coast. Messrs. Beery and Nbrris have just returned from Europe, where 
they have made a personal selection of their entire stock. To reach the nursery, take a Washington street 
or University car. Home phone B 1014. 

BEERY & INORRIS, Corner Washington and Fi^ueroa Sts. 



TLhc Boaro of directors of tbe 

(Berman^Hmerican Savings Bank 

aLos Hngeles, California 

takes pleasure in calling the attention of the public to the following strong and conservative statement of one 
of the oldest and largest Savings Banks in the Southwest: 



January 1, 1908 



RESOURCES 

Cash $1,600,856.81 

United States and Other Bonds 1,324,134.60 

Loans 6,776,189.11 

Safe Deposit Vaults, Furniture and Fix- 
tures 65,376.27 

Real Estate 17,807.39 

Other Assets 1,526:69 



$9,785,890.87 



LIABILITIES 

Deposits 

Capital Stock Paid In 

Surplus and Undivided Profits . . 



.$8,869,672.92 
600,000.00 
316,217.95 



$9,785,890.87 



Safety, rather than income, is the important factor with this bank. 
It is the logical depository for those appreciating efficient management and courteous treatment. 

Officers 

W. S. BARTLETT, President. JOS. ID. RADFORD, Vice-President. E. D. ELLIOTT, Assistant '.Cashier. 
M. N. AVEIRY, Vice-President. W. F. CALLANDER, Cashier. R P. HILLMAN, Assistant Cashier. 

W. E. McVAY, Vice-President, J. F. ANDREWS, Assistant Cashier. 

Directors 

J. M. Elliott, President First National Bank; O. T. Johnson, 'Capitalist: I. N. Van Nuys, Capitalist; E. T. 
Earl, (Capitalist; J. C. Drake, President Los Angeles Trust Co.; Gail B. Johnson, Vice-President Pacific Mu- 
tual Life Ins. Co.; Victor Ponet, Capitalist; C. N. Flint, Cashier Commercial National Bank; J. M. Schnei- 
der, Manager Boston Dry Goods Store; P. F. Schumacher, 'Capitalist; Walter F. Haas, Attto'rney-at-Law; 
M. N. Avery, Vice-President; W. E. McVay, Vice-President, Jos. D. Radford, Vice-President; W. S. Bart- 
lett, President. 



PRESENT LOCATION 
223 SOUTH SPRING STREET 

Branch- 



— New Location After February 1st — 
S. E. CORNER SPRING AND FOURTH STS. 
•Main and First Streets 



..A^..,c.Hf.,„, ALONG THE BARBARY COAST 



Al^O/^ 






January 11, 1908 



k'\ 



fe 



3 — ! 



' 



AS 



Weekly 






I ' 



SINGLE COPY 10 CENTS 



BY THE YEAR * 2°° 




Old Record Left Far Behind 



Record Smashing Sale breads all 'Previous Records 

We have been smashing records every day since this sale began and have 
given publicity to some of the greatest merchandise values ever offered the Los 
Angeles public. 

The supply is by no means exhausted, reserve stocks have been drawn 
on, new lots have come in, and the second week of this sale promises even 
more sensational values than the first. Watch ihe Pap rs. 

Remarkable Coat Values 

Eveiy woman who wishes to save should secure a coat in this sale. Pronoun- 
ced Savings on the season's most popular styles in materials of unquestionable 
quality. 



"SOA\tT/ 



OINC" 




BROADWAY 



COR Finn ST. 




The "USE IT brand of soaps, polishes and powders is now being 
introduced to the consuming public. The AMERICAN NAPH- 
THA WASHING POWDER is unexcelled for use in the house- 
hold and combined with the "USE IT" SCOURING SOAP 
PO \VDER make the most formidable array of cleansers, sold under 
the name of the AMERICAN CLEANSERS, offered on the mar- 
ket today. Ask your grocer for the best and insist on getting the "USE 
1 1 Brand. ^Manufactured by The American Commercial Co., Ltd., 
Los Angeles. 




George Baker Jtnderton 
EDITOR 



Jh Southwestern. Weekly 

Lanier Bartle*t 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR 



Howard Clark Galtoupe 

ADVERTISING MANAGER 






Published every Saturday at 3tS»3l9*S20 Lissner Build'.ng, 
Lot Angeles, California, by the 

Pacific Outlook Company. 

Subscription price S3.no a year in advance. Single copy to 
cents on alt news stands. 

Entered ai second-class matter April 5, 1907, at the poslorlice at Los Angeles, 
California, under the act of Congress of March J, 1879. 

The Editor of the Pacific Outlook cannot guarantee to return manuscripts, 
though he will endeavor to do so if stamps for that purpose are inclosed with them 
If your manuscript is valuable, keep a copy of it. 

Vol. 4. Los Jtngeles. Cat., January II, I90S Mo. 2 

NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS 

The Pacific Outlook is mailed to subscribers through 
the Los Angeles Post Office every Friday, and should be 
delivered in every part of the city by Saturday's post. If 
for any reason it should be delayed, or be delivered in 
poor condition, subscribers will confer a favor upon the 
publishers by giving them immediate notice. The date on 
the wrapper shows the time to which your subscription is 
paid as shown by our ledgers. No receipts will be mailed 
unless specially requested. Telephone Home F 7966. 



COMMENT 

THE POLITICAL FIGHT over the Mare Island 
navy yard is rapidly assuming an interesting phase. 
Earl}- in the present session of congress Represent- 
ative E. A. Hayes framed a bill providing for the 
transfer of the naval base from Mare Island to some 
deep water position on San Francisco bay. The 
low water at the station opposite Vallejo has been 
the subject of serious consideration on the part of 
the naval authorities for some time, and when not 
long since it was found necessary to send a ship 
no larger than the California from San 
Mare Island Francisco to Bremerton for trifling 

Politics repairs, simply because she could not 
be handled in the shallow waters at 
Mare Island, the naval critics at once pointed out 
the necessity of changing the naval base. In view 
of the fact that some of the large fighting ships of 
the navy may soon be stationed on the Pacific coast 
the grounds for the contention of the critics are in- 
stantly apparent. If Mare Island is unsuited to the 
handling of ships of heavy draft, the suggestion of 
Representative Hayes certainly deserves careful con- 
sideration. But whether it does or not may remain 
with the senators from California. 

* * * 

SENATOR PERKINS takes the political view, 
as might have been expected, that inasmuch as the 
base already has been established, it must remain 
where it is, even if the channel has to be deepened, 
entailing annual work at great expense, although 



naval engineers unite in declaring that the channel 
cannot be permanently deepened. The policj of 
Senator Perkins is explained, possibly, by two facts: 
First, the Mare Island navy yard has been his hobby, 
and he docs not want to be placed in a position 

where he will be compelled to admit his 

Hayes vs. error in advocating that site" for the chief 

Ferkins naval base of the Pacific coast; second, 

he has come to regard Solano county 
and the other territory contiguous thereto as a con- 
quered province, whose voters can be depended up- 
on, under ordinary circumstances, to support those 
candidates for the state legislature who are willing 
to pledge themselves to vote for him for United 
States senator. This is the political side of the story, 
in epitome. So it is evident that Representative 
Hayes will have his hands full if he undertakes to 
press his demand that the California naval base shall 
be upon deep water. 

* * * 

INTEREST in the fight over the San Francisco 
postmastership is intensified by the outcome of the 
Berkeley contest, in which President Wheeler of the 
University of California and other forces for good 
government won a signal victory over the Southern 
Pacific machine and the organization members of 
the delegation in congress. The outcome of the 
Berkeley fight was a direct slap in the face of the 
organization and a rebuke to Senator Perkins and 
Representative Knowland. It now develops that an- 
other Southern Pacific politician is to be denied re- 
appointment — Arthur J. Fisk, candidate to succeed 
himself in the San Francisco postoffice. Fisk, form- 
erly speaker of the house of representatives of the 
state legislature, is known as a time-server for Boss 

Herrin, whose intimate association 

Faithful with him in political operations in the 

Schoolmates state is notorious. Fisk was also a 

schoolmate of Senatot Flint and of 
First Assistant Postmaster General Hitchcock, 
which possibly will be accepted in partial explana- 
tion, at least, of their attitude in the matter of his 
candidacy. Both Senator Flint and Mr. Hitchcock 
are standing at the back of Senator Perkins. Op- 
posed to them, alone, is Representative Hayes, who 
insists that the postmaster of San Francisco shall be 
a man whose chief qualification is almost anything 
except that he has been a faithful servant of some 
corporate interest in California. Fisk is a good poli- 
tician, as politicians in California go, but under his 
administration the postal service in San Francisco 



Pacific Outlook 



has been notoriously bad. The people of California 
may confidently look to a victory for Representative 
Hayes and decency in this matter. 



* * * 

SOME TIME SINCE Chief of Police Kern called 
attention to the need of a new city jail. In his an- 
nual message Mayor Harper insists that the jail 
must be forthcoming. There is no doubt that the 
city stands in need of this institution, but how in 
the world we are going to get one, with no money 
to pay for it, is one of the problems that even the 
mayor does not appear to be able to solve. Condi- 
tions at the jail are bad enough — as bad as they 
well could be — as all who are familiar 
The Jail with the circumstances will have to ad- 
Puzzle mit; but there looms no solution of the 
important problem of funds. This is a 
matter which invites the earnest consideration of 
the council. Common humanity dictates that the 
new jail should be forthcoming at the earliest pos- 
sible date. Of that there is no doubt. The mayor 
takes the correct view of the matter. But it is to 
be deplored that some practical suggestion as to 
how this highly desirable institution is to be built 
and paid for has not been forthcoming from some 
source. 

* * * 

ANOTHER POINT in the mayor's message 
should engage the immediate attention of the whole 
city. It is a vital matter. The mayor advises that 
when the new charter is framed provision should 
be made for an annual school building fund. We 
have been hampered in this matter of school facili- 
ties for a long time. That so much has been accom- 
plished as we may now behold is surprising, under 
all the circumstances. A new high 
Which is More school building is badly needed, 

Important? and many of the graded school 
buildings are inadequate. If mon- 
ey is to be forthcoming for but one of either of 
these improvements to which we have referred, 
would it not be the part of wisdom to make pro- 
vision first for the upbuilding of our school system, 
letting the jail problem come up for consideration 
later? In an emergency the city authorities can 
dispatch the bums and loafers to some point beyond 
the city, but we can hardly get rid of our school 
children. 

* * * 

THE MAYOR has a good word to say for the 
manner in which the whiskey men of the city have 
conducted their business during the first year of his 
administration. "There never was a time in the 
history of Los Angeles," he declares, "when the liq- 
uor business was conducted in a better manner than 
it is today. It has been the policy of the police 



commission to keep a watchful eye on all places 
where liquor is sold, and to see that 
Saloons and all laws are complied with." While 
the Law this may have been the policy of the 
police commission and while the may- 
or may believe that the policy of the commission 
has led to such work on the part of the police de- 
partment as to result in the closing of the saloons 
on Sunday, as the law provides, the fact is, neverthe- 
less, that all saloons are not actually closed to busi- 
ness Sundays. If the police commissioners believe 
that the laws on the subject of liquor selling are 
actually being strictly enforced it is mistaken. They 
are not. 

* * * 

TEN DAYS have elapsed since the first day of 
January, the date on which the term of office of 
James A. Anderson as member of the Board of 
Public Works expired, and Mayor Harper has not 
yet seen fit to reappoint Mr. Anderson. Several 
days before the end of the year the mayor said that 
he would reappoint this valued citizen to the office 
he has filled with signal success. His delay in keep- 
ing his word has raised the suspicion in the mind of 
more than one man that what the Pacific Outlook 
said on this subject last week was based on a well- 
grounded fear. "The policy of temporizing in this 
matter," said this paper, "causes a suspicion that 
the mayor is determined, after all that has been 

said and done, to avoid reappoint- 

Bitter Pill ing Mr. Anderson if possible." If 

for the Mayor Mayor Harper entertains the hope 

that, by dilatory tactics, he will 
succeed in rendering the official position of Mr. An- 
derson so embarrassing that the latter will be in- 
duced to resign, thereby giving the mayor a free 
hand and enabling him to name some Democratic 
politician to the post, the administration is doomed 
to chagrin. Mr. Anderson will not resign, and the 
council will not confirm any other man to the posi- 
tion. There will be no politics in the work of the 
Board of Public Works. And meantime every 
day's delay on Mayor Harper's part in sending Mr. 
Anderson's name to the. council brings with it con- 
viction, that the mayor regards this concession to 
public opinion as a very bitter pill, the swallowing 
of which he wants to put ofE as long as possible. 

* * * 

THERE IS no doubt that the advisability of 
abandoning the opposition to Mr. Anderson's re- 
appointment is a crushing blow to the administra- 
tion programmers. H at 'this time the mayor had 
succeeded in dislodging one member of the board 
as at present constituted and naming in his place a 
trusted Democratic politician, it would be much 
easier to turn a trick of the same kind upon the 
expiration of the term of either Mr. Edwards or 



Pacific Outlook 



Mr. Hubbard, thus giving the politicians two out of 
three members. What this might mean to Los An- 
geles is best left to the imagination. To dwell upon 

the possibilities is far from pleasant. 
Victims But whether an entirely new board 
of Habit should be made to consist of men in 
whom the people had unlimited con- 
fidence does not enter into the question. The fact 
is that the citizens of Los Angeles are eminently 
satisfied with the work of the present board and the 
character of the men of which it is composed and 
are not disposed to take any unnecessary chances 
in the appointment of any other men so long- as 
these three men will consent to serve. The politi- 
cians identified with the present administration 
ought to be convinced of this fact after the demon- 
strations of the past two or three weeks. They 
probably are — but the Parker habit is hard to 
shake off. 

* * * 

PERHiAPS the greatest argument that can be 
made in behalf of the proposition to leave the fen- 
der ordinance as it is lies in the fact that several 
months ago the council threshed the question out 
and decided that the desire of the Pacific Electric 
that its interurban cars be exempted from the pro- 
visions of the ordinance should not be granted. If 
no good reason for such exemption could be found 
then and conditions are the same, why should the 
council change its determination in the matter? It 
has been shown conclusively that the fenders de- 
manded by the ordinance can be at- 
Paramount tached and removed from the cars 
Consideration in a very brief space of time and 
that, their operation would not be 
materially interfered with if the fenders were thus 
attached. The merits of the case, from all view- 
points, have been freely discussed. Considerations 
of humanity demand that every electric railway 
company using the public streets, with the consent 
of the people, shall make every possible provision 
for the security of human life. This is the par- 
amount consideration, though the soul of the Pa- 
cific Electric company does not conceive it to be so. 
If some one near and dear to each member of the 
council should be killed by a fenderless car of this 
company no further debate on the question would 
be needed. 

* * * 

. THE EPITHETS and adjectives in the superla- 
tive degree which the Times almost daily applies 
to those high-minded men who are so fortunate as 
to be able to bring themselves to disagree with 
that organ of the Harriman-Herrin-Times-Fake 
Taft Club machine in discussing those govern- 
mental principles known as the direct primary, the 
initiative, the referendum and the recall are becom- 
ing excruciating. It is too bad that the English 



abular) does tiol furnish a few mure striking 

"Anarchists", "demagogues"', "renegades", 

"shams" and names like these arc becoming pain- 
fully wearisome. As the contest between the ad- 
vocates of genuine popular government and the 
organ of the Fake Taft clubs of the 
Reca'l Here Southern Pacific machine waxes 
to Stay hotter, we may anticipate the em- 
ployment of some such names as 
"beasts", "skunks", "savages", "vermin", even 
"assassins". But inasmuch as the influence of the 
Times wanes in proportion to the development of 
the spirit of political liberty fostered by the Lin- 
coln-Roosevelt Republican League, the despicable 
tactics of the Times — the only one in its class in 
this respect in California — prove of less and less 
avail. The initiative, the referendum and the recall 
are permanent institutions in the Los Angeles char- 
ter, and now that the motives of their chief enemy 
are so well understood all danger of their elimina- 
tion from that document has passed. If the Times 
really wants to injure the cause of popular govern- 
ment it ought to turn its coat (an easy task, as his- 
tory proves) and befriend them. 

* * * 

THE TAFT CLUBS, organized under that name, 
have been aptly characterized by the Express as 
"fakes". It is notorious that their organization was 
begun in the hope of drawing the ammunition of 
the Lincoln-Roosevelt Republican clubs. Every 
so-called Taft club is manned by men picked by 
Boss Parker and his lieutenants. The sole aim 
of the promoters of these fraud clubs is to draw as 
heavily as possible from the genuine 
People Not Republican clubs. The Taft clubs 
All Fools are not Republican clubs. They are 
Southern Pacific machine clubs, noth- 
ing else. The names of the men responsible for 
them and officering t-hem guarantee this. They are 
something else: They are an echo of the last de- 
spairing shriek of an abomination in the eyes of the 
decent people of California, whether Republicans or 
Democrats. They are partners of the cowardly 
commercial organizations of San Francisco which 
are endeavoring to make the work of Isidor Jacobs 
and the shippers' organization he represents futile. 
But they will fail in their mission. The people are 
not all fools. 

* * * 

JUST NOW, when the critic of the American 
navy, whoever this fellow who started the calamity- 
howl may be. seems to have the floor and be hold- 
ing it by virtue of the loudness of his voice and the 
startling' suddenness with which he loosed it. it is 
at least only fair to stop and listen long enough to 
hear what the voices for the defense have to say ; 
voices which, on account of their quieter, saner tone 
— a qualitv resulting from confidence that their 
message will prevail in the end — hardly are audible 



6 



Pacific Outlook 



yet above the din of the sensationalists. Rear Ad- 
miral William T. Burwell, commandant of the 
Puget Sound navy yard, makes this rational sum- 
ming-up of the manner in which the construction 
•plans of our warships are wrought out from the 
divergent ideas of the different experts : "Here is 
the matter in a nutshell: A ship can carry just so 
much load, say 15,000 tons. This includes, of 
course, its own weight.- Now, the gun man wants 
15,000 tons of guns on board, the engineer wants 
15,000 tons of engines and coal, and the armor man 
wants 15,000 tons of armor. Clearly, then, a battle- 
ship is a compromise between all 
Listen to the these requirements. If you raise 
Saner Voices the sides such as those of the ' 

Dakota class you will, of course, 
have splendid sea-going qualities and high speed, 
but look at the target you offer the other fellow's 
guns. Of course, these high sides can not be of as 
heavy armor as the low sides. As for what he says 
about the sides of our ships being too low, I will 
say that for two years I commanded the Oregon, 
the lowest vessel of her class in the world, and in 
all that time, except once, I could have fired every 
gun on board in all kinds of weather." Ever since 
we began to build modern ships, the American type 
has differed from the European. For us to be dif- 
ferent from others is not necessarily proof of our 
stupidity. The low freeboard always has been an 
American peculiarity of construction, and our ex- 
perts have had their reasons for continuing it. 
Reasonable, constructive criticism is proper and 
necessary, but sensationalism is destructive ; and 
there seems to be a decided coloring of the latter 
in this hubbub over our naval "defects'' which, in 
the main, seem to consist in differences of opinion 
between American and foreign constructors. 
* * * 
WHATEVER MAY BE the technical merits of 
the case over which the President and Admiral 
Brownson cannot agree, there is one thing plain to 
the lay mind and mortifying to the patriotic citizen, 
which is, that the dignity of the nation and the 
efficiency of our navy soon will be ruined if fac- 
tional feeling in the naval departments continues 
to overrule the sense of patriotic duty; and if such 
a discipline-shattering plan is adhered to as that 
just followed by Admiral Brownson who deserted 
an important post because he could not "have his 
way", ours will become the sport of other navies. 
Granting that he may be in the right and that the 
President may have been a little overbearing, still, 
if it becomes the habit of American officers to "get 
their backs up" and resign whenever they receive 
orders of which they disapprove from a superior, 
then our military organizations will be worth no 
more professionally than a rabble, which already is 
the opinion many foreigners hold of them. We 
think this fact is made most obvious in the follow- 



ing paragraph from the letter addressed by the 
President to the Secretary of the Navy concerning 
the Brownson resignation : "The officers of the navy 

must remember that it is not merely 
Dangerous childish, but in the highest degree 
Selfishness reprehensible, to permit personal 

pique, wounded vanity or factional 
feeling on behalf of some particular bureau to ren- 
der them disloyal to the interests of the navy, and 
therefore of the country as a whole. The question 
whether one officer or another should command a 
ship is of little consequence compared with the 
weakening of all command and discipline which 
would result if officers were to refuse to serve when 
their tempers are ruffled by adverse decisions on the 
part of their superiors. Their sole concern should 
be the good of the service, and save only the lack 
of courage in actual warfare, obedience and loyalty 
are the most essential quality in keeping the ser- 
vice up to the highest standard." 

* * * 

WHAT IS patriotism? Possibly one might bet- 
ter ask "What illustrates lack of patriotism?" The 
question is suggested by an incident, which hap- 
pened in Pasadena during the floral parade on New 
Year's day. Near Hotel Maryland' thousands had 
gathered to witness the parade. Noisy demonstra- 
tions were made by the crowd as the various floats 
passed by. Soon a small contingent of the "boys in 
blue", veterans of the Civil War, stumbled by. Less 
inspiring a sight than the flowers, not a word or a 

sign of welcome or applause greeted 
What One them. Pretty soon their places in 
Man Did. front of the assemblage were taken 

by a few sailors representing the 
United States ship Bennington. At their head 
marched a man carrying a banner bearing the in- 
telligence that the flag following, carried by four 
of the sailors, was the flag which went down with 
the ill-fated man-of-war. In all that crowd just 
one man doffed his hat out of respect to the mem- 
ory of the many young lives snuffed out when the 
explosion on the Bennington occurred — and that 
was all ! One man out of that crowd of thousands ! 
One man ! How soon we forget ! 

* * * 

PASSION IS all right in poetry but when it is 
held up before the public and analyzed in sloppy 
newspaper gush by the columnfull it is made dis- 
gusting and the reading public is made a fool of. 
We wonder if 'the public has had enough of the 
Ella Wheeler Wilcox brand of emotional tommy- 
rot. If not, it must be considered a vapid pub- 
lic. The analysis of human passions, good and bad, 
when masterfully or poetically presented, is univer- 
sally recognized as being of the intensest interest 
to civilized mankind, and intellectually beneficial. 
It always has been the heart of all literatures. But 



Pacific Outlook 



•ur forth newspaper "interviews" on the mo- 
tives which may have prompted such-an-such a 
clergyman to desert his legal wife and elope with 

a pupil of hi* Sunday-school, why lie 
"Passional" finds greater happiness, or unhappi- 
Tommyrot m-ss. or whatever the resultant emo- 
tions may In- which his symptoms' 
indicate, and what steps it is probable, after an 
analysis of her provocate ns in conjunction with the 
vagaries of feminine nature ami the Pleiades, or 
other astral highsign, the legitimate wife will 
take against the "emotionally overcome" clergyman 
who has settled and started a new family in this 
our "passional zone" without legal or wifely per- 
mission — this is slobbery nonsense. Also, the 
Poetess of Passion has given forth an analytical 
"interview" on the character of the girl forger, 
Ruby Casselman. with, of course, suggestions of the 
highly emotional possibility of "a man in the case", 
Such stuff as this has neither scientific nor literary 
value to excuse it. 

* * * 

THE REV. WALTER E. TANNER of Melrose, 
near Oakland, must be a very bold chap indeed, 
or else he must have been out seeing things at night 
shortly before he made (if correctly quoted in an 
Oakland newspaper) these lurid declarations from 
his pulpit : "Cigarette smoking and wine drinking 
are habitual in women's clubs. * * * In half 
the women's clubs in San Francisco cigarette smok- 
ing and wine drinking are habitually indulged in, 
and drunken women are, to my knowledge, fre- 
quently taken home at three or four o'clock in the 
morning." Whew! but that's putting it pretty 
strong. A person's inclination on first reading such 

lurid talk as this naturally is to 
A Shot at conjecture that the Rev. Mr. Tan- 

Women's Clubs tier had gotten his localities 

mixed during some three or four 
a. m., perregrinations of his own in San Francisco 
and that he had become confused in his definition 
of what a woman's club, in the proper application 
of the term, really is. But the Ebell of Oakland and 
other prominent clubs of the North are reported 
to have taken this bold minister's accusations seri- 
ously and to have heaped him up to his ears in 
indignant rebuttals. Personally, we may safely say 
that we never have seen anything in feminine club 
life in these parts quite so bad as the Melrose re- 
former pictures in San Francisco ! 

* * * 

They Love Us Still 

And now comes the London Daily News with . 
this characteristic jeer: "The American fleet would 
crumple up and disappear before its Japanese an- 
tagnists if ever the two nations came to blows." 
Goodness gracious, how the generous, forgiving 
British do love us still, after all these years of un- 
willing separation! 



WHAT NOTED PEOPLE SAY 



Concerning the Cruise 
Cu'tun Mahan, Naval Expert 
The experiment— for such it is until it has be- 
come experience — should have been made sooner 
rather than be now postooned. That it was not 

sooner attempted ha* been, probably, because the 
growth 'if the Navy has only now reached the num- 
bers, sufficiently homogeneous, to make the move- 
ment exhaustively instructive. 

The movement of the United States battle fleet 
from the Atlantic to the Pacific coast is in the high- 
est sense practical, because it is precisely the kind 
of movement which the fleet of any nation may, and 
usually will, be required to make in war. It is fur- 
ther practical, because the United States has a Pa- 
cific as well as an Atlantic coast, and has not a navy 
large enough to be divided safely between them. 
The question is at least debatable, whether for the 
near future the Pacific is not the greater center of 
world interest; as it certainly is, with regard to our 
own military necessities, one of greater exposure 
than the Atlantic. 

No amount of careful prearrangement in an office 
takes the place of doing the thing itself. It is sure- 
ly a safe generalization, that no complicated scheme 
of action, no invention, was ever yet started without 
giving rise to difficulties which anxious care had 
failed to foresee. If challenged to point out the 
most useful lesson the fleet may gain, it may be not 
unsafe to say : its surprises, the unexpected. If we 
can trust press reports, surprise has already begun 
in the home ports. The fleet apparently has not 
been able to get ready as soon as contemplated. If 
so, it will be no small gain to the Government to 
know the several hitches; each small but cumula- 
tive. 



The Canal and the Navy 

Secretary Taft 

I venture to say that we shall be disappointed at 
first in the amount of business done in the canal. 
It doubles the efficiency of our navy, but in the 
matter of trade you cannot turn it all at once, and 
I will say that it will take ten years to adjust the 
world to the new method of getting around it. I do 
not believe we will get our money out of the canal 
in a great many years in the form of tolls, but it is 
not necessary that we should. It is a great work for 
mankind that we are doinp-. and we can well afford 
to wait for any orofit. 

And now about the navy. I am the secretary of 
war, and that has a very formidable and pugnacious 
sound. As a matter of fact, if we had a war I 
should feel like resigning. I do believe from the 
soles of my feet to the top of my thin hair that a 
navy maintained as it ought to be, because we have 
the money to maintain it. is an insurance against 



Pacific Outlook 



unnecessary war. Not that we should boast, but 
a nation of 80,000,000 people who believe them- 
selves as far advanced in civilization as any nation, 
should be in a condition where, when it is necessary 
to assert themselves, they may do so not only with 
dignity but with something- behind that dignity to 
enforce their judgment. 



English Banker's Views 

Sir Fbux Schuster 

Our friends on the other side of the Atlantic have 
an unbounded belief in the future of their country, 
a belief which its natural resources fully justifies. 
They have also a way of discounting the future 
somewhat too rapidly. Legitimate enterprise is fol- 
lowed by speculation, and speculation based on 
credit. Vast undertakings are embarked upon the 
expectation that cash in any quantity is always at 
hand, and then suddenly it is discovered that the 
strain has become too great. 

It is inevitable that monetary stringency, such as 
has been witnessed in the United States, results in 
the crippling of industries, the restriction of trade, 
and the lowering of prices of commodities. This 
has taken place at a large extent already, and must 
affect trade throughout the world. In the mean- 
time the strain upon European gold reserves has 
been so great as to interfere seriously with the nor- 
mal course of business, and each nation has, as it 
were, been thrown on its own resources. 

That the United States will ultimately out of its 
own resources overcome their present troubles does 
not, to my mind, admit of any doubt. 
* * * 

Success of a Writer 

It is always pleasant to record "success" after the 
name of any dweller in Southern California and 
surely the new year gives much promise for the 
writers, musicians and artists of Los Angeles. This 
thought is suggested by the growing recognition 
of the work of Grace Adele Pierce, who came to the 
coast several years ago in search of health. In her 
native state, New York, Miss Pierce had held a high 
position as author and editor. She had won inter- 
national fame by her poems and stories. Too close 
application to the various lines of work which en- 
gaged her attention made it necessary for her to 
seek a milder climate and a more restful environ- 
ment. That is why Santa Monica had the oppor- 
tunity to welcome her as a resident. 

Since she came to the coast Miss Pierce had 
steadilv gained in health. At first, when she was 
not yet able to continue her contributions to the 
leading magazines, she turned to a new field — news- 
paper work. Her friends laughed at the idea of 
the poet as a reporter, but it was soon proved that 
the insight, the sympathy and the dramatic power 
which made the poems worth while were qualities 



which could be employed in writing human interest 
stories. Moreover, the alertness of mind invalu- 
able in literary endeavor proved a rare aid in the 
gathering of news. Miss Pierce chronicled con- 
temporary history in English so pure and smooth 
and in a style so vivid and so effective that what- 
ever she wrote had a compelling force. For a time 
. it seemed that the woman who had sung songs of 
surpassing beauty had forsaken the world of dreams 
for the domain of the stern realities of life. Within 
the last year, however, Miss Pierce has been able 
to go back to purely literary effort and she has pro- 
duced lyrics and sonnets of lasting worth. Her 
success has been so decided that she is planning to 
return to New York in the spring. 

Miss Pierce is the author of a volume of prose 
and verse published just before she came West. 
This book, which bears the title, "The Silver Cord 
and the Golden Bowl ', received the highest praise 
from eastern critics. Dr. Richard Burton, long the 
literary adviser of the Lothrop Publishing company 
and himself a poet of distinction, said of it: "Miss 
Pierce's volume of ^erse contains genuine poetry. 
Her work is_ artistic, refined, pure and high in qual- 
ity and inspired by worthy ideals. The work should 
be encouraged by all earnest lovers of literature, 
because its ethical influence is strong and the 
reader, while enjoying a poem esthetically, is made 
better by its message." 

Two poems in this little volume have enjoyed 
wide fame. They are the sonnets oh Queen Vic- 
toria and on Browning's "Saul". The sonnet on 
Queen Victoria attained a wide vogue in Great 
Britain and it has been translated into French and 
German. Miss Pierce's latest poems fulfill the 
promise given by those two remarkable sonnets. 
While this author has the poetic gift she has such 
versatility that she finds little time for verse. Her 
short stories are likely to make her name in a field 
where few achieve supremacy. No one in Califor- 
nia better understands the technique of the short 
story and no one can handle a dramatic incident 
more artistically. This fact has been so well recog- 
nized by eastern editors that Miss Pierce has been 
kept busy this winter filling her numerous com- 
missions. 

As a platform speaker Miss Pierce is not less 
brilliant than as a writer. She has a talent for ora- 
tory; she has something to say and she knows how 
to say it, for in all her activities she is an artist. 

One of Miss Pierce's recent poems published in 
an eastern magazine gives an idea of her fine feeling 
and her love of melody: 

In the Flicker of the Firelight on the Wall 

With the flicker of the firelight on the wall. 

I love the morning tender, 

The day's full wakened splendor. 
The stretches where the sunset glories fall; 

But, oh, for my delight, 

Give the comfort of the night 

With the books I long have known, 

And the dear ones, nearer grown 
As we sit in visioned silence, dreaming all; 

With our memories of the past, 

With our future fortunes cast 
In the flicker of the firelight on the wall. 

When the veil of silence rent, 
Gives the sound, in memory blent, 

Of the old familiar voices as they call; 
And the yearned for household faces 
Take once more accustomed places 

In the flicker of the firelight on the wall. 



Pacific Outlook 



4 


Along' 


the Bs\rlbairy Coast 





By LANIER BARTLETT 



From Oran to the city of Algier it is an intensly 
interesting ride of twelve hours by train (and such 
a train!). A magnificent country unfolds, green and 
prolific in the springtime, tan and ripe and sun- 
fragrant in the dry heat of summer, with splendid 
mountains, graceful valeys and — until the sun has 
slaked his thirst too long — replete with hurrying 
little streams. 

Quaint stations are passed by the way and long 
stops at these isolated French settlements give the 
passenger time to study, the picturesque native 
tynes which gather about the loitering train. Here 
he will see the desert Arabs, the coast Moors, the 
native Kabyles, negroes from the South, all in their 
various attires; and the French station agents with 
their long white clothes hanging down from their 
headgear to protect the backs of their necks from 
the insistent sun will remind the stranger of his 
ideal picture of the African explorer. It is an amus- 
ing sight to see two tall, dignified, hooded Arabs, 
types of the desert shieks one sees pictured in 
books, stalk gravely up to each other, shake hands, 
and then each pulling the other toward him, kiss 
his companion on both cheeks. This slow, de- 
liberate formula is never varied when two of these 
men who esteem each other meet. 

The French trains in Africa are. better unde- 
scribed. One of the unique experiences of an Al- 
gerian railway journey is the run for the diner at 
meal time. As the cars have no corridors connect- 
ing the compartments, there is no communication 
between the cars while the train is in motion, un- 
less it is by the dangerous footboard running along 
the sides, similar to those on our old-fashioned 
street cars. So the dining car conductor makes his 
way from car to car along this board long before 
the meal hour and ascertains the number of per- 
sons who desire seats in the diner for the prospec- 
tive meal. To these he gives seat checks, some for 
the first service and some for the second as the 
passenger may desire or the capacity of the diner 
demand, and notifies his patrons that the meal will 
be served immediately after leaving such and such 
a station, which (it is expected) will be reached at 
such and such an hour. This means that when you 
reach this station you must descend and make a 
run for the diner. If the train has lost time, un- 
known to you, since the announcement, and you 
make a run for the diner one station too soon and 
pull yourself aboard just as the engineer pulls the 
throttle, there you must stay, sitting idly at the 
table, much to the displeasure of the waiter (there 
is only one) until the nroper station has been pass- 
ed. And if you complete your meal just as the 
train is leaving some stopping place you cannot 
escape until the next wateY tank is reached, and 
likely as not you will have had to surrender your 
table to the second service .folks who clambered 
aboard where you should have escaped, and will 
have to stand miserably in the corner for long miles 
to come. But then, what can one expect of an 
African railway? It is a pleasant surprise to find 



any sort of a diner at all in the Uarbary country. 

The train winds down into Algier at night and 
the first glimpse that is caught of the brilliant elec- 
tric lights of the French city banked in a crescent 
formation against the hill that pitches suddenly 
into the beautiful little harbor affords a distinct 
shock: for surely this thoroughly European city 
looks very modern and un^African. A big, hand- 
some, well-paved city it is, in its French part ; but 
in time you learn that the old native pirates' city is 
still here, as quaint and crowded and almost as 
dirty as it ever was. 

All through the Tell region of Algeria the splen- 
did roads, the competent policing-and the evidences 




In Old Algier 

of agricultural production arouse an admiration for 
the French colonial system as applied to this great 
colony of Algeria, and this admiration culminates 
in the impressions produced by the modern city of 
Algier. The main or commercial city rises directly 
from the busy harbor's edge and Mustapha Su- 
perieur, the suburb of handsome villas and fashion- 
able hotels where the winter tourists congregate, 
lies on the slope of the hill above and back of the 
commercial and the native cities. The beauty of 
the gardens of this suberb is equalled only in Cali- 
fornia, and indeed, the date and fan palms, cam- 



10 



Pacific Outlook 



phor, pepper, eucalyptus and orange trees and the 
roses and bouganvilleas match Los Angeles to per- 
fection. From here there is a superb view down 
into the pretty harbor, along the edge of which 
innumerable dark natives toil with great, bales on 
their heads, and the eye has free sweep Out across 
the blue Mediterranean, whereon strange craft are 
always plying. 

Of the mysterious, Oriental native Algier, who 
can adequately speak? A glimpse at its history — 
and really few visitors realize how historic are these' 
weird premises — is sufficient to enthrall the imag- 
ination. For centuries- this city was a pest to the 
Christian world and the dictator to all the great 
maritime nations of Europe concerning their com- 
merce in the Mediterranean. If the amount of 
ransom that has been paid from Christian treasuries 
for captured white men and bounty for the privilege 




a jbwess of constantine with the peculiar 
' Mother Goose" Headgear 

of passing through the great Inland Sea could be 
stated in a lump sum it would appall the world. For 
several centuries all the sea-going nations of the 
Occident tamely submitted to or failed in their at- 
tacks upon these seapads, and this gigantic African 
graft came to be considered as a necessary and un- 
avoidable part of the cost of Mediterranean traffic. 
In the middle of the 16th century, Cervantes, the 
eminent Spaniard, author of Don Quixote, was a 
captive in Algier and spent five horrible years of 
the most abject slavery, alternately flayed "to work 
and chained in a noisome cell in the dungeons of 
this historic stronghold. The story of his capture, 
his awful existence for those five years, at times as 
a galley slave, and the desperate attempts that were 
made, so long in vain, to ransom him, form a chap- 
ter of personal history than which there is none 
more interesting in all the records of the past. At 



the time of his captivity there were 25,000 other 
Christian slaves in Algier. 

The history of the Algerine system of piracy is 
most interesting and romantic. In 1505 Ferdinand 
of S'pamt sent a powerful fleet against the Infidels 
of Algeria and succeeded in capturing the city of 
Oran. It took the Spaniards four years more to 
force their way into the city of Algier. The latter 
powerful city chafed sorely under the Spanish yoke, 
and the inhabitants secretly despatched an embassy 
to Turkey, where they negotiated with the no- 
torious pirate and devastator, Barbarossa, to help 
them deliver their city from the Europeans, No 
sooner had the latter accomplished the dislodge- 
ment of the Spanish and reestablished Moham- 
medan domination over Algier than he murdered 
the Prince of Algier in his own palace, proclaimed 
himself ruler, and set about to perfect the abom- 
inable system of piracy which soon became the 
curse of all Christian lands until a newborn little 
nation of the far away New World decided to send 
some of Its sailor huskies clear across the Atlantic 
just on purpose to kick the "Algerine" into smith- 
ereens. And it took these careless fellows only a 
few days to raise the curse of centuries from dilly- 
dallying Europe. 

Finally the Spaniards got hold of Barbarossa and 
beheaded him, but his brother, Hayradin, took up 
the game with a vengeance, and still further enlist- 
ing the aid of Turkey, which country appointed 
him a Pasha, made the fleet of Algier a worse 
scourge than it had been before. He caused the 
present harbor of Algier to be outlined by a great 
mole for the protection of the pirate fleet, and used 
30,000 Christian captives three years in building it. 
At length Carlos V of Spain organized an expedi- 
tion and sailed against the city with one hundred 
and twenty ships, twenty galleys and 30,000 men. 
So great was the desire of the Christian world that 
this undertaking against the single city of Algier 
succeed that Pope Paul III granted remission of 
sin and a crown of martyrdom to all who should 
fall in battle or be made prisoners by the Algerians. 
While attacking the city a storm arose and de- 
stroyed eighty-six ships and fifteen galleys of the 
Spanish force with their crews. All who escaped 
drowning were cast ashore and enslaved by the 
Mohammedans. Once more Europe was staggered 
by this one African city. 

After this the city was attacked at different dates 
by the English, Venetians, Dutch and French again ; 
but without permanent success. At last the pirates 
actually crossed the Mediterranean and harried the 
coast of France. When the French fleet returned 
the compliment by again bombarding Algier, the 
Dey murdered the French prisoners in his posses- 
sion, and reserving the most prominent one shot 
him out of a mortar in the direction of the French 
fleet. 

Thus it may be seen that the French have long 
been at war with the Barbary coast; and it seems 
poetic justice that this nation owns the whole of 
Algeria, and now is very stealthily proceeding to 
add Morocco to her African empire. 

But it was not the French who shackled the Bar- 
bary pirate. 

In the meantime a nation had been born over in 
America, and though its home was very far from 
the Barbary Coast, the venturesome spirit of its 
victorious people befor® long brought them, too, 



Pacific Outlook 



11 



trafficking into the Indigo Sea. Straightway down 
came the pirates onto the Stars and Stripes and 
held the new flag up for an annual tax. The 
youngster nation was just then too unprepared to 
resist and for a while the Americans submitted to 
the infamous tax. But these Westerners had t lie 
tear neither of Mack men nor of tradition in their 
nature, and the fact that the ships of Christian 
Europe had been the sport of the fierce blackguards 
for so long that their owners considered it all as a 
matter of course, "cut no ice" with them. They 
ii. • reason why they should become a party to 
such a degrading tradition as this; and before long 
this new little nation of the faraway had delivered 
the deathblow to the monster of the Mediterranean 
which had so lout;- fattened on the frightened sea- 
folk of Europe. 

For some years the United States had to submit 
to the " Ugerine." In the one year of 1795 Con- 
gress paid to the ruler of Algier $992,463.25 as 
ransom for American captives and as a peace of- 
fering. Besides, our government gave in addition, 
as a present to the Dey, $17,000 worth of stores and 
ammunition, ami was compelled to agree to pay a 
tribute of $21,000 a year thereafter, and $20,000 on 
presentation of a consul at court. At this time there 
were -till 2.200 Christian captives in Algier. 

This was too galling for Americans to stand for 
long, but about the time we were strong enough to 
strike we were plunged into the War of 1812. 
Finally this was off our hands, and our little navy 
felt full of light. Just about then the pirates made 
a raid toward the Strait and captured ten Ameri- 
can merchantmen. They chose their time badly. 
The United States was in no mood to parley. An 
ominous calm set in and lasted for just the length 
of time it took a little American fleet to cross the 
Atlantic and penetrate the forbidden- waters. June 
15, 1815, Decatur trapped the bulk of the Algerine 
fleet in the bay of Algier, destroyed it, fought his 
way at the head of his bluejackets into the vile city. 
and forcing an entrance into the presence of the 
bullying Dey, compelled him, within three hours 
from the time he had landed, to sign, "without gift 
or present", on pain of having his entire city re- 
duced to debris by the American guns, a treaty 
abolishing forever all tribute or presents from the 
United States to His Nibs, the Dey of Algier, agree- 
ing to the payment of indemnity for all American 
vessels captured that ear, the liberation of all Chris- 
tian captives of whatsoever nation, and' arranging 
that thereafter no Christian captives of war of 
whatsoever nation should be enslaved. Tunis and 
Tripoli having played into the hands of the English 
dining the War of 1812. Decatur proceeded to their 
ports and paid their rulers the compliments of the 
American people in exactly the same manner. Thus 
at one blow from the energetic Xew World every 
dungeon of the Barbary Coast was emptied of 
anguishing Christian captives — not Americans only, 
but cf whatsoever nation — and the powerful gov- 
ernments of Europe were given a suggestion as to 
how to rid themselves of the awful incubus of the 
"Algerine". as the system was called. The Stars 
and Stripes never again were molested by the Bar- 
bary States, and by 1829 every seafaring- nation 
had cast off the yoke which it had worn so long. 

These bits of history and other startling pass- 
ages in its career from the times of the Romans 
and then of blackhearted ?>arbarossa and later the 
crusades of Charles V. down to the war which fol- 



low ed the French invasion in 1830, make this 

vividly interesting lo the traveler, in addition to 

its more tangible interests of beautiful location. 

colorful life and mysterious, feline-footed women 
with veiled faces (but such eyes, always to be 

-ecu!) and looseh pantalooued limbs, flitting 
through the intense African sunlight and shadow. 
Anil Oh, the black-blue Algerian night as seen 
From the dreamily odorous, nightengaled gardens 

1 Mustapha on the I [eights, or from the ruined 
battlements of the 1 ley's old palace, with the weird 
pirate capital of a fiendish past crouched, sub- 
missive now. between the upper and the nether 
Christian cities — 

But wondrous Constantine is next, and the morn- 
ing start must he an early one. 

From 6:30 a. m., until 9:30 p. m., the funny 
French train will jerk you along through a land 
of enchantment— up from the costal strip back to 
the inner edge of that cultivable region called the 
Tell, and then along through rugged -gorges, over 
cascaded ravines (if it be in the season of spring 
waters) across strips of desert and down valleys 
between the inner and the outer Atlas, whereon the 




Looking from the Heights down over the 
City and Bay of Ai.gii-r 

snow lies until the season of the heat of heats. 
Bedouin encampments and grazing camels are con- 
stant' delights to the Western eye. 

Constantine is one of the most impressively lo- 
cated cities in all the world. It crouches on top of 
a gigantic island of rock rising, not out of the sea, 
but out of a great interior valley — a magnificent 
valley in the springtime, stained with poppies and 
horizoned with lurinp- purple vistas. The precipice 
is sheer on all sides, and where the Gorge of the 
Rhummel cracks the vast rock away from the main 
plateau the drop is a frightful one to the little 
stream that tumbles through the shade at the bot- 
tom of the slit. The location reminds one of our 
own wonderful Indian pueblo of Acoma, in New 
Mexico. 

The romantic vicissitudes of this very ancient 
city have been too many to describe in a few lines. 
The old Arab, or native town, is built in part on the 
ruins of the Roman military stronghold, and now 
the modern French section is pushing on over what 
will be some day the ruins of the Arabic. The 
great rock always has been the site of an important 
military post, by whatever hands it has been held. 
and Constantine is now the French division head- 
quarters for eastern Algeria, just as Algier is the 



12 



Pacific Outlook 



central post and Oran, on the Moroccan frontier, 
the western outpost. It took a French army of 
20,000 men two years to capture the rock-crowning 
city, and the first foothold gained on the massive 
cliffs by the soldiers of the tri-color was secured 
romantically, it is said, by means of a great rope 
whereby ladies of the royal harem and their escort 
were lowered over the precipice below the Sultan's 
palace in the hope of escaping before the sorely-be- 
sieged stronghold should ultimately fall. 

Many of the women of Constantine are beautiful, 
and among the most picturesque are the little 
Jewesses, who dress in a costume peculiar to their 
kind in this vicinity. It consists of a single robe 
cut something after the style of the modern night- 
gown-like "Empire" dress, and a ridiculous, pointed 
cap, reminding one of the headgear usually dis- 
played in pictures of Mother Goose while on her 
broomstick peregrinations through the air. It is 
worn generally tipped to one side, quite coquet- 
tish ly. 

Constantine is the old Cirta of the Romans, who 
took the name, meaning "city", from the Phoenic- 
ians. It was once the great city of Numidia and 
the residence of the kings of Massyli. In the war 
of Maxentius against Alexander it was laid in 
ruins, and from the fact of its restoration in 313 
A. D., by the Roman Emperor, Constantine, it de- 
rives it's present name. It's redoutable military 
record is emphasized by the fact that it was the 
one Roman stronghold that did not fall before the 
Vandal invasion of the 5th century. Later, how- 
ever, it fell into the hands of the Saracens, who 
were the fellows who put the Vandals "to the bad." 
The Kasbah, or castle of Constantine, in the 
northern corner of the town, is partly of Roman 
construction. The mosque of Souk-el-Rejel, now 
the French church of Notre Dame des Sept Dou- 
leurs, was built in 1143. The Dejama-Kebir mosque 
occupies the site of the old Roman pantheon. 

Regular caravans arrive in Constantine from the 
far interior via Biskra and Tuggurt, and the sight 
of the lines of camels and weary mules toiling up 
into the sky-city is of intenest interest. 

From Constantine eastward to Tunis it is an- 
other splendid journey of fourteen hours by fail, 
some of it through truly beautiful mountain "scen- 
ery. Tunis is flat and unlovely in comparison with 
the natural endowments of the Algerian cities, but 
the details of its Oriental architecture are especially 
fine, and the bazaars are the most extensive of all 
the Coast. From Tunis an interesting drive of 
about ten miles will take one to the site of ancient 
Carthage and the later Roman citv, the ruins of 
which are still to be seen. The little artificial eal- 
ley harbors of the Romans are plainlv discernible 
down below, on the coast of Gulf of Tunis. 

Tunisia is supposed to possess an independent 
government, but the controlling power really is 
French, and French money passes as readily as 
the supposed native coinage. A few moments on 
the awning-shaded terrace of the Grand Cafe du 
Casino, looking down the broad, handsome Avenue 
Tules Ferry, with its double row of beautiful trees 
in the center and the trolley cars under them, will 
convince the stranger that here also the clever hand 
of the Gaulshas been permanently laid. Moroccotoo, 
bids fair to be his in time, for the present French 
occupation of Casa Blanca and vicinity is merely 
a repetition of the invasion of Algeria which ended 
in its permanent occupation; and when France first 




25% 



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Overcoats and 

Rain Coats 



These are Chesterfield garments in a wide variety of 
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variety of garni' nts in stock. Now all are offered at 
one-fourth off regu ar prices. 

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Broad-way, Cor. 3rd 



' Not Connected With Other Stores » 



UR NEW YEAR POLICY 



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E. E. DRYDEN 328 West Fifth St. 



Wayne Vibratory Institute 

315-16-17 LissnerBUg. - 524 South Spring Street 
Los Angeles, Cai 

IS AN INSTITUTION where scientific VIBRATORY MAS- 
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It has been clearly demonstrated, that in nervous disorders and 
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We have the best equipped treatment rooms in Los Angeles. 
Experienced nurse in attendance to assist with ladies and children. 

Hours 9 to 5. Evenings and Sundays by appointment. 
Home Phone F 5178. 



Pacific Outlook 



13 



entered Algier to punish offenses against French- 
men nnly promised England she would 
never permanently occupy the land. The last free 
anil independent government of North Africa, tl-at 
of the Moors, is doomed; soon the Christian pall 
own the remnant of that people which once almost 
inundated Europe. 

If the traveler should wish to discontinue his 
Barbary jaunt hero, he may 1 oard an Italian steamer 
(none to • good) at Tunis and after a trans-Mediter- 
ranean sail of two nights and a dav, with a lew 
hours at quaint Trapani and busy Palermo, in Sicily, 
en route, land in Naples. 

* * * 

"Juliet!" 

The West Adams street car line crosses Romeo 
street, out in the southwest, and with a delectable 
>e of the eternal fitness of things the same fel- 
low who named Romeo street named the next street 
Juliet. 

A few evenings ago a very prim and proper look- 
ing young lady, a stranger to those romantic parts, 
was riding out to West Adams Heights, and as the 
Shakespearian region was approached she was left 
sitting inside the car, near the rear door, alone save 
for two gentlemen at the further end of the opposite 
bench. 

"Juliet!" bawded the conductor, with unusual dis- 
tinctness. 

"Sir!" replied the prim lady passenger, in frigid 
tones, glaring toward the conductor. 

"Juliet?" repeated the carman in a softer, more 
personal tone, advancing inquiringly to the door 
and raising his hand to the bellcord. 

"How dare you, sir!" demanded the lady, rising. 
"Let me off, immediately". 

The conductor pulled the bellcord. Not having 
caught the full significance of all the lady had s^tid, 
he remarked pleasantly, as she swept toward the 
door : "I had an idea that your's was Juliet, Miss". 

The flustered female glared at the little man with 
renewed indignation. 

"Sir, you have gone too far; I shall report you!" 
she cried. 

"Oh, was it Romeo you wanted?" asked the con- 
fused nickelodeon, meekly. 

"K there were any men on this car you would be 
lynched for this insinuation!" shrieked Miss Juliet 
Somethinsrorother, indicating the direction of her 
grinning fellow passengers, and leaped from the car. 

* * * 

An Apache Temer 

Of the surviving scouts and. Indian fighters few 
are more widely renowned than Captain Smith A. 
Simpson, of Cimarron, the friend and associate of 
Kit Carson and Aloys Scheurich. His story is brief- 
ly told in the Albuquerque Citizen. Captain Simp- 
son was born in New York City in 1833 and came 
over to New Mexico in 1862, when 29 years of age, 
and settled in Taos county when that county em- 
braced what is now Colfax county and very much 
more. He served through the Ute and Apache wars, 
spent a year as government express rider, went to 
old Mexico and mixed up in many revolutions, and 
then returned, to the United States to fight the 
Apaches. As captain in the American army, he was 
the main agent in the taming of the Apaches in 
Arizona where he came in close contact with King 



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900 Auditorium Blcl B . 



Tel. F 5024 



HIGH CLASS INVESTMENT 
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315 S.Hill Street . 



properties 



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216 S. BROADWAY 



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Paid Up Capital $150,000 
Realty Stocks Bonds 

JXCember Los Angeles Slock Exchange 
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REAL ESTATE— MINES 
GENERAL INSURANCE 

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Home Ex. 501 
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Shaving Outfits, Pocket and 
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14 



Pacific Outlook 



Wolsey of Prescott, an unsung- hero of the border 
who did more than any other individual to prevent 
the entire extermination of the whites in Arizona 
in the 60's. One of the memorable Indian fights 
that Simpson recalls occurred in 1864 on the very 
ground where the thriving mining camp of Globe 
now stands. Kink Wolsey with about eighty miners 
and mountaineers had run into several times their 
number of Apache Indians. Finding the savages 
too strong he sent to Captain Simpson, 160 miles 
away, for help. Wolsey managed to keep off the 
savages until Simpson's arrival with the much- 
needed aid. Then the two combined their forces 
and went in to win. After a hard fight the Indians 
were routed, leaving many dead and two braves and 
one squaw prisoners. The position of the Indians 
had been admirable from a defensive standpoint — al- 
most inaccessible and well supplied with water, al- 
though there was no other water within thirty miles. 
It was plain that this would always be a retreat and 
lurking place for the savages, unless something was 
done to keep them away. It is a well-known fact 
that the Apaches will never make their camp in a 
place where any of their number have been hanged. 
Being an army officer, Simpson could not openly 
countenance the hanging of prisoners. So he turned 
them over to Wolsey, and hastened away. Wolsey 
turned the squaw loose and hanged the bucks to 
the nearest tree. It was "good business" as the 
Apaches ever after shunned the spot. Captain 
Simpson was the friend and associate of Kit Carson 
and L. B. Maxwell when they lived in Cimarron. 
They all three used to go fishing and hunting to- 
gether, and in fact, were boon companions. Captain 
Simpson finally resigned from the army and return- 
ed to Taos where he has continued to reside, except- 
ing for occasional expeditions as long as there was 
any demand for services of that kind. He can now 
and then be seen riding through Cimarron in going 
to and from other parts of the territory. He is well 
preserved at 74 years of age for one who has seen 
so much of the rough side of life; still strong and 
vigorous, and it is pleasing to his many friends to 
see that he is able to pass the evening of life so de- 
lightful among his children and grandchildren. 

* * * 
Living Fish, on Steamers 

An interesting departure has been recently made 
on the "Amerika" of the Hamburg-American Line 
by taking on board a special tank for keeping about 
a ton of living river fish for table use, says the 
Scientific American. 

It was an interesting question whether or not the 
fish would stand the fatigue of the sea voyage. A 
large tank of 5.85 cubic yards capacity (14.76 feet in 
length, 3.28 in width, and 3.28 in height) had been 
constructed on the boat deck of the steamer. This 
tank, which is of iron, and divided into two com- 
partments, was protected against the escape of the 
water in case of heavy oscillations by roofing', as 
well as by perforated sheet-metal partitions similar 
to bulkheads. The two main compartments of the 
tank are intended, one for housing trout, and the 
other for larger fish. 

As this experiment has been entirely successful, 
ocean steamers will in future be able to carry fresh 
fish instead of the fish preserved on ice, as much as 
two tons being readily stored in tanks of the kind 
described. 




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Manufacturing Jewelers 
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PHONES: Exch. 303. 



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South 303. 



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The Gentlemen's Tailor 



314 W. Third Street 



Pacific Outlook 



15 



The Saloons and Politics 

The Rev. S. II. Tafl of Sawtelle lias written to 
Abbott Kinney a letter in which he discusses the 
question of prohibition from a viewpoint which is 
nn taken by those who regard the saloon as a 
most potent factor in politics. Mr. Taft makes a 
mg argument in favor of prohibition. 1 1 is letter 
in full is here reproduced : 

Sawtelle. Dec. 22, 1907. 
Abbott Kinney. Esq., Los VngCles, Cal. 
Dear Sir: 

The daily press represents that you have said, 
"If I must choose between saloons that meddle 
with and corrupt politics and prohibition, I shall 
choose prohibition." 

Now if you will gave the question thus stated a 
few moments of careful thought, you will see that 
the saloon is the child of corrupt politics; that it 
has no existence until created by political action, 
since the Supreme Court has declared that no one 
has a natural right to engage in the saloon business. 
You and I cannot engage in the buisness until we 
have obtained a special permit to do so, and this 
permit can only be obtained by legislation enacted 
by a political party into whose hands the adminis- 
tration of the government has been committed, and 
every thoughtful person knows that this permit in- 
volves the authorizing of one citizen to tempt, de- 
bauch and rob other citizens. Now no legislator 
or municipality could grant such license, except by 
the violation of every principle of our government 
as represented by the national Constitution, and the 
legislature that provides for granting such license, ' 
receiving a fee therefor, transforms the government 
established by the Constitution from a protector of 
society to a protector of the criminal class, thus not 
only discrowning it of all moral power, but making 
it a potential teacher of immorality. 

Those who talk about taking the saloon out of 
politics in any other way but by killing it discredit 
either their intelligence or their integrity. 

The saloon being thus the creation of a corrupt . 
political party, con live only so long as such a party 
continue to license and sustain it. 

If what Governor Dawson of West Virginia lately 
said is true, whay should you withhold from at 
once choosing prohibition, and give the cause of 
righteousness civil government the benefit your po- 
tential influence? The following is Governor Daw- 
son's testimony regarding the saloon : 

"Do men talk of graft? It is the saloon that fur- 
nishes the scene and atmosphere where bribery is 
secure from interference. Do men deplore the rule 
of corrupt politicial bosses? It is the saloon that 
rallies the mass of venal and unpatriotic voters, who 
constitute the phalanx of the bosses' power. Has 
crime become rampant upon the street? The saloon 
is the refuge of the criminals. Does vice seek pro- 
tection ? The saloons affect the agreement with 
the policemen who are familiar with its dark se- 
crets and comrades of its debased fraternity. Do 
gamblers wish to ply their demoralizing trade 
among the yonug? The saloon affords them not 
only the shield, but brings them the susceptible 
patronage of inexperienced youths. Is there a 
movement afoot for any measure of civic better- 
ment? Its opponents foregather in the saloon and if 
any chicanerv can beat the better will of the ma- 
jority, the fraud will be devised in the saloon. 

These are no wild charges from crazed fanatics, 
but a statement of conditions that can be demon- 



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lo 



Pacific Outlook 



strated out of any year's history in any American 
municipality of importance. To emblazon this re- 
sponsibility of the saloon so manifestly before the 
eyes of the public that it cannot secure the notice 
of men, who thinks at all, or be ignored by any 
person who professes the slightest concern for pure 
civic life, is the immediate task of the saloon's 
enemy, and it is a task that should be discharged 
without rant, or railing, but simply with calm re- 
sort to the inevitable logic of common experience in 
America. 

The contest to the death between civic righteous- 
ness and the saloon is on, and either our free gov- 
ernment or the saloon is doomed to perish. Which 
shall it be? 

I rejoice in the assurance that the day of re- 
demption from this deadliest foe of Christian civili- 
zation is near at hand, and the sooner every thought- 
ful, conscientious citizen takes a definite position of 
antagonism to the saloon, the sooner this glad day 
of redemption will dawn. 

S. H. TAFT. 

* * * 
General Topics 

The Chamber of Mines will hold its annual elec- 
tion January 22. General John R. Mathews, presi- 
dent, has appointed as a committee on nominations : 
J. M. Schneider, Fielding J. Stilson, O. M. Souden, 
H. P. Usher, M. J. Monette. Owing to the pressure 
of other business. General Mathews has declined 
to be a candidate for re-election. 

Statistics show that last month the volume of 
first class travel from eastern points to Southern 
California was the same as last year. The Santa 
Fe had an actual increase of business and all the 
other roads enjoyed a good patronage. 

President John Willis Baer, of Occidental Col- 
lege, has received from Dr. George R. Parkin, Sey- 
mour House, London, authority to make arrange- 
ments for the Rhodes Scholarship examinations to 
be held in California at the University of California, 
Berkeley, at the University at Stanford and in 
Southern California at Occidental. 

Mrs. Adelaide Tichnor, Mrs. William Schilling 
and Mrs. Jennie Reeves of Long Beach have been 
legislated out of their offices as members of the 
library board, by the passing of a special charter 
which debars women from holding office. 

The old mining camp of Calico, San Bernardino 
county, is likely to have another boom. A company 
of capitalists has been organized for the purpose of 
developing the rich mines near the camp. The di- 
rectors are C. A. Burcham of Los Angeles, John D. 
Ackerman of Oakland, R. L. Burcham, Ward Chap- 
man, W. E. Youle, H. C. Laux of Los Angeles, and 
A. L. Drew of San Bernardino. 

* * * 

I Believe — 

That the girl who carefully dons her prettiest 
openwork hose on a windy day has no right to pray, 
"Lead us not into temptation." 

That when we consider the kind of people who 
generally are responsible for race suicide, we need 
not feel so bad about it as Teddy does. 

That if many children were less like their par- 
ents the parents would have less cause to complain 
about them. 

That feminine modesty at the seashore and under 
ordinary circumstances may be the same thing, but 
blessed if I understand it. 



That some men may be self-made, but if so, the 
Lord is relieved of a frightful responsibility. 

That if the architects of the hats some women 
wear are not inmates of insane asylums they have 
not yet reached home. 

That it takes a pretty choice parson to preach a 
good sermon on Sunday and live it the rest of the 
week. 

That, notwithstanding the old saying, Love is 
so far from being blind that he frequently can see 
merits where none exist. — Waterhouse, in Sacra- 
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Pacific Outlook 



17 




"1* €>" 

By Eyesandears 



The "Church of the Honest Man" — I have found 
it. Please notify Diogenes. Tis a little church, not 
"around the corner." hut in the middle of a block ; 
and so unpretentious is it that you could pass it 
easily, unless you were looking for a church, as I 
was. by chance, last Sunday morning-. "What 
block?" Read first, then I'll tell you. 

I love the "house beautiful." especially where one 
is to invite a Divine Guest. Don't you? This little 
church is all of that, inside. Its atmosphere is rest- 
ful and reverent, because true art has controlled light 
ami color, and fashioned and placed materials, all 
in the interests of comfort during a holy hour. One 
is not restless here. One's timid, starving soul ven- 
tures out for a bit of food. There's actually comfort 
and no stiffness on the platform, too. It's low, 
broad, roomy and beautifully banked in ferns and 
flowers. They put the minister in the center, of 
course, but he's bothered by no formal furniture, 
and his choir with organ is right there at his side — 
home style, if you like. 

Xo "country" about this, either, mark you. Train- 
ed city singers, these, though acting more as if they 
were in church than many paid choirs I have seen. 
And the organ "sent its angels out" as well from 
the pipes set modestly at the side as though they 
had been massed hideously in the rear and above. 

All the good music doesn't come from the choir, 
though. It's in the voice of the minister, a manly, 
friendly tone without an intone. It's in the cordial, 
hearty murmur of the responsive service. It's in the 
air, as if the organ's angels floating there were not 
content to "fan the cheeks of care and doubt," but, 
in sheer joy of the place, were keeping up a sweet 
undertone of restful harmony. Also it's in the good 
old hymns, sung as they ought to be, by the congre- 
gation, standing. Truly, these serve the Lord with 

song. 

Yet in all this, pleasant, even hallowing though it 
was, I could find no reason for the presence of so 
many real men— not boys or grandfathers— in this 
church. They don't hold men as a rule, you know. 
The reason soon appeared, however. 

The minister picked up a piece of paper and read 
some names. "These," he said, "have expressed a 
wish to join us today. There may be others present. 
Will those whose names I have read, and any others 
who wish, come forward?" 

They came, some dozen or more fine people. 
Then he came down off the platform, and, standing 
there with them, simply, face to face, this is what 
he said: "Friends, we of this church are just a lot 
of simple folk, trying to make the world a little bet- 



ter because we have spent our breathing spell here. 
We ask to place no restrictions on your mind as to 
wdiat you shall believe, only on your life as to what 
you shall be. We care not for creed so the aim be 
pure and the aspiration high. We would rather be 
known as The Church of the Honest Man than as 
the exponent of any theology." Thus with a few 
words and no ceremony, he took them into fellow- 
ship. Rings true, doesn't it? Men like it. 

Then he went back to his place and talked to us 
about "Swearing Off and On." He didn't want us 
to "swear off," but he did want us to "swear on." 
We should be so busy doing something worth while 
and "pressing on" that we'd have no time to think of 
the past. "Forget it and get busy" would be the 
street summary of his sermon. Good working doc- 
trine, that ! 

He's a giant neither in stature nor in intellect, 
this man, yet he is helpful, very. He's so sincere 
that I could feel him pulling me, and few ministers 
ever did that. I knew then why the men were there. 
Though he calls his congregation "just simple folk," 
you'll go far before you find a finer assemblage, 
judged by worth-while standards ; and I take it 
there's the measure of the man. 

Yes, good reader, I did promise to tell you where 
The Church of the Honest Man is. Let me do it by 
talking to the minister. 

Burt Estes Howard, First Unitarian church, 925 
South Flower, you, sir, gave to me, a stranger, a 
message of great comfort and cheer. I would give 
it back to you. If you could touch me, who have 
not yet been held by any church, you are touching 
many who do not tell you so. No wonder you have 
gathered fine people together and that their faces 
show they are content. All in good time your 
sphere of influence will widen, and to you at the 
end will come the guerdon, not only "Well done," 
but "much done, thou good and faithful servant." 

* * * 
Aroused Him 

The doctor bent over the dying man and took his 
hand. 

"I am afraid the end is approaching," he said. 
"Your circulation is at a low ebb." 

With a herculean effort the man sat up in bed. 
"You're a liar!" he shouted. "It went up to 80,000 
last week and I can show you the books to prove 
it!" 

And the great editor fell dead. — Cleveland Leader. 

* * * 
Naturally 

Weggie — I say, old chappie, the papah says there 
will bea lot of meteors this month. How do these 
astronomer Johnnies know that, what? Willie — 
Deah me. how dense you are! They look in the 
almanac." — Cleveland Leader. 



18 



Pacific Outlook 



Sordid Disillusionment 

In a sequel just come to light in Los Angeles of 
one of those romantic, quick-acquaintance court- 
ships, there is a good lesson for 'the girl who is 
susceptible to sudden attractions. Likewise it em- 
phasizes the necessity of a law making it obligatory 
upon a couple intending to marry to publish the 
banns at least two weeks before a license be 
granted. 

The eirl whose sordid disillusionment points the 
moral in this instance was the daughter of doting 
parents who were in the position to gratify her 
every desire. After a year in society she became 
engaged to a fine young fellow, one of the many 
suitors her charms attracted, with the understand- 
ing they were to be married as soon as he completed 
his college course at the end of two years. He went 
back to his studies in an eastern institution, while 
she remained here with her parents. 

One night at a large party she met another man. 
Presumably it was a case of "affinity". That is 
what they told their friends, or rather, that is what 
they told her friends. The young man did not 
know many people here being a newcomer. He 
was good-looking and seemed to wear the right kind 
of clothes and had a very suave manner and that 
was about all the girl, knew about him. At any 
rate they were married the next day and the note 
to the man in the east breaking the engagement, 
was not written until she had become the legal wife 
of another. 

She said "I don't care what Harry is or where he 
came from. .He is all that is noble to me and I 
love him." 

How noble Harry was, the poor girl found out. 
She learned later that on the day he married her 
he had just three dollars, borrowed from a friend. 
And the bridal home he took her to was a room in 
an ordinary lodging-house, loaned by the same 
obliging friend. "Harry", it developed, was a waiter 
by profession, and worse than that, a waiter out of 
a job. 

By the kindness of her father they manage to 
live. "Harry" alone could not be equal to taking 
care of the foolish, romantic girl, who saw in him 
her soul-mate. She is living here now, but as far 
removed from her old circle as if she were on the 
other side of the globe. She married a man who 
was not her kind and all her self-sacrifice cannot 
raise him to her level. She has lost caste and what 
has she gained? Love? 

* * * 

Going After Japs 

Some of the merchants of Fresno have just been 
notified by the Labor Council of that city that a 
boycott has been levied against them until such time 
as they discharge any Japanese they may have in 
their employ. The boycott has been in effect for 
over a week, and union men have reported that they 
were forbidden to buy anything of the offending 
merchants under penalty of a $5 fine. 

* * * 

"Wise Sleeper 

The Vicar — I was surprised to see your husband 
walk out in the middle of my sermon last Sunday. 
Mrs. Jones — You must really forgive him — he's a 
somnambulist, and walks in his sleep, you know. — 
London Opinion. 



317-325 a&SlItt 1 314-322 

ScBhoadkav -'' ^Q.^:-':' - ■' So.HiLi, Street 



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Zhe Store Beautiful 

Our Great 

Clearance 




Is Now Going On. 

The large crowd that attended the opening of 
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"Ville's" methods of conducting a sale 

We are 



Stock 

All odds and ends left from the season's large 
selling will be closed out rapidly. 



Repair 



ss off Cost 



Bargains will beckon you from all sections of this 
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Don't put off until tomorrow what you can buy 
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today. 

Only a Clearance Sale can produce such sharp 
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FURS 

D. BOIMOFF, - FURRIER 

Invites the ladies of Los Angeles to visit his beauti- 
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largest stock of read-to-wear fur garments and lat- 
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also equipped with a large repairing and remodeling 
department. 

D. BONOFF, Furrier 

324 South Broadway Los Angeles, Cal. 



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Pacific Outlook 



19 




Los Angeles is favored this season as never before 
in the number of literary stars who are making a 
visit here. There is Mrs. Ella Wheeler Wilcox, who 
has been so feted since her arrival that she and Mr. 
Wilcox have postponed their Hawaiian trip until 
the end of the month, in order to accept some of the 
invitations that have been showered upon them. A 
luncheon was given tor Mrs. Wilcox Friday by Mrs. 
( ). E. Farish. of 2193 West Adams street. 

Another writer in our midst is Miss Mary E. Phil- 
lips, author of childrens' stories and a magazine illus- 
trator as well, who arrived last week from Boston 
to be the guest of her brother, T. W. Phillips, 2215 
Harvard Boulevard. Mrs. Randall Hutchison gave 
a musical in her honor, and will entertain again for 
the talented young woman. 

The creat r .if the "bonneted babies," Miss Bertha 
Corbett, of Chicago, has been here several days. The 
quaint and original studies of children, that brought 
the artist a wide fame, were the result of an inspira- 
tion growing out of a challenge given one evening 
in a group of which Miss Corbett was one, to pro- 
duce a figure of interest which would not show the 
face. The sunbonneted babies resulted and they are 
known wherever magazine readers are found. 

Mrs. Carter Harrison, whose tales for children 
have delighted many readers, the grown-up as well 
as the little ones, is another of our winter guests. 



( )f much interest to Los Angeles society is the 
news of the engagement of Miss Anna Chapman, 
daughter of Judge and Mrs. John S. Chapman, to 
Envin A. McMillan, United States paymaster at 
Mare Island. In far-off Guam, while on a South Sea 
trip several months ago, Miss Chapman met the 
man who won her heart, but the secret was not di- 
vulged to Los Angeles friends until the announce- 
ment of the engagement this week. Miss Chapman 
is a strikingly fine-looking young woman, and to 
other accomplishments adds that of a well-.trained 
singing voice. The wedding will take place at the 
Chapman home in the early part of February, but 
before that there will be several affairs given in 
honor of Miss Chapman, the first of which will be 
one by Mrs. Edward L. Dolieny, of Chester Place. 



Two brides-to-be were the object of felicitations 
from a number of friends at a card party given last 
week by Mrs. Florence Collins Porter at her home, 
"Inglenook Cottage," in South Pasadena. The af- 
fair was to announce the engagement of her daugh- 
ter. Miss Florence Spaulding Porter, to Willis Nor- 
ton Blood, and also to present to Los Angeles so- 
ciety Miss Vetna Oak, niece of Mrs. Porter, who is 
visiting her. The Other prospective bride-to-be is 
Miss May E. Fish of Boston, whose engagement to 
Henry G. Tardy, a San Francisco attorney, was but 
recently announced, and who is also visiting Mrs. 
Porter. The guests included: Mrs. Norman Marsh, 
Mrs. John Schenck, Jr., Mrs. William Shoebottom, 
Mrs. Yalvelee I). McDonald, Mrs. Harley Packer. 



Mrs. Sutton. Mrs. Frank Vale, Mrs. If. M. Ross, 
Mrs. Charlton Brain of New York. Mrs. M. E. Hack- 
er. Mrs. I. aura Haines. Mrs. Deuces, Mis. R. W. 
Avery, Mrs. Clara W. Greis, Miss Florence Gifford, 
Miss Bertha Moore, Miss Bess Filbert, Miss Ander- 
son, Miss Luce. Miss Helen Boise, Miss Katherine 
Harding, Miss Fay Pendleton. Miss Evelyn Alex- 
ander. Miss Mary T. Fish of Boston, Miss Florence 
I'armelee and Miss Clara Parmelee. 



Quite the most important affair of the week from 
a social standpoint was the Bachelors' Assembly at 
Kramer's Tuesday evening, when three hundred 
gathered for the annual dance of this popular club 
of unattached men. Mr. Reichel of Hotel Alexandria 




Miss May Fish of Boston, whose bngagemenr to 
Henry G. Tardy of San Francisco was 

RECENTLY ANNOUNCED 

had charge of the decorating and the result was 
a scene of beauty that set a new standard for Los 
Angeles entertainers. The ladies who acted as pa- 
tronesses were Mrs. I. N. Van Nuys, Mrs. W. M. 
Garland, Mrs. Hancock Banning. Mrs. Randolph 
H. Miner. Mrs. Milo M. Potter and Mrs. Granville 
MacGowan. The governing board of the club is 
composed of Messrs. Harry Kay, Will Wolters, 
Russell Taylor, Gurney Newlin, Arthur Dodworth, 
Harold Cook. Earl Cowan, Arthur Bumiller, Charles 
Sexier, Earl Anthony, Louis Vetter and Carlton 
Burke. 

The membership of the association is composed of 



20 



Pacific Outlook 



the following young men: Harry Anderson, Earle C. 
Anthony, Carleton F. Burke, E. C. Bosbyshell, Roy E. 
Burbank, Capt. William Banning, Arthur Bumiller,. 
Winthrop Blackstone, Frank M. Brown, Charles H. 
Burnett, Earl Cowan, Harold S. Cook, Walter Clark, 
William K. Crawford, Bert Campbell, Henry Daly, 
Arthur A. Dodworth, Richard J. Dillon, A. d'Heur, 
Dr. John C. Firbert, Robert P. Flint, Edwin J. Grant, 
Selwyn Graves, George Ennis, M. L. Graff, Charles H. 
Hastings, Volney E. Howard, Norwood W. Howard, 
Barbee S. Hook, Charles Hopper, Reginald D. John- 
son, L. W. Jutten, Harry B. Kay, Karl C. Klokke, 
Philo Lindley, John Llewellyn, Cloyd Lott, Don A. Mc 
Gilvray.Maynard McFie, William M. Mines, Ygnacio 
L. Mott, William B. Merwin, Leroy Macomber, W. R. 
Miller. Dr. A. J. Murrieta, Gurney E. Newlin, Charles 
E. Orr, Gregory Perkins, jr., O. C. Pickerell, Fred M. 
Phelps, James Page, William P. Reid.C. Wesley Rob- 
erts, Edward B. Robinson, Adolph L. Schwartz, 
James Slauson, Raymond W. Stephens, Rufus P. 
Spalding, Frank G. Schumacher, Simpson H. Sinsa- 
baugh, Charles Sayler, Jr., Russell McD. Taylor, R. 
H. Travers, Louis Vetter, J. B. Van Nuys, Walter 
G. Van Pelt, Henry S. Van Dyke, Dr. Ralph Wil- 
liams, J. W. Wolters, Olin Wellborn, Jr., Alfred H. 
Wilcox, J. W. Wilkerson. 

Those invited included Messrs, and Mesdames, Car- 
roll Allen, E. R. Burk, Hancock Banning, R. P. Bishop 
William Bayly, Jr., J. F. Bumiller, F. W. Burnett, W. 
A. Barker, F. A. Bixby, L. M. Brunswig, Thomas P. 
Bishop of San Francisco, W. T. Bishop, M. J. Con- 
nell, Jeff Chandler, R. F. Carman, Leo. Chandler, A. 
L. Cheney, Volney Craig of Lamanda Park, Walter 
Chanslor, J. C. Drake, Fred Dorr, George Denis, F. 
W. Flint, Jr., W. M. Garland, Burton E. Green, E. H. 
Groenyke of Pasadena, Frank Griffith, HarryGrayof 
Pasadena, H. N. Gray of New York, Godfrey Holter- 
hoff, jr., Frank S. Hicks, Mortimer Henderson of 
Pasadena, Eugene Hewitt of San Francisco, Samuel 
Haskins, E. R. Kellam of Pasadena, R. B. King Walter 
R. Leeds, Lombard, E. Avery McCarthy, H. S. McKee 
of Monrovia, Randolph Fluntington Miner, John B. 
Miller, J. Kingsley Macomber, jr., E. J. Marshall, Will 
Nevin, Eugene Overton, Milo M. Potter, John Van G. 
Posey, Roy Pinkham, Louis P. Ramsay, Willoughby 
Rodman, R. A. Rowan, Alfred Solano, Fred Swain of 
Pasadena, Ross W. Smith, J. F. Sartori, John S. Tan- 
ner, I. N. Van Nuys, Philip Wilson, Nat Wilshire, B. 
Marshall' Wotkyns of Pasadena, General and Mrs. 
Adna R. Chaffee, Judge and Mrs. Charles Monroe, 
Doctors and Mesdames Earnest A. Bryant, Walter Jar- 
vis Barlow, Guy Cochran, Edward Dillon, Granville 
MacGowan ; Mesdames William C. Bennet, M. A. 
Briggs, Albert J. Howard, Virginia C. Keely of Peoria, 
111., Law, M. W. Longstreet, H. L. Macneii, J. J. Mey- 
ler, George Patton of San Gabriel, Marie Reed, Charles 
Wellington Rand, John I. Sabin of San Francisco, M. 
A. Wilcox. 

Misses Echo Allen, Lois Allen, Anna Andrews, 
Auten of Pasadena, Bishop, Bulkley, Brodtbeck, 
Brunswick, Louise Burk, Mary Burnham of Oarnge, 
Conroy,' Katherine Clark, Inez Clark, Mary Clark, 
Helen Chaffee, Charline Coulter, Marion Churchill, 
Denis Dulin, Helen Emery, Foy, Cora Foy, Fore, of 
Oakland, Holterhoff, Nina Jones, Lina Johnson, Ray 
Johnson, Virginia Johnson, Gertrude King, Irene 
Kelley, Lleyellyn, Lindley, Marion McGilvray of Pasa- 
dena, Murietta, Macomber, Melius, Katherine Melius, 
Newton Newlin, Patton of San Gabriel, Price, Kath- 
erine Ridgeway, May Ridgeway, Fannie Rowan, 




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Pacific Outlook 



21 



Grace Rowley, Maybelle Kendall. Severance, Margaret 
Severance, Irene Sabin of San Francisco, Ethel Shaw. 
Sallie Utley, Van Nuys, Kate Van Nuys, Wells, Wol- 
ters, Walbridge; Messrs. Archer Barnard, Neal Brown, 
John Cooper, A. I. Copp, jr., Erwin Chapin, fohn A. 
CoUiver, M. D., D. W. Childs, A. W. Ellington, Cbnde 
Tones, A. F. Kales of San Francisco, L. R. McFee, V. 
H. MacFarland, John Milner, Sayre MacNeil, Roy 
Naftzger, Charles ( \. Norris of San Francisco, I. B. 
Newton, Stuart O'Melveny, George S. Pickrell, J. M. 
Rodebaugh, M. D., of Pasadena, Thomas Rife of San 
Diego, Manuel Solano, Herbert White. Percy Wicks. 



Stanford Co-eds gathered Saturday at the Wom- 
an's Clubhouse on South Figueroa street for the 
annual luncheon given by the Stanford Woman's 
Club. The college pennants and the floral decora- 
tions were in the Stanford colors, cardinal and 
green. College memories were revived in the toasts 
given, the first letters of which spelled the word 
Stanford, including "Songs," "Traditions," "Athlet- 
ics." "New Year Greeting." "Freshmen." "Our- 
selves," "Roble." and "New Directors." Those who 
spoke were Miss Helen North, president; Miss Lou 
Ward, secretary, and the Misses Edith Jordan, Lucy 
Howard, Susan Carpenter, Edna Weh and Rose 
Smith. 

Mrs. Guy Cochran. 234 Loma Drive, was the host- 
ess last Monday afternoon at a tea given in honor 
of Mrs. John I. Sabin and her daughter, Miss Irene 
Sabin, of San Francisco, which was attended by 
over one hundred ladies. Mrs. Cochran was assist- 
ed by Mrs. Carey Marble. Mrs. Philip Johnson, Mrs. 
Adna R. Chaffee, Mrs. William R. Kelly, Mrs. J. 
Ross Clark, Mrs. Laura Leming, Mrs. Henry Al- 
bers, Mrs. E. D. Miller, Mrs. Harding, Mrs. I. N. 
Van Nuys, Mrs. E. P. Clark, Mrs. Michael J. Con- 
nell, Miss Walsh, Mrs. William May Garland, Mrs. 
Milo M. Potter, Miss Nina Jones, Miss Eva Keat- 
ing, Miss Annis Van Nuys, Miss Lucy Clark, Miss 
Mary Clark and Miss Marble. 

Rt. Rev. Bishop Thomas J. Conaty, Rev. Francis 
J. Conaty, and other members of the Catholic clergy 
were guests of the Ladies' Catholic Benevolent As- 
sociation on the occasion of the organization of a 
local branch Saturday evening, January 4, at the 
Woman's Clubhouse. As the name indicated, the 
object of the association will be the carrying on of 
charitable work. 

The Sigma Alpha Epsilon Alumni Association of 
Los Angeles held its regular New Year's dinner last 
Saturday night at Levy's and elected the following 
officers : Dr. George H. Kress, president ; Thomas 
Woolwine, first vice president ; William Bayly, second 
vice president ; Arthur W. Eckman, secretary and 
treasurer; Will Edd Andrews, correspondent. 

Dr. and Mrs. John C. McCoy of Barnard Park 
have issued invitations for a reception to be given 
in honor of their son's bride, Mrs. William Milton 
McCoy, Thursday evening, January 16. The latter 
is a charming young lady who has been the recip- 
ient of many social attentions lately. Among these 
was a luncheon given Jan. 3 by Mrs. Frank E. 
Walsh, of No. 403 South Alvarado street. 

The wedding of Miss Cornelia Caldwell, daughter 
of Judge and Mrs. H. C. Caldwell. 511 South Coro- 
nado street, and Guv Culver Smith, son of Mrs. R. 
P. Smith, 1503 Wilton Place, took place Wednes- 
day. January 8. 



.Miss Gwendolyn Laughlin and her guest. Miss 
Nancy Mcintosh, of London, are members of a 
motoring partj that will take in Riverside and Red- 
lands and other interesting places in that vicinity. 

Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Macready, 614 Carondelet 
street, announce the engagement of their niece. Miss 
Man. hi Uma Beckett, to Thomas Hart Talbot, the 
wedding to take place soon after Easter. 

Mrs. C. Leonardt of Chester Place, will give a 
card party. January 16, in honor of her daughter. 
Miss Ann Leonardt, whose engagement to Frank 
H. P'owell was recently announced. 

Miss Mabel Crossman, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
L. C. Crossman. 3501 Glen Albyn Drive, and Ralph 
L. Mossin, were married Saturday evening at the 
bride's home. 

* * * 
AMONG THE WOMEN'S CLUBS 

Friday Morning Club 
Friday Morning Club members and their invited 
guests listened to an interesting talk at their last meet- 
ing, given by Marshall Taylor, late of Indiana, whose 
subject was "Tea-planting in Assam and Melbourne," 
illustrated by stereopticon views. Fourteen years of 
plantation life have given Mr. Taylor rare experiences 
and their recounting proved very entertaining to the 
audience. Preparations are being made for the fitting 
celebration of the birthday of Madame Caroline M. 
Severance which will be marked with a reception to the 
honored founder of the Friday Morning Club, at the 
Woman's Clubhouse Tuesday afternoon, Jan. 14. 



Press Club 

Ella Wheeler Wilcox and Mrs. Carter H. Harrison 
will be the guests of honor at the regular monthly 
luncheon of the Women's Press Club of Southern Cali- 
fornia at the Westminster Hotel Monday. Madame 
Severance, who is an honorary member, will be a 
guest on that day, if her health permits. It is likely 
there will be other noted women writers present, as 
there are several in Southern California who are 
friends of members and there is no doubt the gathering 
will be a brilliant one. 



Ebell Club 

The meeting of the Ebell this week was for members 
only. The semi-annual business reports were read and 
passed on, after which a reception by the board to 
club members was held. Music was furnished by 
Mrs. Marion Welsh and Mrs. F. B. Silverwood, who 
sang. 

■ Next week's programme will be a lecture bv Miss 
Josephine C. Locke, who will talk on "Architecture 
an Expression of Race Consciousness." Miss Locke 
is well known in Chicago and the Middle West as 
an ardent exponent of public education in art. She 
has gained much in years of study in Europe, 
Greece and Palestine, where her quest was the 
seeking of the meaning beneath the form. 



Ruskin Art 

As one phase of the subject "Wood-carving." which 
the Ruskin Art Club is studying this year. "Etch- 
ing." "Dry-point." and "Aquapoint." were discussed 
at the Wednesday meeting this week. Miss Beatrice 
Fox had charge of the programme. 

Xext week "Rembrandt and His Desciples," will be 
the subject, which will be studied under the leadership 
of Mrs. F. B. McLcnegan and Mrs. L. J. McOuade. 



Pacific Outlook 



We Are Fortunate 

Los Angeles may well congratulate itself, despite 
some faults in its own street railways, when it reads 
what Burton J. Hendrick says of the New York sys- 
tem in the current number of McClure's. His 
words, in part, are as follows : 

Probably no street railway capitalists ever had 
so rich an opportunity for legitimate profit. The 
income from nickel fares amounts to $37,000,000 a 
year. In spite of this, the whole Metropolitan sys- 
tem is in a condition of deplorable decay. The 
story of the road, and the enormous fortunes which 
have been made by its exploitation, is clearly writ- 
ten in its physical dilapidation. Crazy vehicles, 
with machinery so out of joint that its rattling can 
be heard blocks away, are running upon the most 
pretentious thoroughfares. Their filthy condition 
renders them a constant menace to the public health. 
The quality of the employes, according to a state- 
ment recently made by Oren Root, the Metro- 
politan's general manager, is constantly deteriorat- 
ing; the men are so poorly paid that only those des- 
perately in need of work join the Metropolitan 
force. 

The surface cars are not provided with the most 
ordinary safety-devices. New York is the only 
large city in the country where the old-fashioned 
hand-brake is still in use. The Third avenue road, 
before the Metropolitan acquired it, used power 
br,akes on all its cars ; the first act of the Metropoli- 
tan, when it assumed control, was to remove these 
safety appliances, and the explanation usually ac- 
cepted is that the management feared that the suc- 
cessful use of power brakes on one railroad would 
cause the public to demand that the reform be ex- 
tended to all its lines. This failure to use proper 
safety appliances and the inexperience of the em- 
ployes makes the casuality list a heavy one.. An in- 
vestigation recently made showed that in 27 days 
there had been 5,500 accidents on the street rail- 
ways of New York City ; 42 people w r ere killed out- 
right, 10 skulls were fractured, .10 limbs amputated, 
440 limbs broken, while 83 other passengers were 
seriously injured. In proportion to the traffic, the 
New York street railways killed eight times as 
many people as those in Liverpool. Their record is 
surpassed only by the Widener-Elkins roads in 
Philadelphia, which killed 801 passengers last year. 

* * * 

He Was a Navigator 

Sir Charles Wyndham, during his American tour, 
said at a dinner in New York : 

"Too many of us resemble the boy at the wheel. 

"This boy stood on the bridge of a schooner Dc- 
side the captain on a starry night. It suddenly be- 
came necessary for the captain to go below, and he 
said to the boy : 

" 'Here, take the wheel. I'll be back in a few 
minutes. Steer by that star and you will be all 
right." 

"The boy began to steer the boat, and soon he 
got her out of her course. The star now appeared 
astern instead of ahead. He shouted down to the 
captain : 

" 'Hi, skipper, come up and find us another star. 
I've passed that one.' " 

* * * 

Little Tommy Whacken was taken by his mother 
to choose a pair of knickerbockers, and his choice 
fell on a pair to which a card was attached, stating, 
"These can't be beaten." — Sacred Heart Review. 








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Pacific Outlook 
UNDER THE SKYLIGHTS 



23 



By Perez Field 
Tuesday Carl ( (scar Borg opened an exhibition of lii- 
pictures at the Woman's Club house. This oppor 
tun it) t" show the public some of his latest work 

came upon him rather suddenly. SO that he has been 
fed to finish a number of canvases at short no- 
tice. All of them were planned, of course, and 
many of them were partly blocked in. but the final 
touches were made quickly. There was no time for 
deliberation — the over study of effects. This was 
an davantage. * m this account we gain a real in- 
sight into the temperament of this painter, who 
made his start here in Los Angeles, and where 
also he met with a success both creditable to himself 
anil pleasing to his friends. 

Some of the characteristics of his works are interest- 
ing. They seem to promise that fresh and individual- 
ised kind of expression which one longs to see. It is 
sensibility which distinguishes art from nature. Mr. 
Borg is preeminently a man of feeling. The best of 
his work has an almost eery quality. Fortunately he 
is as yet without a formula. His ready facility with the 
brush has not up to the present time trapped him into 
doing the purely commonplace, a snare we devoutly 
hope he may escape. The final limits to his spontaneity 
are not yet set. He is still seeking and therefore still 
free. This gives his pictures a sense of freedom which 
is gratifying. His fancy wanders in a wonderland of 
sombre and elusive hues. Nature is to him a sugges- 
tion rather than a domineering mistress, who has said 
the last word in. color and form. He tries to catch 
something under the fine panoply of leaf and crusty 
earth which escapes us all. In order to seize this 
subtle thing he uses deep tones, points of color that 
stimulate the imagination. 

In his newer mood he has a rare feeling for trees. 
This is best shown in the picture called "At the Close 
of Day" wdierein one sees some oak trees above a deep 
blue sea. These gnarled monsters are full of a 
gnomet-like charm — druidic, shadow-full, hushed, 
and the sea is blue — not the merry blue of the 
Mediterranean . but a more penetrating color, 
thoughtful rather than gay. 

The prevailing note of his best pictures is a quiet 
one. The repose they express is thoughtful rather than 
dreamy. With the glare of day this artist is less suc- 
cessful. It is not that his work is either mournful or 
furtive. The charm of it lies in the feeling of friend- 
ly isolation which it gives. His gloomy places are 
kindly peopled — with fanciful folk perhaps, but 
nevertheless peopled. His seas do not sustain any 
boisterous crews, nor any at all sad. On the bosom 
of his seas one would not lightly embark on a care- 
less cruise of love, though they might invite a 
stauncher equipment, chary a little of the unknown 
gods. 

The trees in "When Day and Night Meet" are 
bathed in a peculiar twilight hue, quiet and pensive. 
The full and luxuriant tops seem to waive in a mystic 
light, reluctant to choose between the battling tints of 
a departing sun and the coming moon "On a Lonely 
Shore" is a good study of an eucalyptus, faithful in 
drawing and character. This closer adherance to the 
outline of familiar forms in nature is, perhaps, one of 
the limitations Mr. Borg may in due time find it profit- 
able to consider. "A Breeze from the Sea" is another 
canvas, having a careful study of a blue gum. In 
both of these there is a wholesome sweep of wind. The 



four above mentioned pictures arc the most important 

lis oil paintings, the others being of various sizes 
and merit. 

The artist's dexterit) is shown further in some pen- 
cil sketches, ink draw ings and monotypes. I >f tin 

there are three which deserve mention. They are "The 
Viking Fleet," a large drawing for a monotype, full 
of movement ami fantasy; "The Forest Road," a col- 
ored monotype, very successful and breathing the old- 
world and old-time spirit of the woods; ami "El Cam- 
ino Real," in brown, unusually strong for work of 
this kind, (hie feels in these somehow that Mr, Borg 
is not quite contemporary. He is to reminiscent; Or 
is he prescient? Let us hope so. 

The Woman's Club is an attractive place in which to 
show pictures, in spite of the fact that the light is not 
very g'ood in all cases. It has not the forlorn and deso- 
late air of the public gallery. The corning and going 
of women, loound on other intents besides the deter- 
mined one of picture gazing, gives a happy and human 
touch to this exhibition wdtich is, in some measure, im- 
parted to the pictures. To show the pictures here is a 
courtesy to thes artist. The profit of this experiment to 
the artist and the pleasure it will unqusetionably give 
the members we trust may render this invasion of club 
land a permanent conquest. The pictures are to remain 



1 jHk 4 \ 

I 1 J*j-- 1 

IP i'j P J 


ito'l S SIMM » . •■'•'..■ P 







Mrs. Wendt's Stcdio and Some of Her Work 

at the club a week longer. A few already have been 
sold. 

The secrets of nature are not for those who run to 
read. They must be sought by intuition. We all of us 
feel that there is something more in a mysterious 
shadow than a touch of cobalt. It seems as if the forest 
shades of grays and green imprisoned or made more 
palpable an impish or intangible consciousness, possibly 
imminent in things. Thus vaguely guessing like other 
men, Mr. Borg is apparently trying deftly to catch this 
fleeting impression of that which ismute, playful, and 
almost weird, about our trees. He is successful so far 
that the memory of his picture remains in mind, as of 
a gossamer veil, shifted a bit to our human eyes, re- 
vealing a half guessed secret of Dame Nature, moth- 
erlv and kindly, but still knowing a prank or two. 
This artist has a virile sensibility which may take 
him far. He hopes to be able to study in Paris for 
a time. Let us trust that he may do so. and that he 
may come back to us fortified and enobled in his art. 



Mrs. Julia Bracken Wendt has established her- 
self for the winter at the North Sichel street studio. 
where she and her husband achieve so much good 
work. Mrs. Wendt is also the happy possessor of 
a studio in Chicago wdiere she keeps most of her 



24 



Pacific Outlook 



casts. A photograph of it is shown in this issue. 
In the center of the picture is seen a mortuary urn 
for Mrs. Sterges, an excellent composition, both 
dignified and sympathetic. On the mantel is a 
bust of Mrs. Patrick Campbell, who is expected in 
this city with her company this winter. On the 
other side of the studio is a cast of the statue of 
Monroe which Mrs. Wendt did for the St. Louis 
Exposition. The model of a triumphal arch in the 
middle of the room is a suggestion for a public 
monument in Chicago. It is decorated with figures 
representing the industries of the land, while a 
symbolic figure of Art puts in place the keystone 
of the structure, a very charming conception, in- 
dicating the inventive genius as well as the techni- 
cal skill of the artist. 



Art Briefs 

The last of Stanford White's art collection of 
marbles was sold recently in New York for $8,416, 
making a total of $92,028.50 which his estate has 
received for his artistic treasures. W. R. Hearst 
and Mrs. Pulitzer were among the purchasers. 

A "Holy Family'' by Reynolds has just been res- 
cued from' the cellars of the National Gallery, Lon- 
don, where it had lain for thirty years. It has been 
restored to good condition. 

The following exhibitions have been arranged for 
at Steckel's gallery on Broadway: February 1, J. 
Jackson; February 16, J. E. McBurney and Miss 
M. Patterson; March 1, Mrs. Wachtel; March 15, 
Mrs. N. V. Sullivan of San Diego. 

Rob Wagner has been visiting friends in Pasa- 
dena lately. On Dec. 17 he published in a Santa 
Barbara paper an excellent article, making an ap- 
peal for civic beauty. Among other things he 
says: "Telegraph poles may be a hideous necessity, 
but there is really no occasion to paint them with 
such aggressive vulgarity. Green paint costs no 
more than white or red and helps to lose the ugly 
perpendicular lines in the trees." 

An exhibition of paintings by Joseph Johnson 
Ray will open at the Blanchard Hall on Wednesday 
next, and may be seen until the end of the month. 

Joseph Greenbaum has recently begun work on 
a large ten-foot panel for the living room of Mrs. 
Ingraham of West Adams street. It shows a 
stretch of woodland bright with- sunset hues and a 
glimpse of the hills as seen from Mrs. Ingraham's 
home . Decorative work of this sort when well 
done is very attractive. The mention of decorative 
panels for home use is apt to raise a derisive smile 
among the knowing ones, chiefly because so much 
of that kind of work is done by impulsive and vain 
amateurs; sweet young girls often, who can neither 
cook properly nor sew at all, but who think they can 
paint. This is a great pity, for nothing can better 
embelish a room than suitable paintings made ex- 
pressly for certain spots, and executed by compe- 
tent artists. We trust that Mr. Greenbaum's un- 
doubtd success with this commission may provoke 
other women to follow Mrs. Ingraham's excellent 
. example. 

Eugene C. Frank will take about twenty-four of 
his pictures to San Diego for exhibition in the Pub- 
lic Library under the auspices of the San Diego Art 
Association. He leaves here for the south before 
the middle of the month. 



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25 




A Touch of Ibsen 

The ghost ni" "Ghosts" haunts Mrs. Andrews' 
play, "Kate Shannon", and dominates the powerful 
climax of the third act. It is a precarious under- 
taking to write in the shadow of a great master; 
but perhaps the very fact that the product of the 
worker in the shadow is noticeable for its own 
strength despite the fact that its basic idea has 
been delineated before with acknowledged success, 
is proof that it is in itself an accomplishment, and 
if not an original one. at least one which stands the 
test of comparison and still retains its identity. Af- 
ter all. every style already had its recognized mas- 
ter long ago. and everything that is written about 
the human emotions today must be kin to some- 
thing that has been written before. Wherever the 
constant struggle of sex against the restrictions of 
society is pictured in concrete form, the result 
must be generally the same. The difference be- 
tween success and failure in the attempt to teach 
a worthy lesson is the skill with which the material 
is assembled, the genuineness of the motive which 
prompts the attempt, and the delicacy of sentiment 
with which the great fundamental truths, so dif- 
ficult of proper presentation, are laid bare to a 
promiscuous audience, the bulk of which is often 
undiscerning and given to brutal misconcentions. 

The story of "Kate Shannon'' takes its rise from 
that familiar spring of social tribulation which in 
a man is called "an indiscretion", and in a woman, 
sin. It is hardly fair to a play of this nature to 
enter into an analytical discussion of it with the 
usual "outline" of the plot. A mere sketch of its 
plan is bound to convey an unpleasant impjession. 
The person honestly interested in the right or 
wrong of such a play must study for himself the 
manner in which it is worked out on the stage. 

As to the 'new play from a purely technical 
standpoint, there are some things most obvious, 
both for and against it. The movement of the first 
and second acts is rather slow, with awkward gaps 
in the dialogue, which, it seems, might be easily 
remedied. The conclusion of each of these acts is 
strong, however; and the climax in the third act is 
undeniably powerful. This is where the plot is 
most obviously Isbenesque, but Mrs. Andrews de- 
livers her blow here in a more telling manner, per- 
haps, than does her master in that climax of which 
this one is remindful, by providing the tragic mo- 
ment with a foil of humor; although much of the 
fine point of this contrasting stab seems — or at 
least it so seemed at the first production — to be 
lost on the audience. The final act. while its con- 
clusion is impressive, is clumsily constructed. A 
note to the programme announces that "the lights 
will be turned out for two minutes during the 
fourth act; during the interval two hours are sup- 
posed to have clasped." This expedience serves 
for the unseen introduction of the suffering 



and spirit-hurt girl, Dorothy, the unfortunate sweet- 
heart of Tom. Kale Shannon's idolized son, to the 
lounge, where the return of light shows her lying, 
feverish and tossing. The whole progress of the 
act is thrown into confusion by this device for those 
in the audience who are unfamiliar with the text, 
and it is difficult for the majority of the auditors 
at first to find any excuse for Dorothy's presence 
in the peculiar condition in which she is shown. 

"Kate Shannon", written by Mrs. Gertrude Nel- 
son Andrews of this city, was produced Monday 
night at the Auditorium for the first time on any 
stage and continued through the week. A hand- 
some audience, full of enthusiasm for the authoress 
and the players, greeted the first-night effort. 

The play has received splendid treatment at the 
hands of the Ferris management. The stage set- 
tings, all especially prepared for this production, 
are beautiful, and the details of gowning and fur- 
nishings are delightfully accomplished. The set-7 
ting' of the finale, with the view from the balcony 
of the Shannon home down onto the Hudson and 
the dawn of the new clay over the water, is very 
striking. Mrs. Andrews received an ovation at 
the conclusion of the third act and retired laden 
with lloral tributes. 

.Miss Stone makes a strong appeal in the part of 
the thorough, even if misguided, woman, Kate 
Shannon. She is entirely in sympathy with the 
meaning of the character, and her emotional tem- 
perament, so intensely human, joined with admir- 
able repression and a beauty which is particularly 
emphasized in this sympathetic role, combine to 
draw from the part the best and truest that the 
authoress has put into it. In the climax in the third 
act she drives straight to the heart; and later in a 
brief moment that comes along toward the last of 
the long heart-struggle when, prostrate on the 
couch in the studio sobbing over the newly dis- 
closed waywardness of her boy, identical with 
that of his father before him, she catches the words 
from the man whose love she long ago had 
ceased to hope for again and whom she had 
made herself and all who knew her believe 
she hated. "I love her." spoken in all reverence from 
a redeemed and chastened spirit to another man 
who fain would have barred him from her presence, 
and her sobbing suddenly is stifled by a deep-drawn 
breath, and she raises her face to the light with an 
eagerness like the awful eagerness of the thirst- 
stricken at the limpid sound of living water, the 
while an expression of exquisite happiness dis- 
closes without warning the love indestructible 
which she had so persistently mutilated in her heart 
of hearts that she had learned to call it hate — in 
such a moment is discovered the true art in Miss 
Stone. Would that her abilities were not so often 
abused. 

Joseph Kilgour in the role of Thomas Atwood, 



26 



Pacific Outlook 



the prominent New York lawyer who, in his youth 
in the West, won Kate's all and forfeited it in a 
cowardly moment, rises to the requirements of the 
latter part of the play, but in the opening scenes 
his mannerisms are more than usually prominent 
and give a stiffness to his interpretation. 

As Richard Harding, a Western senator who has 
loved Kate since childhood, Frank Beamish makes 
a good impression at first, but in the more intense 
scenes he uses his voice too loudly to be effective. 
Harry Cashman makes his reappearance with the 
company in the role of Pat Brady, Kate's gambler 
father. 

John L. Phipps is badly cast as Tom Shannon, 
Kate's son. He does not treat the part with any 
sympathy and his facial make-up is unfortunate. 
This weakens some of the best situations. 

Of this whole company Florence Barker is sec- 
ond, at present, only to Miss Stone in dramatic 
power. To what her achievements may reach in 
maturer years can only be speculated on now, but 
her possibilities seem great. In the current pro- 
duction she plays Dorothy Bassett, the pretty 
stenographer, with good effect. Eleanor Montell 
has a colorless part in the role of .Fay Brockton, 
an artist-friend of Kate's. Carrie Clarke Ward is 
amusing in the character part of Mrs. Lizzie Gans T 
by, Kate's aunt. 

The humanity and strong purpose of Mrs. An- 
drews's work is felt all through "Kate Shannon" 
and it is to be hoped that the play will not suffer 
On account of the too obvious source of its in- 
spiration, even though it surpasses the source in 
delicacy and ideals. 



It is easy to believe that nothing more de- 
lightful than "The Three of Us" with Miss Kath- 
erine Emmet as the principal ever was presented 
on the stock stage of Los Angeles. Indeed, the 
current production of this play at the Belasco is 
so decidedly superior to what usually is brought us 
"over the road" that we are made to feel glad that 
we are to have further opportunities to enjoy the 
■charming Miss Emmet in other roles of a similar 
sort to that of Rhy MacChesney, for surely the 
appeal she has made in her consumately artistic ex- 
pression of sweet womanliness through this charac- 
ter will not be overlooked in planning for future 
productions. 

In the first place, Rachel Crother's play, "The 
Three of Us", which is new to this coast, is de- 
lightful in itself. It is one of those rare productions 
in which the whole movement, from first to last, is 
perfectly natural. The lives which it depicts live 
their various ways through the four acts as convinc- 
ingly, and are swept on toward their inevitable 
destinies as surely, as are the real lives which Fate 
is ever driving forward all around us — while it 
drives us, too, though each one thinks himself the 
only mere spectator. So without effort are the 
simple lives of the Three of Them and their fellows 
in the little Nevada mining camp developed before 
your eyes that soon you have no doubt at all of the 
complete identity of these dear folk. 

At no point has the builder of the gentle desert 
drama strained the framework to carry out the 
story; the plot is as simple and unaffected as are 
the plots of Fate in real life; nowhere is stage 
claptrap resorted to to carry a point, though the 



The AUDITORIUM SPARt ii M B J^h^' s ' 1 

"Theatre Beautiful" 

Week of January 13. Matinees Wednesday 
and Saturday 

The One Distinct Dramatic Novelty 

FLORENCE STONE 

and 

The FERRIS STOCK COMPANY 

In an Indian Idyl 

THE REDSKIN 

Prices: 10, 25, 35 and 50 cents. Matinees: 10 and 25 cents 

Phones: F 2367, Main 5180 

Next, Week— THE HOLY CITY— At, Last,! 



SIMPSON'S AUDITORIUM 

Thursday Evening, January 16th 

First Appearance in Los Angeles 
of 

Adela Verne 

'Uhe 3XCusical Sensation of the Season 

Tickets $2.00, $1.50, $1,00, 75c and 50c. 
Students' Rates 
AT BARTLETT'S MUSIC STORE 




All the best 

I NSTR U IVI E NTS 

For Band or Orchestra 

The only Collection of Fine Old Violins in the West 

Easy payments if desired 

3fit3Qeralb'8 

113 South Spring Street 



Have Yoti 

Attended our Great Holiday Factory Sale or Pianos 

Free Music Scholarship 

Discounts from our Factory Prices 
Sale Closes December 14 

D. H. BALDWIN ®> CO. 



The Auditorium 



431 W. Fifth St,. 



Pacific Outlook 



27 



studied art of the dramatist in so assembling frag- 
ments of actual life on the stage ;i> to present a 
perfectly patterned life mosaic, is in evidence below 
the smooth, apparently unstudied surface. 

"The Three of Us" is a fine, wholesome play, and 
its sweet, honest role of Rhy MacChesney affords 
Mi-s Emmet the opportunity to prove what we 
already had been lead to believe was in her. The 
character of Rhy, the frank, cheerful, loving and 
loved elder sister, left by the death of mother and 
father to care unaided for two younger brothers on 
a mere pittance — unaided save for dear old Irish 
Maggie, who was a servant in the family before the 
days of misfortune and has remained faithful to 
the pitiful little Three — is a portrayal of the kind 
of a woman whom it is redemption for a doubting' 
man to know — the ideal woman of a man's finest 
hope, infinitely gentle, but strong;; frank, trusting, 
unsuspecting, deeply affectionate, yet with an 
honor armored beyond assail by instinctive purity; 
a countenance always upturned and aglow with 
faith and unselfishness. An ideal girl-woman, 
indeed, is this Rhy, but in no wise idealized, for • 
despite much unbelief, such girls, though somewhat 
rare these days, do exist. 

No, Rhy is not an idealized girl, but an intensely 
human one: and Miss Emmet lives her out before 
your eyes with such an intelligent regard for just 
the straight, unspoiled woman in her that you go 
away cleaner, more hopeful. This is the kind of a 
man's woman Miss Emmet presents — the impulse 
of every honest-minded man in the audience is to 
unbutton his cuffs and pull at his coat when any 
man on the stage says a rude word to her. 

She portrays every phase of a true, wholesome 
girl's emotions, both in the working out of the 
unselfish love of those of her own blood left de- 
pendent upon her, and in the stranger, more per- 
plexing love for a lover, with a distinctness which 
shows her possessed of an accomplished mentality. 
She develops the best there is in her lines — their 
delicacy and ultra-meaning. In the scene in the 
third act where, discovered by the man she loves 
in the house of the latter's rich rival, where she has 
gone in the honesty of her nature without a thought 
of wrong to request release from a silly promise 
the keeping of which is involivng her name and the 
interests of Steve Townley, she defends her honor 
against the aspersions of the two men, one honest- 
ly distrustful of her intentions, the other covertlv 
encouraging this distrust in his rival, Miss Emmet 
rises to emotional triumph in her passionate, yet 
never theatrical, denunciation. And in the scene 
with the wayward youngster of a brother whose 
selfishness has brought all Rhy's troubles upon her, 
she is victorious in a way which differs mightly 
from the rugged triumph — the delicate victory of a 
sister's sweet wiles over the stubborn, even brutal 
determination of the big "smarty" of a kid brother 
to go wrong. This scene is an exquisite bit of a 
heart-story in miniature. 

And in this connection the fidelity to life of the 
work of Charles Ruggles in this role of Clem, the 
boorish youngster, must be accorded no small 
amount of praise. His interpretation is good 
throughout. The small part of Sonnie. the little 
rough-and-tumble boy brother, done by Master 
Peter Clancy, is a cunning bit. 

Lewis Stone is seen in the character of Stephen 
Townley, Rhy's real lover. While this is not a 



strong part, it is a very human one. and Mr. Stone 
makes a g 1 impression in it. Harry Glaziei 

as Louis Beresford, the unsuccessful suitor. 

The brief appearance in one act of Hop Sing, im- 
personated by John Daly Murphy, affords a de- 
lightfully funny moment. Eleanor Carey as Maggie, 

the faithful servant, is quite successful. The resl 

of the cast play their minor parts well. The scenes 

are most attractively staged. 



A successful production of "The Toy maker" by 
the San Francisco Opera Company opened the week 
at the Los Angeles Theater and still is drawing 
good crowds to hear and witness its not over- 
musical but mightily funny "goings on". On ac- 
count of the wide acquaintance, as well -as of the 
ability, of many members of the aggregation with 
former San Francisco people now here the company 
is a strong drawing card, and the entire house was 
sold out the opening night. 

This "comic opera" is light and frolicsome, with 
few really musical passages but with an abundance 
of queer situations which the principals make the 
most of. 

Arthur Cunningham in the part of the abbot 
sings in fine voice. George Kunkel as Gugenheimer, 
the toymaker of Nuremburg, is the out-and-out 
funny man of the week's cast; but the best thing 
of the whole performance is Daphne Pollard in her 
impersonation of the mechanical doll. Eugene 
Weiner, the tenor, is cast as the renegade monk. 

The costuming of the opera is effective and the 
production as a whole leaves a most pleasant im- 
pression of pretty girls and gaiety. The company 
promises to attract a large patronage during its stay 
at the Los Angeles. 

L. B. 



A Parisian Novelty 

One of the most unique places of amusement to 
be seen abroad is "The Apollo" on the Avenue 
Clichy in Paris. This is the famous "reversible" 
theater which, though it still is comparatively new, 
already is celebrated as one of the sights of after- 
dark Paris. 

Briefly, "The Apollo" is a combined vaudeville 
theater, cafe and- dance hall, the main floor of the 
specious auditorium being converted into a ball 
room every night at 10:30 simply by "touching a 
button" and turning the floor upside-down. The 
whole structure is of steel, and it is said to be very 
clever electrical machinery which the inventor has 
evolved for this queer task. 

The impression of the average American is that 
amusements are cheap in Paris, but this is not true, 
at least during the summer tourist season. It costs 
three francs, or about sixty cents, to enter "The 
Apollo", for instance, and this fee does not give you 
any kind of a theater seat. It merely admits you to 
the foyer cafe, where you may sit at one of the 
small tables and order a drink. The cheapest order 
possible is fifty centimes for a very diminuitive 
glass of beer and the waiter is constantly hovering 
over you to snatch it up the moment it is emptied, 
thus constantly placing you under obligation to or- 
der again, each order requiring a fresh tip. From 
here vou have a view of the stage over the heads 
of the audience proper. Seats in the auditorium 
cost from three francs up to ten. 

In a corner of this after part of the theater there 



28 



Pacific Outlook 



is one of those funny French versions of an "Ameri- 
can bar" with high stools, such as the old fashioned 
bookkeeper used, lined up before it. Perched on 
these are to be seen "ladies" dressed in the ex- 
tremest style of the season and sipping colored 
drinks with the supercilious French dandies. 

In the space between the foyer tables and the 
railing which surrounds the rear tier of theater seats 
gorgeously appareled women, many of them beau- 
tiful, promenade, some in groups by themselves, 
others in the company of gilded youths or cynical 
old rues in full evening dress. As the regular per- 



workmen below can be heard shooting heavy bolts 
into place, and at the signal from the engine room 
to the guards above that all is safe there is a great 
rush by the audience to the floor and to the tables 
and chairs. Here your little glass of beer will cost 
you a full franc, or twentv cents. 

•Dancing is begun immediately, and sometimes it 
develops into a pretty lively sort as the night grows 
later. The floor is cleared at intervals for perform- 
ances by professional dancers. The nature of these 
"extras" is thoroughly Parisian. 

So great has become the annual influx of English 




Adela Verne-, Celebrated English Pianist 



formance ceases the theater audience disperses to 
the foyer or the galleries and the loungers and 
promenaders crowd to the railing to see the floor 
turn its summersault. 

The movement is very slow, the rear portion fall- 
ing and the other side rising. Gradually the gap 
grows deeper until the crowd gazes straight down 
into the great cement pit provided for the evolution 
of the floor. For a moment the floor stands straight 
on end, the rows upon rows of seats presenting a 
dizzy appearance in their backward position ; then 
the gap slowly begins to close again until a polished 
dance floor with little tables and chairs screwed 
into place around its margin, slips into place. The 



spea"king tourists to Paris that at these more mod- 
ern places of amusement one may hear, during the 
season, about as much English spoken on the stage 
as French. In fact the writer witnessed a per- 
formance at "The Apollo" when two thirds of the 
performers were American and English vaudeville 
specialists and Southern coon songs were one of the 
hits of the evening. 

Doubtless we shall hear of one of these novelties 
in New York before long. Indeed, such a startling 
yet simple innovation sounds so thoroughly Ameri- 
can that it would be easy to believe (what some al- 
ready say) that it was from an American that the 
idea was bought. 



Pacific Outlook 



29 



Theater Notes 

A distinct novelty is to be presented next week 
at tlic Auditorium by the Ferris company. It will 
be "The Redskin", a drama of aboriginal life b< 
the advent of the white man. with every character 
an Indian. It is said to be very poetical in theme 
and it never has been presented outside of New 
York. Ferris engaged Antonio Apache, the full- 
blooded Indian of high education who is in charge 
of the Indian Crafts exhibit near Eastlake Park, 
the advise in the costuming and in the details of 
Indian life. How the well known members of the 
Ferris company, most of whom are largely given 
to appearing in conventional evening clothes, will 
adapt themselves to the simple life of the naked- 
limbed aborigine, remains an interesting question. 
Will Mr. Kilgotir of Edinburgh and London be the 
Heap Big Chief? Here, indeed, will be a problem 
for art to overcome — the adjustment of that charm- 
ing British-Scotch accent to the poetical effusions 
of the pre-Columbian American. "The Holy City" 
is in preparation for the following week. 

Monday night Joseph Galbraith will make his 
reappearance with the Belasco company in the Nat 
C. Goodwin comedy success, "A Gilded Fool". He 
will have the role of Chauncey Short in which he 
will he supported by the entire company, with Miss 
Emmet as Margaret Ruthven. 

The San Francisco Opera Company will produce 
"Ship Ahoy" at the Los Angees next week. 

Frank Healy. manager and proprietor of the San 
Francisco Opera Company, was married in this city 
during the week to Miss Lynne Isaacs, daughter of 
Judge James Isaacs of Redding. They were enter- 
tained after the wedding by Charles W. York, man-" 
ager of the Los Angeles Theater, and Mrs. Yorke. 
They will make their home for the present at Hotel 
Hayward. 

Mrs. Patrick Campbell will make her appearance 
on this coast in a short time, playing four of her 
greatest successes. "The Notorious Mrs. Ebb- 
smith" will be one of them. 



Celebrated English Musician. 

Adela Verne, England's greatest pianist and one 
of the most widely appreciated pianists now before 
the public, will appear Jan. 17 at Simpson Auditor- 
ium under the management of L. E. Behymer. She 
appeared in eight concerts in San Francisco recent- 
ly and was there proclaimed by press and public 
one of the musical sensations of years. San Fran- 
cisco even claims to have "discovered" her, a claim 
which can hardly be taken seriously, as Adela Verne 
already is too well known in every part of Europe, 
Canada and Australia, where she has played with 
the greatest success and been received almost as 
a musical phenomenon. 

Peje Storck will give a reception in her honor 
Saturday at his studio, No. 922y 2 South Hope 
street, in order that local society and musical peo- 
ple may have an opportunity to meet this celebrated 
and attractive English woman. 



Kubelik's Growing Art 

Jan Kubelik, considered by many authorities the 
most marvelous living violinist, is making his third 
annual tour of America and will be heard at Simp- 
son Auditorium in this city in two programmes, 
Jan. 28 and 30. 

iAt the age of ten this virtuoso's work astonished' 



the world and he has continued to expand his art 
in every way. In technique it is said that he has 
never been equalled since the days of Paganinnini 
ami in beauty of tone and power and intelligence 
of interpretation he has developed until he stands 
today in the very foremost place among the great 
masters of "the instrument with a soul". Like 
Josef Hofman, the pianist, who will be here later, 
Kubelik has been before the public since a child, 
continually growing and improving in artistic abil- 
ity. Daniel Frohman, the theatrical manager, is 
personally directing his tour. Mile. Bertha Roy, 
French pianiste, will he the assisting artiste, and 
Herr Ludwig Schwab, who has been Kubelik's ac- 
companist for many years, will be heard in that 
capacity at. the concerts to be given here. 

Following Our Lead 

In a communication to the Argonaut from Lon- 
don a writer says, in a description of the farewell 
performance of Tetrazzini, a singer who was ac- 
claimed by the Pacific Coast before London or New 
York recognized her : 

Popular enthusiasm was by no means confined to 
the theater. There are, indeed, very few crowned 
heads who would not be gratified by such street 
demonstrations as have been given to Tetrazzini. 
Great crowds gathered outside the theater doors to 
cheer her, and when she threw bouquets of flowers 
among them their enthusiasm almost passed the 
bounds of decorum. Men tried to shake hands 
with her and women tried to kiss her, and more 
than once a hastily improvised body-guard of gen- 
tlemen has been necessary to protect her from an 
admiration that was manifested not wisely but too 
well. On one occasion Signor Tetrazzini was quite 
unable to enter the carriage in which his wife was 
to drive home. He simply could not penetrate the 
cheering crowd, and so perforce had to walk behind 
in the company of several hundred enthusiasts, 
who were determined to give just one more cheer 
outside the hotel. The signora says she has never 
seen such determination nor such cordiality on the 
part of the public. "They wait cheerfully outside 
the doors for many hours in the biting cold, and on 
one seems to complain. Not only this, but behind 
the scenes everybody has been so wonderfully good 
to me. Why, the scene-shifters, lime-light opera- 
tors, and even the soldiers who sometimes act as 
supers all applaud, and there is always o second 
ovation behind the curtain after the one in front 
is over." 

Third Philharmonic 

Herbert Witherspoon will sing at the third event 
of the Philharmonic Course, which will be held in 
Simpson Auditorium Tuesday evening. The pro- 
gramme will be as follows : 

PART I. 
Opera and Oratorio. 
Recit. I feel the Deity Within 

Aria: Arm! Arm! Ye Braves . . . G. F. Handel 
(From Judas Maccabaeus) 
Song to the Evening Star . . . R. Wagner 
(From Tannhauser) 

Non piu Andrai W. A. Mozart 

(.From "Le nozze di Fiaro'') 

PART II. 
Classical and Modern Songs in German 
(Der Doppelganger . . . . F. Schubert 
Wer Maehtedich so Krank Alte Laute 
Der Knabe mit dem Wunderhorn . . R. Schumann 
Im Spatboot Richard Strauss 



30 



Pacific Outlook 



Waldeinsamkeit Engen Haile 

Helle Nacht 

Drei Wandrer Hans Hermann 

PART III. 
Modern Songs in English 

Forever and a Day Albert Mack 

The Pauper's Drive Signey Homer 

Pastorale H. Lane Wilson 

Messmates Hermann Lohr 

PART IV. 
L'Oiseau S'envole (Paul et Virginie) . Victor Massie 

Si tu le veux Ch. Koechlin 

Modern French Songs 

La Paix (Monotone) Reynaldo Hahn 

'Chanson (From "La Jolie Fille de Perth") Georges Bizet 

PART V. 
Old Melodies 
Meet Me 'By Moonlight Alone (English) 

Arranged by Wade 

Shall I Wasting in Despair (English) . . Wilson 
By the Short Cut to the Rosses (Irish) . . Harty 
Black Sheela of the Silver Eye (Irish) . . Harty 

Music Notes 

The Pomona College Choral Club of Claremont 
promises to become a factor in the musical life of 
Los Angeles. Saturday evening, Jan. 18 this or- 
ganization will render, at Simpson Auditorium, 
Mendelssohn's celebrated oratorio., "Elijah". The 
rendition will be under the direction of Prof. F. A. 
Bacon of Pomona College, with Herr Arnold 
Krauss as concert master and with a complete 
force of Symphony Orchestra players. The chorus 
numbers 140 trained voices, some of whom have 
been singing together for over five seasons. The 
soprano will be Madame Genevra Johnstone- 
Bishop ; the contralto Norma Rockhold Robbins ; 
the tenor Abraham Miller. Popular prices will 
prevail, and the seat sale is now on at the Bartlett 
Music Company. 

The arrival of Herbert Witherspoon with his 
orchestration of operatic arias and oratorio num- 
bers gave Director Hamilton and the members of 
the Symphony Orchestra an opportunity for sev- 
eral rehearsals with Mr. Witherspoon before the 
concert Friday at the Auditorium. Mr. Wither- 
spoon was the soloist on this occasion. A discus- 
sion of this concert will be found in these columns 
next week, the performance occurring too late in 1 
the present week for critical notice in this issue. 
* * * 

Ring' Oscar as Artist and "Writer -I 

Another proof that his high reputation every- 
where was based on'inherent merit, and not reflect- 
ed from the office with which he was vested, may be 
found in the assertion, heard from every one who 
came in personal contact with him, that he would 
have made his influence felt in the world no matter 
where fate might have happened to start him. Like 
a majority of the Bernadottes, he was by nature an 
artist, and he gave ample evidence of creative ability 
as well as of keen and catholic appreciation. As a 
poet he produced a few things that not only won 
praise from polite academicians, but went to the 
heart of the people itself. His translations are 
counted among the literary treasures of his coun- 
try; he wrote at least' one play that still possesses 
enough vital power to tempt German managers 
into staging it every now and then; his works on 
military history have been translated into several 
other languages, and his speeches will for a long 
time to come serve as models of Swedish prose. 
Add to this that he displayed on many occasions a 
personal courage rarely found in royal personages 
except on the battlefield, while his familiarity with 



every phase of public business compelled the re- 
spectful hearing even of those least inclined to listen 
to him. The most delicate tact and an irresistible 
charm of manners were joined with a simple maj- 
esty of bearing that caused delighted comment 
wherever he appeared. Not without reason has it 
been said that the kingliest of European sovereigns 
was he who had the least portion of royal blood in 
his veins. And probably it was this happy gift of 
nature, making him look a king in every inch, that 
freed him once for all from the need of any artificial 
protections for his dignity. All through life he 
moved among other men not as a being in a differ- 
ent manner, but as a man. — From "Oscar II., Swed- 
en's Democratic Monarch," by a Swedish-American, 
in the Review of Reviews. 

* * * 
Electric Heat Best 

Flame, as a direct source of heat, is at best a 
faulty servant. In consuming oxygen it pr.oduces 
carbon dioxide and other harmful gases; it waste- 
fully warms huge volumes of inert nitrogen, with 
the result that temperatures are much reduced. If 
the fuel contains sulphur or phosphorus these much 
impair the quality of molten iron or seething steel. 
In dwellings, in mines, on shipboard, the necessary 
consumption of air is a dire evil ; more serious still 
is the outpouring of deadly gases. Flame labors un- 
der other disadvantages. It, is on the outside of a 
crucible or retort that it beats ; the shell to be pene- 
trated, if the steel plate of a big boiler, may be an 
inch thick ; much thicker, and non-conducting as 
well, is the brick wall of a bake-oven. Flame pro- 
duces much heat of little worth because of low 
temperature. The whole Atlantic Ocean might be 
lukewarm and still leave a potato unboiled. It is 
the margin by which a temperature overtops the 
degree needed for boiling, melting or welding that 
decides its value. Yet more : flame at most has a 
play of only a few inches. Even when it raises 
steam, the best of all heat-carriers, that steam may 
be borne no further than a mile without excessive 
loss. All these faults and wastes disappear when, 
instead of flame, we employ electric heat, notwitlv 
standing the cost of its round-about production by 
a furnace, a heat-engine and a dynamo. In many 
cases the engineer can happily dispense with fuel 
altogether, and draw upon a waterfall, as notably at 
Niagara. Electricity, in whatever mode produced, 
may be easily and fully insulated, taken,, if we 
please, 10 miles, and ther, through non-conducting 
mica or asbestos, enter the very heart of a kettle, or 
still, to exert itself as heat, without an iota of sub- 
traction. It has no partner, gaseous or other, to 
work injury or levy a tax. Electricity, too; by a 
transformer, may be readily lifted from low to high 
voltage, or pressure, immensely widening its effec- 
tive play in soldering, welding, smelting. At any 
temperature desired, there, with perfect constancy, 
electric heat may be maintained, with no need 
that a branding or smoothing iron return periodical- 
ly to a fire, with risk of scorching. — From "Elec- 
tricity's Latest Triumphs," by George lies, in tht 
Review of Reviews. 

* * * 
Hose, Anna ! 

A charming young lady named Anna 
Once slipped on a peel of banana, 

And the young man who saw 

Was a wretched outlaw. 
For rudely he snorted, "Hosannah !" 



An,..., c.uro«i. ARTICLES BY LOCAL BANKERS 



January 18. 1908 







u 




SINGLE COPY 10 CENTS 



BY THE YEAR #222 



An Immensely Profitable Time at 
The Fifth Street Store 

Challenge Sale Begins Monday 

One of the biggest merchandising events in Los Angeles retailing. Of 
vital interest from value-getting and money saving standpoints to every 
man, woman and child in Southern 'California. Thirty-eight depart- 
ments ill this institution throw down tihe gauntlet of low prices, and 
defy successful competition, each department manager is determined 
not to be undersold. 

The first installment of bargains will be published in Sunday's 
papers. Keep posted on the daily offerings during this sale. Come 
and bring your friends. , 



"SOA-VET/ 



OING 




BROADWAY 



cor Firm st. 




1 he USE 'IX brand of soaps, polishes and powders is now being 
introduced to the consuming public. The AMERICAN NAPH- 
THA WASHING POWDER is unexcelled for use in the house- 
hold and combined with the "USE IT" SCOURING SOAP 
POWDER make the most formidable array ox cleansers, sola under 
the name of the AMERICAN CLEANSERS, offered on the mar- 
ket today. Ask your grocer for the best and insist on getting the "USE 
IT Brand. ^[Manufactured by The American Commercial Co., Ltd., 
Los Angeles. 




m msmmm 



George Baker Anderson 
EDITOR 



Jt Southwestern Weekly 

Lanier Bartlett 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR 



Howard Clark Galloupe 

ADVERTISING MANAGER 



Published every Saturday at MS--3I9'320 Lissner Build ng. 
Los Angeles. California, by the 

Pacific Outlook Company. 

Subscription price S2.00 a year in advance. Single copy to 
cents on all news stands. 

Entered as second-class matter April 5, ICP7, at the postotfice at Los Angeles, 
California, under the act of Congress of March 1, 1879. 

The Editor of the Pacific Outlook cannot guarantee to return manuscripts, 
though he will endeavor to do so if stamps for that purpose are inclosed with tbem 
If your manuscript is valuable, keep a copy of it. 

Vol. 4. Los Jtngeles, Cat., January IS, 1908 Mo. 3 

NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS 

The Pacific Outlook is mailed to subscribers through 
the Los Angeles Post Office every Friday, and should be 
delivered in every part of the city by Saturday's post. If 
for any reason it should be delayed, or be delivered in 
poor condition, subscribers will confer a favor upon the 
publishers by giving them immediate notice. The date on 
the wrapper shows the time to which your subscription is 
paid as shown by our ledgers. No receipts will be mailed 
unless specially requested. Telephone Home F 7966. 



COMMENT 

THE PACIFIC OUTLOOK is not of a bilious 
temperament. It does not "knock" for the sheer joy 
of hurting. It takes no pleasure in "knocking". It 
would prefer, immeasurably, that instead of giving 
one single "knock" it might find nothing that de- 
served "knocking". But so long as it finds vice and 
corruption in government, in whatever department, 
it will "knock" with all the power at its command. 
It is a fact, unfortunately, that since this paper 
came into beinc it has deemed it its duty to the 
public to speak with frankness concerning certain 

men and institutions which it has 
A Word As believed to be enemies to the public 
to "Knocks" welfare. It has also found that some 

men and institutions had been ma- 
ligned in the public print in Los Angeles — the mo- 
tives of the men impugned, the institutions ridiculed. 
In accordance with the policy which it outlined in 
its first issue it has "knocked" — if the use of this 
term of the street may be pardoned — the first class 
and endeavored to defend the second. It has no 
axes to grind — and it believes that practically every 
regular reader of the paper will assent to the pro- 
position that nothing in the attitude taken by the 
Pacific < hitlook on public questions may be inter- 
preted as having been actuated by base motives. 

* * * 

THERE are times when "every knock is a boost". 
The Pacific Outlook believes that what "knocking" 
it has done will be generally regarded as having 
been necessary to the work of reconstruction which 



is now in progress in Los Angeles and, in fact, 
throughout California, It is true that this paper 
has "knocked" not only the abomination known 
familiarly as the "Espee" machine, but it has 
deemed it to be its duty to "knock" the clique of 
corporation men and politicians who seem bent 
upon doing their utmost to loot the city, to maintain 
boss rule, to undo the work which was done in 
part in the fall election of 1906. The enemies which 
the Pacific Outlook may have made as the result 
of its efforts in this direction it welcomes 
The Call as such. The friends it has made by pur- 
of Duty suing this policy it esteems. But, regard- 
less of how many enemies it may make 
through its continued attacks upon those men and 
institutions which it firmly believes to be inimical 
to municipal progress, to popular government in 
city, county or state, it will continue to "knock", if 
"knocking" such a course be. While it has at- 
tacked, it has defended ; while it has found fault, it 
has praised. In the midst of its "knocking" it has 
sprung to the defense of many good public servants 
and other men who have been unjustly assailed. It 
has not "knocked" that it might do harm : it has 
"knocked" that it might help clear the way to the 
building of new foundations of a stable character. 
The Pacific Outlook invites friends of good govern- 
ment to criticise its policy in this direction. 
* * * 

PROBABLY never before in the history of Cali- 
fornia has a court decision more completely 
astounded the. inhabitants of this state than did the 
decision of the Court of Appeals of San Francisco 
in the case of ex-Mayor Schmitz, who appealed 
from the judgment of the trial court in the extor- 
tion charge against him. With remarkable unan- 
imity the press and many of the best lawyers of 
the state, including even Judge Dunne, before 
whom the case was tried, have joined in condemn- 
ing- the action of the appellate court. The San 
Francisco Call echoes the best public 
Bad Law, sentiment, as expressed by the lead- 
Bad Morals ing newspapers of the state, in char- 
acterizing the decision of the Court 
of Appeals as based upon "bad law, bad logic and 
bad morals." The Sacramento Union declares that 
the decision "has outlawed a once honorable pro- 
fession." It adds that it "has legalized graft and 
made of it a recognized department of the practice 
of law in this state. Not since the Savior of Men 
anathematized the legal profession has such damna- 



Pacific Outlook 



tory utterance concerning the profession of the law 
fallen from human lips as the decision of that court 
in the Schmitz case." The tenor of the views ex- 
pressed by the leading editors of the state, with 
very rare exceptions, is the same. 

* ¥ 9 

IN THE WORDS of one of the newspapers the 
action of the appellate court is "a body blow to the 
bar" of California. That the court was unduly in- 
fluenced by the association of its members with the 
political bosses of San Francisco is the general 
opinion. Judge Dunne himself pronounced this 
judgment on the remarkable decision. All three of 
the judges are related by marriage to men more or 
less intimately identified with the defense of Ruef, 

Schmitz and the other elements 

The Court's inimical to the reign of law and 

Frame of Mind order in San Francisco. Two of 

them are the product of the in- 
famous Santa Cruz convention purchased with 
$14,000 furnished by the political machine then in 
control of the state. The fact that this decision was 
handed down within fifteen hours after the final 
papers in the appeal of Schmitz had been filed with 
the court indicates that this court broke all records 
for quick work. Intelligent men, both lawyers and 
laymen, are not convinced that the contentions of 
the court are quite sound, but whether the higher 
court will be. asked to pass upon the question re- 
mains to be seen. 

* * * 

IF THE DAW as laid down by this court is 
good law, based on sound logic, what does it mean ? 
It means that the way has been opened by which 
extortion in its worst forms may be practiced in 
California hereafter with the utmost impunity. It 
means that any individual, whether a public official 
or a private citizen, may levy blackmail without 
the slightest fear that he will ever be punished for 
his offense. It means that every police department 

and every shrievalty may legally 

Possibilities become the avenue of extortion. It 

for the Future means that a police officer, high or 

low, or a conscienceless attorney, 
like Abraham Ruef, may conduct "protection" 
bureaus of the San Francisco stripe, holding over 
the heads of saloonists and proprietors of houses 
of prostitution and of gambling dens the promise 
of immunity from the law if, in return for such pro- 
tection, they will engage such police officer or such 
attorney as his go-between. From every viewpoint 
it is unthinkable that any legislature ever intended 
to enact a statute of the character defined by the 
appellate court of San Francisco. 

* * * 

BUT THERE is another side to the question : 
Out of the evil which decent men believe the appel- 
late court has done in this instance, good is bound 



to come. So thoroughly convinced has the average 
man of clean mind, wholesome aspirations and de- 
sire to behold the rehabilitation of those essentials 
to good government which are diametrically op- 
posed to graft and corruption become that he now 
sees but one loophole of escape from the snare set 
by this astounding definition of the crime of ex- 
tortion. The only way in which the evils com- 
plained of may be overcome, in the judgment of 
many men — and the number is 
Out of Evil increasing rapidly since the ac- 

Will Come Good tion of the court became known 
— is through united political ac- 
tion to the end that the next legislature shall bo 
composed, for the greater part at least, of men who 
will go to Sacramento under definite pledge to enact 
laws which will render a repetition of the history 
of the past year in San Francisco an impossibility. 
California needs a house-cleaning from top to bot- 
tom. Inasmuch as nothing whatever is to be ex- 
pected of the Republican party as at present con- 
stituted, and as the Republican party is and prob- 
ably for a long time to come will be the dominant 
party in this state, it is through the purification of 
that party that the results sought must be attained. 

* * * 

IN THE OPINION of the Pacific Outlook the 
Lincoln-Roosevelt Republican League points the 
only certain way in which the needed reforms may 
be brought about. The aims of this organization 
have been fully set forth, from time to time, through 
those newspapers of the state which do not come 
under the class which has aptly been characterized 
as the "purchased" press. First and foremost, the 
aim of this organization is the adoption of meas- 
ures which will result in the complete elimination 

of the Southern Pacific as a factor in 
The Only the politics of this state. It aims, first,. 
Solution at securing control of the primaries in 

order that the conventions of the party, 
state, county and city, shall, in turn, be controlled 
by the honest citizens of the state. It aims, second, 
at the nomination of men sworn to employ every 
possible effort to unhorse the political bosses, like 
Herrin and his satellites. It aims, third, to secure 
the passage of laws which will prevent in the fu- 
ture a repetition of the great scandals which' have 
made the name of California a term of reproach on 
the lips of decent people from one side of the con- 
tinent to the other. 

* * * 

THE GROWTH of the movement inaugurated 
by the league has passed far beyond the point which 
it was believed could possibly be reached by this 
time. The people of California, almost regardless 
of politics, have arisen almost spontaneously to 
rally about the standard raised by the league. From 
one end of the state to the other Lincoln-Roosevelt 



Pacific Outlook 



Republican Clubs have been organized, and will 
continue to be organized until practically all the in- 
dependent Republican voters of the state have en- 

1 their names in support of the cause of g 

rnment. The "fake" Taft clubs, as they have 
become known, have Fooled nobody — 
Strength not even their promoters. They are 
in Union now thoroughly recognized as being in- 
tend counter to the genuine Re- 
publican clubs. When we say "genuine" Republi- 
can clubs, we mean those chilis which are composed 
of Republicans, as distinguished from those clubs 
organized by the Southern Pacific bosses and their 
lieutenants. Although the clean and decent element 
in the Republican party is responsible for the or-. 
ganization of the Lincoln-Roosevelt Clubs, we see 
no reason on earth why the high principles for 
which these organizations stand should not be 
heartily supported by citizens of both parties who 
believe that the time has come when there should 
be a return to genuine popular government. 

* * * 

NO INTELLIGENT MAN will deny that popu- 
lar government in this state is and for many years, 
has been the veriest farce. For years California 
has stood as the most conspicuous example, in the 
entire sisterhood of states, of the political degener- 
ate. By the confessions of the bosses themselves 
popular government has long since gone by the 
board. They have said, time and time again, in de- 
fense of their purchase of legislatures, governors 
and courts, that this policy has been deemed by 

them necessary in order that the 
Which Is ''rights" of the railroad corporation 
Supreme? might be maintained. If this is true, 

and nobody — not even the bosses them- 
selves — will deny it, then, indeed, has popular gov- 
ernment become a thing of the past; for nobody 
will raise so absurd a contention as that the rail- 
roads and the people themselves can rule at the 
same time. If there is not to be found in this ad- 
mission of the railroads — that they need to control 
public officials in order that the interests of these 
corporations may be defended — a sound basis for 
the contention that there is no such thing as popu- 
lar government, what sort of evidence will the peo- 
ple demand ? 

* * * 

Hiram \Y. Johnson, one of the ablest lawyers of 
the state, in commenting on this remarkable decree 
has directed attention to the fact that the court 
overlooked a large number of the most important 
cases of exactly analogous character. He makes 
these points, among others: "In each instance 
where an 'unlawful injury' is discussed the bail 
character of the business conducted is gratuitously 
interjected in the opinion of the appellate court. 
There was no such question in the case at all. In 
Xew York a labor union agitator said:: 'I'll prevent 



your doing business bj .yetting your men to leave 
your employment unless you pay me.' Money was 
paid and the labor agitator was convicted of extor- 
tion. The court said while he had a perfect right 
to get employees to leave their employ- 
Parallel ment he had no right to threaten to get 
Cases them to leave unless he was paid a cer- 
tain sum, and when he did thus threaten 
and extort money thereby he was guilty of extor- 
tion. Extortion under the law of New York is 
exactly the same as under our law. In California 
Ruef and Schmitz had the right to oppose a liquor 
license, but when they threatened opposition and 
threatened to prevent a business from being carried 
on unless they were paid a certain sum, and did 
obtain that sum by such threat, they were guilty of 
extortion. In New York there were two decisions 
of that character. We have taken more of our lav/ 
from New York than from all other states com- 
bined ; yet these decisions of New Y'ork's highest 
and the Union's most distinguished court not only- 
do not prevail, but are not given even a passing 
notice." 

* * * 

IT BEGINS to look as if the city had been 
bunkoed in the arrangements it made with the 
Southern Pacific railroad for the transportation of 
the materials to be used in the construction of the 
Oiyens river conduit. Still there is nothing strange 
about that, when we stop to consider it. If the 
Southern Pacific has not made an effort to hold up 
the city in this matter that fact has not yet been 
made apparent. When negotiations with the rail- 
road company were being conducted two sets of 
schedules of transportation charges were consid- 
ered. One of these provided for a rate of about five 
and one-half to six cents per ton mlie ; the other 
provided for a rate of about a cent per ton mile less, 

this concession being made by the city 
Is It a with the understanding that the railroad 
Bunko? would be privileged to select the routes 

over which the freight is to be transported 
from eastern points. This exclusive routing privi- 
lege is estimated to be worth to the Southern Pa- 
cific at least $100,000. But now the railroad insists 
upon receiving the higher rate and the routing 
privilege too. These are the facts as set forth in 
the local press. If they can be proven it would ap- 
pear that whoever was responsible for the drawing 
of the contract with the railroad company blundered 
beautifully. The more quickly and more thorough- 
ly the matter is sifted to the bottom the better satis- 
fied will the taxpayers of Los Angeles be. It is too 
early to permit any attempt at graft to pass without 
the most emphatic protest and the most rigid in- 
vestigation. 

* * * 

IX A COMMUNICATION to the Express re- 
cently Charles J. Xoyes. in arraigning the interests 



Pacific Outlook 



which seek to keep the Southern Pacific in power 
in politics in this state, pointed out the unwisdom oE 
the policy of this corporation in these words: "And 
if great corporations were managed by men wise 
enough to foresee that the machines they thus built 
up and put in motion would some day surely be- 
come the most dangerous menace to their rights 
and privileges and the wicked- 
Authors of Their est enemy they would have to 
Own Undoing meet and deal with in legisla- 
tive halls and elsewhere, these 
malign conditions would soon naturally disappear, 
and the corporations would easily secure all they 
were entitled to without the serious drain on their 
treasuries which they now experience and be for- 
ever exempt from the attack of legislative 1 black- 
mailers." Little by little the corporations of the 
country are reaching the same conclusion. There 
has been a remarkable change in corporation senti- 
ment in this direction during the past few months. 
The new idea does not appear to have struck the 
Southern Pacific politicians in California yet, but 
it will, in due time. 

* * * 

WHILE "war talk" is to be deplored just at this 
juncture, it can hardly be denied that the report 
which came by Associated Press from Honolulu 
during the week to the effect that the awards for 
bids had been held up by the War Department "for 
the reason that it is believed that the lowest bidder 
is a dummy for some Japanese contractors", is very 
suggestive. It was further reported that in ali 
probability every bid would be rejected and the 
War Department would conduct the work itself. 
Part of the significance of this news is the fact that 
the brief statement was tucked away 
A Significant under inconspicuous headlines in 

Suspicion papers in which it appeared. This 
often is a sign, when government 
news is in question, that Washington considers the 
news so serious as to request that it be "held down" 
by such papers as are allowed to handle it. That, 
the War Department is sufficiently suspicious of a 
Japanese attempt at trickery to be on its guard 
against Japanese contractors, is in itself disquieting. 
Undoubtedly the only safe and sensible way for our 
government to erect fortifications in outlyong pos- 
sessions where an alien and distrusted population is 
large, is to keep the work entirely in its own hands. 

* * * 

THE REPORT from Madrid to the effect thai- 
King Alfonso is contemplating a "relatives-we-love- 
you" tour of Mexico and the lesser Latin-American 
republics suggests many possibilities and is an- 
other proof added to the several which the trend of 
events has recently produced that the world, in- 
stead of hastening into universal brotherhood, still 
is actuated in its larger occurrences by national and 
racial prejudices and predilections. Of late the na- 



tions and the races have been "taking parts" with 
unmistakable outspokenness in the face of a, per- 
haps far-distant but surely approaching world- 
crisis — we refer to the political, national 
Race world, of course, not to the physical 
Instinct earth — and more and more does orga- 
nized humanity seem to be falling into 
line of battle under the separate and varying ban- 
ners of race. There is a decided antipathy being 
developed between the yellow peoples and the na- 
tions of Anglo-Saxon descent. And while the Latin 
nations are composed of what may properly be 
termed white men of the same root-race as the lat- 
ter, still there is a distinctive race-uncongeniality 
.between the bloods which is constantly expressing 
itself through their national lives. This is made 
plain' by the following quotations from "El Im- 
parcial" (mind you, "The Imparcial"), a leading 
newspaper of Madrid, which says, under the cap- 
tion of "Race Obligations": 
* * » 
"SPAIN'S FUTURE lies in America. As Latins 
it is our duty to restore the hegemony of our race, 
which has fallen before the onsweep of the Anglo- 
Saxons. As the ancient world was filled with the 
struggle between Europe and Africa, so is the mod- 
ern world occupied with the struggle between the 
Latin and the Anglo-Saxon. The ultimate result 
will depend more upon culture than military force. 
Spain can represent the role of spiritual Rome 
against the absorbing industrialism of the Yankees. 
Our revenge for Cavite and Santiago must come 
from this side, and the first step must be King Al- 
fonso's visit to the Hispano-American countries. 
!|s * * * " The fact that such an expression 
can emanate from Spain after all the bitterness that 
has come between her and her former colonies 
shows the strength of the elemental blood tie ; and 
peoples will continue to group, in time of stress, 

by instinct for a long time yet and 
Survival of shape history by racial competition, 
the Fittest just as all history has been shaped in 

the past. Though "culture" may at 
times be substituted for "military force" as sug- 
gested above, nevertheless the struggle is precipi- 
tated by race jealousy. After all, it is necessary to 
the progress of the world that some deep feeling- 
should keep alive the spirit of competition, for if 
the socialistic principle which would end all strug- 
gle between individuals were applied to nations, 
the finer, larger progress of peoples at large would 
be smothered under a universal stagnation. Latin 
Europe cries instinctively to Latin America, "Come, 
stand up to the northern race which is outdoing 
you !" and Latin America will respond, inevitably, 
by force of an instinct stronger than all universal 
brotherhood principles. And whether it be a strug- 
gle of commerce, or culture, or arms, both sides are 
bound to benefit ultimately thereby in the whetting 
pi ambition to excel, and the world will benefit by 
the resulting elimination of the least fit of the two. 



Pacific Outlook 



7 



WHAT NOTED PEOPLE! SAT 



China Stirs 
F. A Cari,, American Official <>p Chinese 
Government 
That China has at last awakened from her long 
sleep of centuries no student of Chinese affairs can 
now deny. All over the vast empire, one-sixth 
greater than the combined areas of the United 
States, including Alaska, containing- a population 
iver four hundred millions, an earnest desire for 
change lias set in, and .like the incoming tide, the 
movement is sweeping all before it. The death- 
knell of ultra-conservatism has sounded, and the 
era of new and progressive ideas has dawned. 



Power of Wealth 

Albert j: Beveridge 

There are few thing's that immense wealth can 
not accomplish. Xot only can it erect bridges, 
build railroads, raise libraries, found universities, 
life the spires of churches; it can also corrupt legis- 
latures, pass laws, defeat reforms, buy newspapers 
for deceiving the people. All these things, both 
1 and bad. vast wealth has done, is doing and 
will do. This dimly shows something of the scope 
of the concrete power of tremendous riches and, 
therefore, the evil possibilities — nay certainties — if 
such riches in individual hands are transmitted to 
other individual hands in perpetual succession ever 
increasing in volume without the heirs of them ever 
earning a dollar of that increase or contribution, by 
the slightest personal effort, to the common good 
and happiness of mankind. 



Special Privileges to None 

Wili iam Jennings Bryan 

Upon a careful consideration of the subject one 
must be convinced that the remedy for swollen 
fortunes is to me found in a return to the Jefferson - 
ian doctrine: equal rights to all and special privi- 
leges to none. Where we find unearned fortunes, 
we find that in nearly every case they rest upon 
favors granted by the government, and in too many 
instances the injustice has been aggravated by in- 
equalities in the tax law, so that the very ones who 
owe their great wealth to the generosity of the gov- 
ernment shirk their taxes and shift to the shoulders 
of others the burdens which they themselves 
should bear. 

Now that public attention has been turned to the 
ethics of money making, it is to be hoped that the 
awakening will result in the inauguration of such 
thorough reform that all citizens will be put upon 
the same footing and treated with equal considera- 
tion in the creation of wealth and in the payment 
of the taxes necessary to support the national gov- 
ernment. 



Government of Cities 

John Fiske 
I was lately assured by a gentleman in a city 
which I will not name, but more than a thousand 
miles from here, that the only cure for the ac- 
cumulated wrongs of that community would be an 
occasional coup d'etat, with the massacre of all the 
city officers. So the last word of our boasted prog- 



ress, when it comes to municipal government, is 
declared to be the ( iriental idea of "despotism tem- 
pered h\ assassination." Now to what cause or 

causes are we to ascribe the contrast between Cam- 
bridge and the cities that are so wretchedly gov- 
erned? The answer is. that in Cambridge we keep 
city government clear of polities, we do not mix 
up municipal questions with national questions. If 
1 may repeate what 1 have said elsewhere, "since 
the object of a municipal election is simply to se- 
cure an upright and efficient municipal government, 
to elect a city magistrate because he is a- Repub- 
lican or a Democrat is about as sensible as to elect 
him because he believes in homoepathy or has a 
taste for chrysanthemums." Upon this plain and 
obvious principle of commonsense our city has 
acted on the whole with remarkable success during 
its half century of municipal existence. The results 
we see all about us, and the example may be com- 
mended as an object lesson to all who are interested 
in the most vital work that can occupy the mind of 
an American — the work of elevating the moral tone 
of public life. For it is neither wealth nor power, 
nor cunning nor craft that exalts a nation, but 
righteousness and the fear of the Lord. 

* * * ■ 

Navajo Dictionary 

A report from New Mexico says that the Francis- 
can Fathers at St. Michael's, Arizona, near Gallup, 
propose publishing in the near future a dictionary 
of the Navajo language, upon which they have 
been engaged for the past ten years. The book, be- 
sides containing a vocabulary as complete as is 
possible to be obtained, will also have a series of 
articles on Navajo religion, ceremonies, arts and. 
industries, each to be followed by a list of the 
Navajo terms employed, with more or less detailed 
explanation. The descriptive text will comprise 
articles on the industries, weaving dyeing, silver 
working and basket making, also lists of Navajo 
names of persons and places, and names of plants 
and animals. This book, when issued from the 
press, will likely be very much in demand by stu- 
dents of Indian lore, as it will be a great step to- 
ward unraveling the early history of the Navajos. 
It is hard to realize the immense amount of work 
expended on a work of this kind. The language of 
the Navajos is a very difficult one to acquire, owing 
to there being no distinct pronunciation of the 
words, a gutteral sound predominating. 

* * * 

U/>e Road Hog 

His eyes are ablaze with a furious gaze 

At his blinded and helpless prey; 
His lingering breath is the track of the death 

That he scatters along his way: 
His menacing snort is as deep and short 

As the bay of a savage hound. 
His ominous growl, like a jungle a-prowl, 

Makes many a scared heart bound. 

With etiquette fine as the manners of swine. 

He sticks to his hogskin seat, 
TTis treacherous tyres and his petulant fires 

At ever-increasing heat; 
A tyrant he in a land so free 

That nobody says him nay. 
A masked ghoul with a drawn-steel soul, 

He scatters the babes at play. 

— London Chronicle. 



Pacific Outlook 




u?~ 



The Pacific Outlook believes that the following articles on different phases of the local business 
situation from the pens of men who are recognized authorities on financial subjects will prove most 
interesting and encouraging. Mr. Jess reviews the financial flurry, its causes, effect and probable 
outcome; Mr. Graves makes some valuable suggestions concerning that factor which he considers real- 
ly the most important asset of this vicinity, our tourist trade; and Mr. Elliott, in a summing up of the 
amounts paid out this month in dividends by Los Angeles financial institutions, gives striking proof of 
the strength of this city's business foundation. 



BANKS SAVED LOCAL SITUATION 



By Stoddard Jess, Vice-President First National 
Bank 



To one not a student of finance it would seem 
unnatural and unnecessary for our country to have 
experienced such an acute and widespread financial 
upheaval as we have witnessed during the past few 
weeks. All conditions existing appeared on the 
surface to be those of prosperity. We have had 
good crops for several successive years that have 
been disposed of- at high prices ; our mills and fac- 




Stoddard Jess 

Vice President First National Bank 

tories have been running at full blast, with a de- 
mand so great that our markets are bare of manu- 
factured goods ; labor 'has been well employed at 
high wages ; and our miners have been adding to 
our store of wealth as never before. Any yet, with 
all of these elements of prosperity we have had a 
panic that has been felt in every hamlet in the land. 
The panic was the result of many causes. 

During the past few years the destruction of 
wealth by wars and earthquakes has amounted to 
several billions of dollars, and this vast amount 
of capital if it had not been destroyed would have 
been available for useful works of value to man. 
The unprecedented prosperity of the past few years 
has made it necessary for the railroads to expand 
vast sums in rolling stock, in motive power, in 



terminal facilities and in general betterment to take 
care of the ever increasing demand for transporta- 
tion facilities. Manufacturers have been obliged to 
increase their capacity by .building new buildings 
and installing new machinery to enable them to 
fill the orders pouring in upon them ; and the mer- 
chants have filled larger storerooms with more 
goods to meet the rapidly expanding business that 
has come to them. All this capital that has been 
invested in permanent improvements no longer ex- 
ists in available form for other purposes. The ex- 
travagance of the times, the cost of living which 
has increased so markedly during the past few 
years, the extreme luxuries of yesterday having be- 
come the necessities of today, has had its effect. 
Over-speculation, establishing fictitious values of 
stocks and bonds, as well as of real property, re- 
sulted in making up total values until they were 
entirely disproportionate to the amount of ireal 
money on which the values were based. High 
prices of labor and all commodities have tended not 
a little to bring about present conditions by cheap- 
ening the purchasing power of our money and thus 
lessening the amount of work it is- able to do. But 
the most potent cause was that owing to serious 
defects in our currency system, at a critical time we 
found ourselves with an insufficient amount of cir- 
culating medium to meet the demands upon it, and 
without any adequate remedy at hand. 

There is not a financier in the whole country thai: 
has not known for the past twenty years that when 
a certain combination of conditions prevailed, with 
our absolutely inflexible and inelastic circulating 
medium, a money famine would strike us that 
would be far-reaching and disastrous in its effects. 

Under normal conditions there is a plethora of 
money in the money centers during the spring and 
summer months entirely sufficient to meet the de- 
mand which arises in the fall to move the crops. 
With the unprecedented business activity of the 
past year the demand for money was so great that 
it was kept actively employed during the spring 
and summer, so that when the demand came in the 
fall from the South and West to move the cotton 
and the grain crops, there was no money available 
in the money centers for the purpose. The only 
possible way for banks in the central reserve cities 
to supply the demand was to call in their loans. 
This necessitated forcing securities on the market 
at a time when there was no money available for 
investment and resulted in tumbling down the 
prices of stock and bonds until the market was in 
a panicky condition. Just at this crisis and when 
the public mind was excited over, conditions in 
Wall Street, Mr. F. Augustus Heinze, a daring 



Pacific Outlook 



-peculator in copper stocks, made an attempt to 

manipulate certain st'>eks in which he was inn 

and with the result that he failed t<> meet hi- 

g ttions on the Stock Exchange. This of itsel 

; not have had any far-reaching effect if it hat! 

not been for the fact that Mr. Heinze had recently 

ne the president of trie Mercantile National 

Bank of New York City and was interested in SI i 
oral other hanks. The public at once associated hi- 
bank'connections with his failure, and at once com 

menced a run on the Heinze hanks, which, as is fre- 
quently the case, whether actuated by reason or 

in »t . caused runs on certain other hanks and trust 
companies, and resulted in a withdrawal of confi- 
dence on the part of the people, making it desirable 
For the hanks to go on a clearing house basis to pro- 
tect the general situation throughout the country. 

The great service rendered by the hanks in suc- 
cessfully controlling the situation, even though it 
was by what might be considered high-handed 
methods, enabling all business to continue without 
interruption, and with no greater cost than some 
inconvenience to the depositors, will never be fully 
understood. Had the hanks not taken the extreme 
position they did. but allowed the money to he 
withdrawn and hoarded, the effects would have been 
disastrous — the wheels of industrv would neccs- 
sarilv have stopped, labor would have been out of 
employment, and the list of failures of merchants 
and manufacturers through the necessity that 
would have come for rapid liquidation, would have 
been appalling. Because the situation was con- 
trolled the effects will be nothing like as disastrous 
nor as lasting- as would otherwise have been the 
case. 

When the clouds roll by and conditions again be- 
come normal, readjustment will necessitate a certain 
amount of liquidation and times will necessarily 
slow down, but with a continuation of good crops 
and attendant demands on the transportation com- 
panies and with no glut of manufactured goods in 
the country in any line, there must be continued 
activity and a fair demand for labor. All conditions 
seem favorable to a speedy recovery. There is no 
city in the country that has had a greater share of 
prosperity than has Los Angeles during the past 
few years. The growth of the city has been phe- 
nomenal, and particularly since the San Francisco 
disaster the expansion of the business interests ha-. 
been almost beyond comparison. An ever increas- 
ing amount of capital has been required to finance 
the rapidly expanding business activities. For 
these reasons, one might suppose that the shock 
produced by the panic would have been more se- 
vere in Los Angeles than in many other places. 
Immediately after the San Francicso disaster the 
I. os Angeles banks seemed to realize the extra- 
ordinary demand for money that the future held in 
store, and with one accord refused to supply capital 
to finance activities of a speculative nature. 
Through this foresight, the banks of Los Angeles 
have found it possible to protect the business inter- 
ests of the city and at the same time to keep in i 
most satisfactory condition to meet the shock that 
has come to them in the present crisis. 

Los Angek-s may congratulate herself that the 
shock here was not as severe as in many places, that- 
trade has remained good and the other activities 
of the city have continued uninterrupted, that her 
hanks are strong enough to stand the test that has 




25% 



Reduction on Men's 

Overcoats and 

Rain Coats 



These are Chesterfield garments in a wide variety of 
worthy fabrics and tasteful patterns. Present day 
styles — smart effects for young men, more conservative 
garments for those who prefer them. * Original prices 
were from $20 to $80 — a range that will show you the 
variety of garments in stock. Now all are offered at 
one-fourth off regu'ar prices. 

MATHESON CgX BERNER 

Broadway, Cor. 3rd 



B 



Not Connected With Other Stores 



uy Furniture of Quality. 



■P*P Good clean pieces that have the material and making to show their 
superiority; classic furniture, carpets and draperies that are up to the highest 
standard of perfection. Our stock is composed entirely of such qualities. Our 
prices are right. 

Prompt Delivery in Per/eel Condition 

jE/unilhirt do* 

*«- 640-646 SOUTH HILL ST. * 



Japanese and Oriental 

ART CURIOS 

KIMONAS AND EMBROIDERIES 

You make no mistake when buying .of us, as we 
keep only genuine articles of the highest quality — 
our prices are reasonable. 

Kafyuchi Bros. iHSSL 

533 South Broadway 



Wayne Vibratory Institute 

315-16-17 Lissner Btig. - 524 South Spring Street 
Lcs Angeles, Cal. 

IS AN INSTITUTION where scientific VIBRATORY MAS- 
SAGE is given. Our operator is one of the most expert vibra- 
tionists in the United States, having gained his experience in the New 
York clinic, the largest and best appointed Vibratory Clinic in the 
world. 

It has been clearly demonstrated, that in nervous disorders and 
many other chronic ailments, more definite results are obtained by 
Vibratory treatment than by any other means. 

We have the best equipped treatment rooms in Los Angeles. 
Experienced nurse in attendance to assist with ladies and children. 

Hours 9 to 5. Evenings and Sundays by appointment. 
Home Phone F 5178. 



10 



Pacific Outlook 



been put upon them ; and because of the many at- 
tractions her soil and climate offer, she enjoys an 
active immigration of the best people of the East 
and North which ensures a shorter period of de- 
pression for Los Angeles than almost any other 
city. 

As long as the pendulum swings it will always 
pass the meridian line ; as long as the world lasts 
prosperity will be followed by depression. It is 
the law of the universe and we cannot change it, 
but we can adopt measures to intelligently control 
situations and conditions as they arise. Under the 
monetary systems of .every other civilized country 
on the face of the globe the extraordinary demand 
for money to move the crops last fall could and 
would have been met by an issuance of an extra 
supply of money for the purpose. England through 
the Bank of England, Fiance through the Bank of 
France, German}' through its Imperial Bank, or 
Canada through the mechanism of its banking sys- 
tem — all could and would have met the extraordin- 
ary demand without precipitating any crisis. 

The necessity for making some provision for a 
flexible and elastic circulating medium is as well 
known to our Congressmen as to our financiers, 
and after the recent lesson we have had in the 
costly school of experience, needed legislation will 
be enacted to provide an adequate remedy. 



EFFECT OF THE TOUlRIST 

ON OUR FINANCES 



By J. A. Graves, Vilce-President Farmers and Mer- 
chants National Bank and President Los 
Angeles Clearing House Association 



It is interesting to watch the evolution of the in- 
dustries of a community. Coming to Los Angeles 
in June, 1875, I have had an abundant opportunity 
to note our industrial changes. At the time the 
only railroad leading out of Los Angeles was the 
one to San Pedro ; the road to San Francisco was 
finished only as far as San Fernando (the gap from 
Bakersfield to San Fernando being still open). The 
line to New Orleans extended oniy as far as Spadra. 
Everything consumed in the community, except 
meat and some fruits, was brought from San Fran- 
cisco by water to San Pedro. The city of Los An- 
geles was a small village with but a few thousand 
inhabitants, without sewers, without public build- 
ings, with dirt streets, possessing a crude water 
supply, and apparently without ambition. The 
population of the county was scant. The entire 
registration of voters for Los Angeles County, 
which then included Orange County, for the year 
187S was but 2,700. 

We had not yet begun to raise grain here in com- 
mercial quantities. Orange growing was in its in- 
fancy. Vast tracts of land, now highly cultivated, 
were devoted to sheep pasture. Even then we had. 
a tourist trade. True, it was light, but we were 
sowing the seed of the crop we have since been 
reaping-. 

Distinguished writers visited us by chance. 
They went away enchanted, and heralded the 
charms of this locality far and wide, verbally, in 
magazine articles, and through the newspapers. 
Suddenly we awoke to the fact that we had another 
asset among our possibilities — namely, climate. 



TLhc 

Commercial IRational 

Bank 



Will Remove in a Few Days 
to 



New and Enlarged Quarters 



Southwest Corner 
Fourth and Spring 



(Angelus Hotel) 



Capital and Surplus 
Assets - - • 



- $240,000.00 
$1,700,000.00 



TLhe Citizen's 

IRattonal 

Bank 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

THIRD AND MAIN STREETS 



(Capital $300,000.00 

Surplus and Profits 400,000.00 



UNITED STATES DEPOSITORY 



SOLICITS THE ACCOUNTS OF CORPORA- 
TIONS, FIRMS AND INDIVIDUALS, AND 
PROMISES AS LIBERAL TREATMENT AS 
CONSERVATIVE BANKING WILL ALLOW. 



Officers 
R. J. Waters, President. 
J. Ross Clark, Vice-President. 
A. J. Waters, Cashier. 
Geo. E. F. Dnffet, Ass't. Cashier. 
E. T. Pettigrew, Ass't. ^Cashier. 



Pacific Outlook 



11 



The Southern Pacific became a transcontinental line 
utliern route. More people came to us: 
Santa Fe was built, and a bigger influx resulted. 
< >ur large ranches wore cut up. Orange groves 
sprang into existence where sagebrush recently 
grew. Even drop of stream or canyon water was 

rved and devoted to some useful purpi 
Each settler from the frozen Fast had friends and 
relatives at home, who came out here to see t!v 
try. They visited. us as tourists, but many of 
them returned to remain permanently. We pro- 
gressed — our cities grew. We built better build- 
ings, better hotels, better roads, belter street car 
ns, better gardens, more attractive homes, anil 
the fame of it all went to the four quarters of the 
globe. In the meantime the climate was at work-. 
Our own people learned to appreciate it, and its 
virtues began to be known everywhere. Catalina 
Island and our beach cities were exploited as pleas- 
ure resorts, and without knowing' it we soon be- 
came the Mecca of the American tourist trade. 

A recent magazine article gives the annual in- 
come of ['ranee from her tourists at $500,000,000; 
of Egypt, S< ..000.000: of Switzerland. $40,000,000. 
of Italy, $100,000,000: of Egypt, $6,000,000; of 
Switzerland, $40,000,000, and of far off Norway. 
|3,000,000. It is estimated that Americans spend 
in foreign lands $330,000,000 annually. These fig- 
ures show the possibilities ahead of us. We must 
divert more of that money to this section. 

While the orange crop of Southern California is 
bringing us from '$20,000,000 to $30,000,000 a year, 
.uiil our deciduous fruits, walnuts, celery, vege- 
tables, hay, grain, sugar beets, oil and other pro- 
ducts yield us annually much more than the orange 
crop — still our greatest asset is climate, and our 
best crop, the tourist crop. They come annually to 
every part of Southern Caifornia. Every city, town, 
village and hamlet gets its share of the tourists' 
money. They bring to us money in the shape of 
currency, by letters of credit, and eastern drafts 
which go into immediate circulation. They come 
for a vacation, for rest, recreation and enjoyment, 
and they are willing to pay for it. We are not yet 
in position to properly entertain them. We want 
more hotels and better roads. The day will come, 
when we will realize as much from this great in- 
dustry as any of the countries of Europe. Our 
bank deposits immediately show the effect of the 
tourist travel as soon as- the season opens. To the 
influence of tourists I attribute, in large part, our 
wonderful development. 

The exploitation of the wonderful mineral regions 
of Colorado. Nevada and Arizona, coupled with the 
completion of the San Pedro. Los Angeles and Salt 
Lake Railway to Salt Lake City, has resulted in 
sending us a larger summer population who come 
here to enjoy our seashore and mountain resorts 
and to escape the summer climate of their own lo- 
cation, so that of late years summer has found 
nearly as many with us as the winter season. 

We want to cultivate this clement of our pros- 
perity. We should lay out and maintain more 
parks, improve our roads and build mountain 
driveways. We should develop the natural beau- 
tics of our country: make it as attractive as France, 
and every dollar so spent will come back to us a 
thousand fold. 

France. Germany, Switzerland. Spain ami the 
state- bordering on the Mediterranean have awak- 
ened to the possibilities of the tourist trade and are 



Choosing a Bank 



IS \ VERY IMPORTANT UNDER- 
TAKING AND SHOULD BE CARE 
FULLY CONSI/DERED; PARTICU- 
LARLY THE STRENGTH OF THE 
INSTITUTION. THIS BANK IS 
OWNED BY THE STOCKHOLDERS 
OF THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK 
OF LOS ANGELES WHICH DOUBT- 
LESS IS A SUFFICIENT GUARAN 
TEE OF OUR STABILITY. WE IN- 
VITE YOUR PATRONAGE. : 



Metropolitan Bank ano 
{Trust Co. 

N. W. Corner Sixth and Spring Streets, 
Los Angeles, Cal. 



Central tTrust 
Company 



BRYSON BUILDING 
Second and Spring Streets 

.Interest Paid on Deposits. 

Safe ^Deposit Boxes 
For "Rent 



A general banking business transacted. 



12 



Pacific Outlook 



cultivating it. We should do likewise. We are 
today the best advertised section of the Unite:'. 
States, thanks to our transportation companies, and 
to a real, live, energetic Chamber of Commerce. 



JANUARY DIVIDENDS 

By L. L. Elliott, President Columbia Trust Co 
One million eight hundred and odd thousand 
dollars is the amount of interest and dividends 
paid in Los Angeles on January first by the banks 
and corporations reporting their transactions. In 
addition to this sum it is estimated that a quarter 
of a million more was paid by smaller corporations 
glutei na'HEScliiiiis iH e not public property; this 
aiinii i 1 lepresaiila I wiini- animal paymenfof near- 
ly seven dollars each for every man, woman and 
child in Los Angeles. 

The year just closed, notwithstanding the flurry 
which marked the closing months, has been a prof- 
itable one for the banks and public service corpora- 
tions, and earnings have been satisfactory in prac- 
tically all cases ; no default in payment of interest 
on bonds or savings accounts have been reported ; 




L. L. Elliott 

President, Columbia Trust Co. 

dividends, with very few exceptions, have been up 
to standard in amount and have been paid with 
satisfying promptness. The effect of the payment 
of so large a sum in cash has probably been no 
greater this year than in years past. There is, how- 
ever, this difference, the public is giving -far more 
attention than it usually does to financial matters 
and is scrutinizing with greater interest the happen- 
ings which affect the financial situation as a whole. 
Dividend day has always been an important event 
and the releasing of interest and dividend moneys 
is counted upon as a matter of course in the year's 
business. A large part of the money received has 
been absorbed this year, as it is every year, in the 
liquidation of obligations ; in other words, put into 
circulation by payment of debts. Liquidations have 
been unusually brisk since the first of the year, and 
the assuming of new obligations has been corre- 
spondingly slow. Probably a larger proportion 
than usual of January dividends will remain intact 
this year owing to the fact that money received 
by persons not having debts to pay, is not being 
so readily invested as is usually the case, but is be- 



The Biggest Stride in Railroad 
Operation Since the Advent of 
the Westinghouse Air Brake. 



THE SIMMEN AUTOMATIC RAILWAY SYS r 
TEM REVOLUTIONIZES EVERY MODERN 
METHOD AND RENDERS WRECKS AND 
COLLISIONS IMIPOSSIBLE. 

A block of 38 miles is now being equipped witb the 
Simmen System by one of the great trans-conti- 
nental roads in Southern California. By a simple 
system of wires communicating with an automatic 
recorder in the dispatcher's office, every train on the 
entire block is under the eye of the dispatcher every 
instant of the day and night. The record sheet 
shows the exact location of each train and its rate of 
speed. It automatically warns, not only the dis- 
patcher at his desk but the engineer in his cab of 
any danger in the track or on the road ahead. A 
misplaced switch, an engine or train running with- 
out orders or any one of the many dangers that 
beset a moving train are immediately communicated 
to the dispatcher and the engineer. By a simple 
device the dispatcher may flash a red light before 
the eyes of the engineer in his cab a hundred miles 
away, or should the exigencies of the case require 
it, may apply the air and stop the train without the 
aid or assistance of the engineer at all. 

AS FAR BEYOND THE TRAIN-ORDER AND 
BLOCK SYSTEM OF TODAY AS WAS THE 
MARCONI WIRELESS BEYOND THE ORDI- 
NARY TELEGRAPH OR THE EDISON TELE- 
PHONE BEYOND THE COMMON SPEAKING 
TUBE. PRACTICAL AND ECONOMICAL. 

Costing only $300 per mile to install as against 
$2000, the cost of the present inefficient system. 
Costing only $90 per mile per year to maintain as 
against $525, the present cost of maintenance. The 
company has ample means for all present necessities, 
but the demand for instruments following the pres- 
ent demonstration must be met with larger facilities. 

It Represents an Investment Opportunity Ap 
pealing to Those Who Realize the Vast Pro- 
fits to Original Shareholders in an Industry 
of World Wide Importance. A Very Small 
Block of the Stock is Offered to Enable the 
Company to Extend Its Shop Facilities at 
Los Angeles. No More of the Stock Will be 
Sold at Any Price and as the Need is Press- 
ing NOW, it Never Will be Offered Again. 

It is the Opportunity of Today and Must be Grasped 
Today 



Cut Out and Mail This For Book 

Simmen Automatic Railway Signal Co. 

933-934 Security Bldg., Los Angeles, Cal. 
Please furnish me without cost, your book, 
"The Story of a Great Invention". 



Name . . 
Address 



Pacific Outlook 



13 



..ait more favorable conditions, or lo 

.ti' ns maturing at a later date 

which ordinaril) would be allowed in take care 

- in the ordinary course i i business. 

s Ih-iii ii" tendency to withdraw divi 

for the purpose of hoarding, and 
the liquidation of debts has senl tin- mone) around 
tin- circle at a more lively rati-. 

paid, $299,655 was dividends i 
>f sixteen bank s'wl dend peri- 

fall on January first; $431,195 was dividends to 
holders of fifteen corporations reporting Jam; 
ary tir-t ; $503,350 was interest on bonds of thirteen 
public service corporations; and $587,750 was in- 
terest paid by savings banks to depositors. Inter- 
ind dividend payments are always an index to 
the settled business of a community, ami the Janu- 
ary first disbursements of this year were looked for- 
ward to with great interest. The prompt and full 
payment in the usual course of business has un- 
doubtedly had its effect psychologically as well as 
materially. 

In addition to the payments of interest and divi- 
dends by coi] orations, a vast amount of interest 
on loans fell due January first; all street improve- 
ment bonds and hundreds of mortgage loans have 
interest payments due at that date. The record.; 
of the City Treasurer's office where street improve- 
ment bonds are payable, and the reports of banks, 
building and loan associations and private loan 
brokers, show very little variation from the ordi- 
nary January first payments. All of these pay- 
ments are also finding their way into active circu- 
lation in the payment of debts, new investments 
and the ordinary conduct of business. 

Bank clearings for the week ending January 9 
show an increase of approximately two millions 
over the last week of the old year. A strong de- 
mand for general liquidation of obligations all 
along the line is felt, and January dividends Inn e 
been a decided factor in the movement. 
* * * 
A Way of the English 

Under the head of "Bernard Shaw vs. the United 
States", the Newsletter publishes the following 
sensible comment : 

It is not easy to understand why any American 
magazine should have given space to the wild tirade 
by Bernard Shaw against America and the Ameri- 
cans which appears in the December Everybody's. 
There was a time, years ago, when Dickens wrote 
his American Xotes, that the people of this country 
were sensitive to what their supposed "kin across 
the sea" thought of them, and to the dyspeptic utter- 
ances of some European of more or less genius, but 
that time has long passed. Because America has 
not gone wild over all the filth which Shaw has 
written, he has unbosomed himself of a screed 
which at once exposes his venom and his ignorance 
of America. But just why it should occupy air- 
space in a self respecting magazine is a conundrum. 
Criticism is always acceptable, by sensible people, 
if reasonable and honestly given, but abuse is not 
criticism, nor wild tirades of any material or in- 
tellectual benefit. If Shaw does not like America 
and the Americans, so much the worse for Shaw. 
It is of no importance to any one on this side of the 
Atlantic and probably of no value to any one in 
England what he thinks about this country, and it 
is only flattering his vanity and giving- undue im- 
portance to his utterances to publish them. 



w Hellman, Pi C shli r 

J. A. Graves, Vi. . -i- , Hel nn 

1 \ Van N ; 

T. E. Newlln. \ P i Cashier 

Ube 

dfaumers anb Merchants 

"Rational Bank 

Of I., i- \ngeles, Cal 

S W Cum i I : -Mi mm I t.l in iillCU,! 



Largest Capital and Surplus 
Oldest Bank in Southern California 

Capital Paid Up $1,500,000.00 

Surplus and Profits 1,737,552.6! 

United States and other first-class bonds 3,242,966.15 

Cash on Hand $3,715,442-55 

Due from Banks 1,363,011.93 5,078,454.48 

Special Safe Deposit ^Department and Storage Vaults 

Letters of Credit Issued, Available in All Parts of 
the World 

Directors 

Tsaias W. Hellman H. 15 .Huntington J. A. Graves 

I. N. Van Nuys C. E. Thorn O. W. Childs 

I. W. Hellman. Jr. K. Colin Dr Walter Lindley 

Milo M. Potter C. A. Ducommun Win. Lacy 

J. Baruch D. A. Hamburger T. B. Newlin 

W. G. Kerckhoff H. W. O'Melveny 



L. C. Smith & Bros. Typewriter 



THE (908 
MODEL 

Illustrates the modern 
writing-machine car- 
ried nearer to the point 
of absolute perfection 
than any other type- 
writer in existence. 




CWriting ir* Sight) 



Some New Features 

Gardner Bali-Bearing Typebar Joint. — You know 
the superiority of a ball-bearing over the common 
friction bearing. Our typeibar bearings are made of 
steel as hard and as smooth as glass. Run perfectly 
free, without play and without friction. 

Instantaneous Automatic Ribbon Reverse. — Works 
in the fraction of a second, without an ounce of rib- 
bon strain or any added key tension. The first sat- 
isfactory ribbon reversing device. 

The New Lightning Escapement for ease and 
speed and the new Silent Shift, with many other 
valuable new features, combine to produce the first 
example of a modern writing machine complete in 
every detail. 

Illustrated catalogue of New Models free. 

L. & M. ALEXANDER & CO. 

Exclusive Pacific Coast Dealers, 
528 South Spring St. Los Angeles, Cal. 



14 



Pacific Outlook 




By Lanier Bartlett 



Evening shades were falling. Already the multi- 
tudinous cats of Chinatown had begun to crouch 
and slip silently from view along dirty gutters and 
over rickety roofs, for with the brief twilight of 
this land came the fusilade of firecrackers that, for 
every Chinese true believer, ushered out the old 
year and saluted the new. Just then that immeasur- 
able chain of time that links the ancient empire of 
the East moved on another cog, and all subjects of 
the Son of Heaven, whether in the land of their an- 
cestors or abroad in the Occident, made ready at 
the- appointed time to cast in their mite to placate 
the gods that make the great chain draw taut 
through the ages. 

Aged, shriveled but keen-eyed San Toy, public 
scribe, writer of New Year cards, squatted on his 
heels near the curb beside his little stand burdened 
with ink pots, brushes and slips of red paper. To 
the right of him, left of him and behind him wrig- 
gled the tortuous alleys, the orderless arteries of his 
mysterious region. In front of him, as he squatted, 
coursed the borad thoroughfare of the modern 
world — the street where steel rails glimmered un- 
der the uncertain lights and trains clanged and 
rumbled incongruously athwart this stray pool of 
stagnant Orientalism. San Toy, whose grizzled 
head, from the rear of which hung a scrawny queue 
pieced out with black silk, was surmounted by a 
stiff, round silk cap with a red button in its crown. 
He had descended from the dignity of his stool 
against the wall to unbend his claw-like fingers 
over a rude brazier — an old kerosene can, half cut 
down and filled with coals. It was a pleasant-aired, 
starlit night of a Southern California February that 
was spreading overhead after a brilliantly sunlit 
day, but San Toy had grown pitifully thin under the 
weight of years, and persistent cold had long lodg- 
ed with the scant marrow in his bones. 

The crossing-bell opposite the bent figure began 
to clamor. A northbound passenger train rumbled 
clown the world's highway that cuts this Chinatown 
in two. San Toy raised his weazen face, readjusted 
his tortoise shell spectacles, and scanned the lighted 
cars inquisitively as they passed. 

"Look, there goes little Sing Sang. It is the last 
of her," he mused, as if to himself. 

Clear-cut in the window of one of the coaches the 
face — a pretty face — of a young Chinese woman 
flitted by. Beside her sat a fat, surly-looking China- 
man. 

"And there goes Sam." 

Again it was the cracked voice of the ancient 
scribe, who was smiling quizzically after the re- 
treating figure of a neat looking Chinese youth in 
American dress, who had just pushed breathlessly 
past San Toy's writing stand and was hurrying in 
the direction of the vanishing train. 

What did the shriveled squatter hugging the fad- 
ing coals know about the girl with the cast-down 
eyes, whose face had just flitted away, and the 
youth, who had just rushed madly toward it? Was 
this passing of a daughter and a son of Chinattown. 
the one with a prosperous looking stranger, the 



other alone, another of those unexploited tragedies 
of this reeking region — tragedies that are merely 
the commonplace to the denizens of these depths? 

Go ask San Toy, if you are fortunate enough to 
have his confidence. For shivering San Toy 
knows everything. How could it be otherwise 
with one whose business it is to transfer secrets 
from one mind to another, silently? 

He has resumed his dignified seat on the stool 
now, and is busy with brush, inkpot and slips of 
red paper, filling the order of a customer who stands 
by his elbow. Another ancient, skinny, scant-mar- 
rowed Celestial, a vender of Oriental sweets, has 
usurped the crude brazier just deserted by the 
scribe. His weird cry, as he proclaims his wares, 
shoots from his sunken cheeks at intervals, the 
while he' toasts his talons. 

The customer satisfied, San Toy turns his face 
away from you, who question him, and scans the 
busy alleyways, as if carefully sorting in his mind 
the many secrets stored there, that the right one 
may be chosen, and judiciously revealed. 

Mingled with the intermittent roar of tens of 
thousands of firecrackers the thumping of tom- 
toms, the crash of cymbals, the wail of heathen 
orchestras and the chatter of Asiatics comes down 
the alley over the heads of the picturesque throng. 
The narrow streets are briliant with magnificent 
Oriental lanterns — the gayest, most wantonly beau- 
tiful of all night decorations. These that are hung 
for the New Year are huge, balloon-like ; some of 
them of thin white silk, richly embroidered ; others 
gaudy, dragon-painted. They flaunt from the front 
of every shop, from the flower-massed balconies of 
queer restaurants, from the faces of the two Joss 
houses. 

Inside and out the hodge-podge region is won- 
drous busy — outside, marketing to lay up proven- 
der against the coming two days when nothing is 
supposed to be salable; inside, decorating altars, 
lighting punks and squaring the old year's ac- 
counts. Fruit, trinket and confection venders ars 
established along the curbs. Eager groups crowd 
about sellers of imported sugar cane, who hack off 
the various measures of cane with ugly knives. 
Coolies bearing between them on a pole quaint, 
straw-covered chests of holiday goods just arrived 
from over seas trot down the narrow sidewalks. 
And everywhere are the sacred lilies of China— -on 
the altars, in the shop windows, for sale on the 
streets. For, strangely, there is a dainty touch of 
flowers running through the sordid life of this 
Chinatown the year round — the brilliant geraniums 
in their boxes overhead all the time, the proud 
chrysanthemums nodding from their balconies in 
what, in other lands, is called the Fall, .and the 
tender lilies lifting their pale, pure faces in temple 
and den during the festive season. They are han- 
dled so tenderly by the tenderless, these blossoms, 
and the little faces look so immaculate in the midst 
of the forbidding surroundings! It is a strange, a 
fathomless place, is Chinatown. Of this unbeliev- 
able influence of flowers mysterious San Toy will 



Pacific Outlook 



15 



hint in a monent, when he lias observed the scene 
to his heart's content. 

And what does San Toy, hearer of everything, 
teller of nothing, save most judiciously, to the . 
few who have his confidence, say of the unhera 
plain little tragedy — of the Hitting ! 
It is nothing but the common place to San Toy's 
kind; yet San Toy himself — though he scorns the 
thought — is unmistakably sentiment-tainted. 

Well, pretty Sins; Sang — poor little girl, never 
•i will she lie seen in broad daylight — was ;1 
native daughter of the Golden West. Since her 
beginning she had lived and moved ami had her 
being under the smiling blue skies of California. 
True, the purity of these skies was often obscured 
from the dirty alleys that writhed through her 
town, and often the sunshine was shadowed from 
her soul: but the air of the free West was her air. 
just the same, and courageously she resolved never 
[ denizen of a den. 

( hi her father's balcony she had a can-and-box 
garden of her own. that waved larger and gayer 
flowers '.'nan any other in the region. There such 
chrysanthemums bloomed in the Fall as bloom in 
no other Chinatown outside of the rightful land of 
the Sons and Daughters of Heaven. For a season, 
the chrysanthemums, pure white; for the rest of 
the time geraniums, all scarlet. This, suggested 
ancient San Tov (and here he hinted of the influ- 
ence of flowers) was the crossed sign of Sang 
Sang's life — first pure white, and then sin-red. But 
that was just one of San Toy's ideas: once he 
joined a mission school class where he first gath- 
ered the suggestion that there could be either sin 
or good in a woman's life. However, the red did 
cross the white of Sing Sang's soul-garden that 
New Year's night, though the red was not of her 
planting, as you shall see. 

From the first Sing Sang played in the dust or 
the mud of the alleys, as the season might be, with 
other little Chinese girls and also boys in a man- 
ner quite prohibited in real China to daughters of 
such respectable father as her's — Hu Hong, the rich 
merchant. Here she was allowed to grow in free- 
dom awhile before she was bound hand and soul 
to the life sapping custom of an ancient race. 

But the girl grew into the first age of woman- 
hood and her father took her out of the juveniie 
flock where she had been allowed to gambol at 
pasture in prospect of her future value; and from 
the fresh air he banished her to an upstairs place, 
where he dressed her in purple and fine silks. For 
I hi Hono- could afford to, and be was wise after the 
peculiar fashion of his kind. Sing Sang had became 
salable. 

Sam Lung, a handsome young Chinese, Califor- 
nia horn, who wears American clothes and works in 
a rich family's kitchen in the white people's city, 
used to play with Sing Sang in the alleys. Playing, 
he learned to love. He did not know it at the time. 
but when he grew older and learned the word in 
the mission school, he realized it. Here also, he 
learned to disbelieve in the Chinese way with wo- 
men, and when he returned to Sing Sang's alley, a 
man, following his heart, he strove to woo and 
acquire her in manly, honest, clean American 
fashion. 

At first portly Hu Hong only laughed at Sam 
Lune, the honest kitchen boy. But later came the 
purple and fine silks: the banishment of Sing Sane., 
the lily white, to the "exhibition" booth in the rick- 



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lo 



Pacific Outlook 



ety upper story, and the exclusion of Sam from the 
avaricious merchant's house. 

Sam was poor; his love was all he had to offer 
for Sing Sang. Such goods count for nothing down 
there. An oily, puffed-up Chinese chanced down 
from Frisco. He had more than love to offer for 
the life of a woman — he had money. The father 
entertained him sumptuously with chicken noodles 
a ia won-hon, op-hoi and min-chop-soi, gin, pickled 
reptiles and women. He admitted the visitor to the 
upstairs place. The visitor was pleased, and show- 
ed his money. 

Sing Sang realized her impending fate. The oily, 
puffed-up individual relished the hospitality of this 
more southern "Little Cathay," and deferred his de- 
parture for several days. Sing Sang plead with 
her father to allow her to frequent her flower bal- 
cony in the days of grace that remained, that she 
might minister until the last to her beloved flowers 
— especially the white ones, that were withering. 
He granted her heart's desire. 



his stove in the American city to whistle Sing Sang 
from her skyward garden. 

As he whistled for his caged bird, all aglow that 
she was soon to be his, that bell began to clamor 
at the crossing and the northbound train rumbled 
through Chinatown. 

The honest kitchen boy, who had sought to fol- 
low a different way with women, understood in a 
flash the message of the deserted balcony and the 
strident bell. Sing Sang had gone to the doom of 
her kind. 

It was then that , San Toy, the ancient scribe, 
who seems never to look at any one thing, but who 
sees everything, pointed one finger to the sad pro- 
file in the car window, and another finger to Sam, 
who, rushing form the alley, reached the thorough- 
fare of the other, the modern would just in time 
to see the mocking tail-lightts of the train that bore 
the master and the slave wink away into the New 
Year's nia'ht. 



Decrepit San Toy, seeming to doze behind his 
little table by the curb, understood a signal that 
fluttered from the balcony where the last of the im- 
maculate chrysanthemums were a-blow — the last 
of them', fading before the predominant scarlet of 
the quenchless geraniums. Quietly, without a glim- 
mer of recognition, he stowed his paraphernalia m 
a near-by shop and wended his way, painfully, 
shakily, the whole distance on his failing, little-used 
legs, to the kitchen door of the mansion on the 
other side of the white people's city, and summoned 
Sam. He told Sam nothing, he committed himself 
to nothing, he uttered not a sound. San Toy was 
a perfectly judicious scribe. He simply summoned 
Sam by holding up one bony finger for an instant 
outside the screen door of the rear porch ; and Sam 
blessed him, and rushed through his dishes that 
evening. 

Before the night was late, Sam slipped into the 
shadow of the balcony where the chrysanthemums 
were fading'. Under cover of the din from a wheezy 
orchestra that was plaj'ing in her father's house for 
the edification of the visitor from the north, he 
talked up to her, and she down to him. Sam's heart 
wns not afraid, and he pledged Sing Sang to flv with 
him in the confusion of .the New Year's night — 
which was the next — into some other country; 
somewhere, anywhere, to the mythical place where 
love is neither bought nor sold. With a rope which 
Sam, the honest kitchen boy, would provide, Sing 
Sang, the oure at heart, who was caged for a loth- 
some sacrifice, would slip from the low., balcony 
through this very shadow that now hid the lover. 
The heart of the peach-blow maiden fluttered, and 
was gl^d. 

Hut Hu Hone hungered for the price, and hasten- 
ed the trade. Before day broke in upon that same 
night, Sing Sang was sold into vilest slavery; and 
the fat purchaser announced that he would go north 
with his new property on the evening train, which 
left just before the break of the New Year. 



Just in the w.oka of the brief, tremulous southern 
twilight, as the dark began to creep through the 
alleys and the lighted punks that keep the devils 
aloof were being set in their wall niches or stuck 
in the curb mud to glisten elfishly in the puddles 
of new fallen rain, Sam Lung hastened down from 



Such was the story that San Toy hinted at, in 
most judicious phrases; San Toy, the reader of 
English, the sentiment-tainted, as he bestrode, with 
the dignity that becomes a scribe, his curbstone 
stool. Yet, probably even San. Toy did not know 
it was a tragedy; for tragedies are not recognized 
as such in Chinatown. 



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829 South Hope Street Home Phone F 6 J 9 1 



Pacific Outlook 



17 




Rather a l>;ul joke, thai on the literati of Los An- 
s, perpetrated by the young woman who suc- 
ceeded in passing herself off as the author of "The 
Lady of the Decoration," one of the season's "seven 
best sellers," an imposture carried out so success- 
fully a> to cause one of the must exclusive little 
dinner chilis to invite her tn attend one of their 
gatherings. 

Since the telltale telegram last week from the 
publishers of the book to .me of the members of 
the VVomans' Press Club verifying the suspicions 
of the latter that Miss Caroline Rogefs, guest at the 
Lankershim, did not write the popular book, the 
young woman has not been seen or heard from. It 
is the supposition of a few friends who are willing 
to give her the benefit of every doubt, that she is 
rather the victim of some circumstance for which 
she is not responsible than that she deliberately in- 
tended to deceive. 

Her introduction into the "intellectuals" was 
through cards from the Sorosis Club of New York 
and other organizations of equally high standing, 
credentials good enough to admit a woman to the. 
best chilis in any American city. Her presence 
was of the best and those who conversed with her 
said she showed an uncommonly brilliant mind with 
a grasp of sociological matters that evidenced deep 
study. "A fever from which she suffered in India 
might have left her with the hallucination of au- 
thorship." said one kind-hearted clubwoman, who re- 
fuses to think ill of the mvsterious Miss Rogers. 



Last Saturday Peje Storck received at his South 
Hope Street home in honor of Miss Adela Verne, 
the English pianist. Miss Verne favored those 
present by playing the Bach-Liszt prelude and 
fugue, Alkan's "The Wind," a Beethoven Rondo, an 
Elkus Barcarolle, the Liszt "Ave Maria" and the 
Second Rhapsody. These friends assisted Mr. 
Storck in entertaining: Count W'achmeister, Messrs. 
Stanley Josling of London, Pandia Ralli, Jack Rubie, 
Xeil Brown, Gregory Perkins, Jr., Boris de Lon- 
donier and Dr. John Radenbaugh. Among those 
present were Mrs. Cornelius Cole, Mrs. John P. 
Jones, Mr. and Mrs. Roy Jones, Mr. and Mrs. Rob- 
ert Farquhar, Mr. and Airs. Randolph H. Miner, 
Mr. and Mrs. Hancock Banning, Mr. and Airs. Hec- 
tor Alliot, Air. and Mrs. Sterling Calder, Air. and 
Mrs. Harley Hamilton. Air. and Airs. Arnold Kraus, 
Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Jahn.'AImes. Emma Cole Brown. 
( leorge J. Denis, Seymour Locke, Ella Wheeler 
Wilcox-, George Drake Ruddy, David McCan, Cor- 
nelia Goodwin, W. H. Jamison, R. B. Baumgardt, 
Arthur Letts, Philip Kitchin, Hana Robinson. Lil- 
lian C. Rand, John W. Mitchell. Ernest Quinan, D. 
M. Riordan. Alary Schallert, Mary Morse, W. Cur- 
tis \ allele. Voigt, George J. Birkel, Jennie T. Kemp- 
ton, Alary Barstow, Robert Wankowski, Misses 
Georgina Jones. Elizabeth Jordan, Blanche Ruby. 
Edna Foy, Estelle C. Heartt, Dorothy Parry-Jones, 
Alice Coleman, Jennie Winston. Mary L. O'Don- 
oughue, Laura Smith. Angela Shipman. Margaret 



Goetz, Fannie Dillon. Gertrude Cohen, May Wil- 
son. Florence .Marx. Evelyn Hamburger, Jeffna 
Robinson, Brocklebank, .Messrs. La Hale, Leslie 
Marsh. Archibald Sessions. Robert Rentlinger and 
Komarowski. 



Artists, musicians, players and writers to the 
number of fifty were the guests of Mr. and Airs. 
George Drake Ruddy last Sunday when they gave 
a tea in honor of Airs. Gertrude' Nelson Andrews, 
author of "Kate Shannon," and Airs. Ella Wheeler 
Wilcox, poet and playright. The occasion was 
made very pleasant by an informal programme of 
music contributed by some of the guests and the 




Miss Florence 1'ortkr 

Daughter of Mr?. Florence Collins Porter, whose engagement was 
announced a few days ago 

Photo by Marceau 

reading of Airs. AYilcox's new playlet, "Art versus 
Cupid," by Airs. William Desmond. Mrs. Lillian 
C. Rand sang several songs in a delightfully fin- 
ished manner and Aliss Fanny Dillon played one of 
her own compositions. Count Wachineister was 
also heard in several piano selections. 

Airs. Ruddy was assisted in receiving by the 
Misses Ethel Wilcox, Mabel Ruddy, Marion Shinn, 
Fanny Dillon, Tosephine Eachus and Mrs. Giles 
Dow. 



Women interested in humanitarian work were 
the guests of Aliss Helen Matthewson of the Her- 
shev Anns Tuesdav at a luncheon given in honor 
of Ella Wheeler Wilcox. Those present were 
Mire. Caroline Severance. Mme. Helena Modjeska, 



18 



Pacific Outlook 



Mrs. Florence Collins Porter, Mrs. Rufus L. Hor- 
ton, Mrs. Gertrude Nelson Andrews, Mrs. Elizabeth 
Deardorf, Mrs. Oscar Lawler, Mrs. O. E. Farrish, 
Mrs. Walter Brode, Mrs. Geo. Drake Ruddy, Miss 
Augusta Lamb and Miss Bennet of Pasadena. 

Mrs. Charles Wellington Rand .has come up 
from her Venice home and is domiciled at the Alex- 
andria, where she will remain until starting for the 
East in a few days to visit her son at Harvard. 
Thursday evening Mrs. Rand had as her guests at 
a box party at the Mason given in honor of Mrs. 
Ella Wheeler Wilcox, Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Drake 
Rudy, Col. Hamilton and 'Mr. Wilcox. 



Dr. and Mrs. J. C. McCoy entertained Thursday 
and Friday evenings at their home, 17 Barnard 
Park, in honor of their son and daughter-in-law, 
Mr. and Mrs. W. M. McCoy, who were recently 
married. Those assisting in receiving were Mr. and 
Mrs. William H. Barnard, uncle and aunt of the 
bride ; Miss Marie Carter and Mrs. Victor E. Shaw 
and the Misses Ethel and Alice Shaw of San Diego, 
Mrs. W. S. Bartlett, Mrs. Lanier Bartlett, Miss 
Mathilde F. Bartlett, Mrs. Matthew Robertson, Mrs. 
Frank E. Walsh, Miss Virginia Walsh and Mrs. C. 
Q. Stanton. 

The halls were canopied with asparagus phimosis, 
while the reception room was in white and blue. 
Violets, hyacinths and roses were used, banks of 
green ferns completing the color harmony. From 
each doorway swung a basket of carnations. Pink 
roses and carnations of the same tint were in the 
dining room and the library was in yellow. Punch 
was served on the porch, which was canvassed in 
and fern-lined! Mrs. McCoy wore a costume of 
white lace over lavender and the bride was in her 
wedding gown. Six hundred invitations were is- 
sued. 



The busiest person in Los Angeles last week was 
Mrs. Ella Wheeler Wilcox, in 1 whose honor a num- 
ber of affairs were given. Monday she was the 
guest of the Woman's Press Club ; Tuesday Miss 
Helen Matthewson gave a luncheon for her, after 
which she assisted in receiving at the reception for 
Mine. Caroline Severance at the Woman's Club 
house; Wednesday evening Mrs. Wilcox was in 
attendance at the reception in the Unity church, 
South Flower street, for the benefit of the Working 
Boys' Club, founded by Mrs. L. M. Vance, and 
Thursday night Mrs. Charles Wellington Rand 
gave a box party at the Mason in her honor. 



Mrs. William Morehouse, 754 South Bonnie Brae 
street, entertained the Card club of which she is a 
member, Tuesday afternoon. The guests were Mrs. 
B. R. Brown, Mrs. M. P. Snyder, Mrs. A. J. Copp, 
Mrs. Thos. Hughes, Mrs. W. T. Jeffries, Mrs. C. S. 
Kious, Mrs. C. H. Matthay, Mrs. D. A. Meekins, 
Mrs. O. Morgan, Mrs. J. Frederick Johnson, Mrs. 
G. W. Perkins, Mrs. S. W. Strong, Mrs. M. K. 
Suber, Mrs. C. W. Sylvester, Mrs. W. H. Wagner, 
Mrs. William E. Horn, Mrs. Goodin and Mrs. Pat- 
terson. 



A leap-year party was given Tuesday evening 
by Miss Grace Allen of the Burlington apartments 
to the S. M. Club, of which she is a member. One 
hundred invitations were issued* The club is com- 
posed of the following, who assisted in receiving: 



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Pacific Outlook 



19 



Mr-. K. B. Schroeter, Mr-. W. I. Wren, Mrs. fames 
re. Mrs. K. Arnold, Mrs. J. Purcell, Miss Lu- 
cile Dixon, Miss Lulu Page, Miss Ethel Graham, 
Miss Alma Bradley, Miss Florence Osborne, Miss 
Anna Kellam, Miss Grace Rockwell, Miss Lydia 
Kellam, Miss Margaret Seymour, Miss Nellie Bea- 
con, Miss Emmie Luentzel, Miss Violet McDonald, 
Mi>> tiara Allen, Miss Frances Maxson, Miss Helen 
McCutcheon, Mi-s Frances Wartelle, Mis- Alice 
Atwell, Miss Adelaide Stanton, Miss Carrie Stuts- 
man. Mis- Hortense Barnhart Jones, Miss (1. Van- 
dervoort and Mis- Grace Allen. 



Mrs. Man Holland Kinkaid, who lias been iden- 
tified with the Pacific Outlook as associate editor 
since the foundation of this publication, has recent- 
ly gone i" Mew York City, where, for some time, 
she will be engaged in literary work. Mrs. Kin- 
kaid had made her home in Los Angeles for several 
vears and had become recognized as one of the 




Mary Holland Kinkaid 

Photo by Hana Robison 

most accomplished writers on the Pacific Coast. A 
prominent publishing' house of New York has in 
press her lastest novel, which deals with conditions 
in the Indian Territory, and will be put on the 
market within a few weeks. Mrs. Kinkaid will 
probablv return to California a few months hence 
and resume her successful literary labors on this 
coast. 



Miss Theresa Fraser, daughter of Air. and Mrs. 
C. A. Fraser, 716 Whittier Street, left Thursday for 
San Francisco, where she was married to Charles 
Francis Brady, formerly of Los Angeles, now of 
Albion, Mendocino County. The bride is a graduate 
of the local high school and Mr. Brady occupied a 




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20 



Pacific Outlook 



position of responsibility with the Pacific Electric 
Railway of Los Angeles, which he resigned to be- 
come general manager of the Albion Lumber Com- 
pany. 

Miss Bessie Beatt.y of 429 West Avenue Fifty- 
four left Wednesday for a two weeks' visit with 
friends in San Francisco. Since returning from 
Nevada a week before Christmas Miss Beatty has 
entertained and been entertained extensively. Her 
book, "Who's Who in Nevada," upon which she 
started to work last spring, has been out several 
weeks and has attracted a lot of favorable comment 
for its general excellence. 

Hollywood women have arranged to give a bene- 
fit entertainment for the Children's Hospital of Los 
Angeles Tuesday evening, Jan. 23, in Wilcox Hall, 
Hollywood. The patronesses are Mrs. W. R. Black- 
burn, Mrs. Paul Compton, Mrs. Leonard Durant, 
Mrs. A. B. Barret, Mrs. Charles J. George, Mrs. R. 
P. Mcjohnston, Mrs. C. H. Lippincott and Mrs. G. 
C. Vail Nest. 

La Jeunesse Club members gave a dancing party 
at Kramer's Friday night. Mesdames E. R. Frost, 
Andrew Glassell, D. C. Lane and A. L. McAuley 
were the patronesses, and the committee having 
charge of the arrangements was composed of 
Messrs. Thomas Duque, Joe Lane, Calvin McAuley 
and Robert A. Manuel. 

Mrs. W. H. Mohr of 4307 Marmion Way will 
give a reception Wednesday, Jan. 22, in honor of 
two of the season's brides, Mrs. Preston McKinney, 
daughter of the hostess, and Mrs. Ralph Larson, 
who was Miss Mabel Crossman, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. L. C. Crossman of Glen Albyn Way. Mrs. 
Crossman will assist in receiving. 

Miss Lalla Fagge will be the guest of honor at 
a musicale to be given next Wednesday evening by 
Mrs. F. W. Noonan of Fort Hill Villa, North Broad- 
way. The invitations were for the preceding even- 
ing, but on account of the Ellis Club concert, which 
takes place that evening, the date was changed. 

Miss Maud Johnson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
G. Rupert Johnson, 801 Edgware Road, and Charles 
Gardner were married Wednesday afternoon at the 
home of the bride's parents, Rev. J. Harden Best 
officiating, assisted by Rev. A. S. Phelps. Only the 
family and a few friends witnessed the ceremon)^ 

Miss Bertha Corbett was the guest of honor at 
a luncheon given Wednesday by Miss Georgina S. 
Townsend of "Fay Villa," Hollywood. The other 
guests were Mrs. R. H. Jackson of Long Beach, 
Mrs. Ruth Parcher, Miss Estelle Heartt, Miss Anna 
Kavanaugh, Miss Jean Wakeman and Miss Leonard. 

Miss Imogene Lyall and Joseph Saunders, Jr., 
were married Tuesday evening at the Second Pres- 
byterian Church, Rev. Joseph Campton performing 
the ceremony. A reception followed the marriage 
service, after which Mr. and Mrs. Saunders left for 
an extended eastern trip. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles T. Reilly of 420 West Ave- 
nue Fifty-four gave a dinner last Sunday in honor 
of Mrs. Gertrude Nelson Andrews. Other guests 
were Mr. George D. Andrews, Mrs. Jane Beatty, 
Miss Bessie Beatty and Miss Frances Nelson of 
New York. 

Mrs. Richard V. Day and Miss Gretchen Day en- 
tertained Monday with a luncheon, followed by 





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Pacific Outlook 



21 



n honor of Mrs. ]. R. Powers and 
Mr-. R. D. Bronson, daughters of Mrs. Day. They 
will be at home again Monday to about sixtj of 
their friends. 

Mrs. Thomas Lee Woolwine, 1040 Kensington 
Road, will entertain with a luncheon and I >ri . 1 ^ <.• 
party next Friday in honor of Mr. Woolwine's sis- 
ter. Mrs. Elton A. Herrick, of-Grand Rapids, Mich.. 
w lii » is spending the winter here. 

Miss fmogene M. I. all. daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 

Joseph \V. Lyall, 'UJ Hinton street, was married 

to Joseph Saunders, Jr., Tuesday evening in the 

ml Presbyterian Church. Rev. R. J. Compton 

performed the ceremony. 

Miss Julia Witman, daughter of II. J. Witman, 
633 W est Eighteenth street, was married last Sat- 
urday afternoon at the family home to William Ed- 
ward Pelley of Rhyolite. Rev. William Horace Day 
performed the ceremony. 

At their annual banquet Tuesday evening the 

Ape Fraternity of Occidental College had as their 

-is the members of the Owl Fraternity. The 

affair was given at the home of John A. Merrill of 

Pasadena Avenue. 

Miss Louise Carr and Miss Katherine Carr of 
West Adams street, who recently returned from a 
.six weeks' European trip, have taken apartments 
for the winter at the "Crippen," on South Hope 
street 

Mr. and Mrs. F. O. Johnson and Mr. and Mrs. L. 
1 ). Sale are on a motoring trip through the country 
south of Los Angeles in the touring car belonging 
to Mr. Johnson. They are now at Coronado. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank L. Colby, 1815 Magnolia 
avenue, are entertaining the parents and sister of 
the latter, Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Todd and Mrs. 
Myra Thompson, of Lassen county. 

Mrs. Frances Shaler of the Van Nuys gave a 
luncheon and box part)' Saturday in honor of Miss 
Leila Holterhoff. Mrs. Holterhoff assisted in en- 
tertaining. 

Mrs. Lewis Clark Carlisle of 1202 South Alvarado 
street gave a five hundred party Friday afternoon 
and on Saturday afternoon entertained with bridge 
whist. 

Mrs. Edward Emerson McDowell and Mrs. J. 
Vosburg Peacock of Manhattan Place have as their 
guest Miss Beulah H. Boynton of Rochester, N. Y. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Germain entertained recent- 
ly in honor of the Misses Margaret and Agnes Og- 
den of Oakland and Miss Ehrenberg of Berkeley. 

Miss Marie Wagner. 1635 Ingraham street, left 
this week for a visit to her former home in Mem- 
phis, Tenn., and other places in the South. 

Miss Bessie B. Boehrner, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. August Boehrner, 1(>40 Reed Street, was mar- 
ried recently to Dr. Charles I'.. Stare. 

C. W . Riordan of Flagstaff. Ariz., and his two 
daughters, Miss Mary Riordan and Aliss Blanche 
Riordan, an- at the Angclus. 

Mrs. R. M. Galbraith, 811 South Burlington Ave- 
nue, will lie the hostess at the meeting of the \ . C. 
Club Tuesday afternoon. 







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22 



Pacific Outlook 



AMONG THE WOMEN'S CLUBS 



Reception for Mme. Severance 

There was a general outpouring of club women at 
the reception given by the Friday Morning Club 
Tuesday afternoon in honor of their president em- 
eritus, Mme. Caroline M. Severance, whose eighty- 
eighth birthday was passed last Sunday. Nearly 
one thousand came between the hours of three and 
five to pay their respects and express their good 
wishes to the woman who is known as the "mother 
of clubs." 

Mme. Severance organized the first woman's club 
iri America in Boston in 1868, in the face of general 
opposition of the conservative element of the com- 
munity. But she had the courage of her ideals and 
hers was the gratification of seeing the movement 
started by her grow until it spread over the whole 
country, with women's clubs in every city and town. 

Making her home in Los Angeles in the early 
seventies, Mme. Severance came to occupy the same 
position in the then small town that she had held 
in her own city — that of leader in every effort made 
for the betterment of womanhood. The small group 
of women, of which she was the center, became the 
organization known as the Friday Morning Club, 
making her their first president. 

A beautiful ceremony was introduced at the re- 
ception Tuesday, when eighty-eight of the oldest 
members of the club entered, marching two by two, 
each bearing a lighted candle and a slip of paper 
with a wish written on it, which was presented to 
the guest of honor as they passed before her. Then, 
marching to the center, they formed the figure 88. 
At this point another member entered bearing a 
single lighted candle, which she gave to Mme. Sev- 
erance, while the double circle of women on the 
floor snuffe dtheirs, and, joining hands, sang "Auld 
Lang Syne." 

Spencer Smith, one of the honorary members of 
the' club, presented Mme. Severance with a paint- 
ing by Carl Oscar Borg on behalf of some of the 
members. Mrs. Shelley Tolhurst, assisted by the 
past presidents and Mme. Helena Modjeska, were 
the hostesses of the afternoon. Tea was served in 
the parlors and the library. 

The eighty-eight who marched were Mmes. J, 
D. Hooker, H. B. Wing, Burton Williamson, Joseph 
F. Sartori, H. M. Kimball, Ralph Hagan, Jesse 
Waterman, C. C. Carpenter, J. E. Cowles, E. F. 
Covell, F. P. Clark, Telfair Creighton, F. E. Fay, 
E De Garmo, W. D. Babcock, F. J. Hart, Godfrey 
Holterhoff, J. O. Koepfli, E. G. Smead, H. R. Smith, 
Lucy Spencer, Shellev Tolhurst, Newell Mathews, 
J. W. Mitchell, George North, S. F. Judson, E. A. 
Warner, Minnie Seward, Frank Wiggins, C. E. 
English, E. L. Swaine, E. P. Hubbard, J. H. Abbott, 
W. D. Pridham, Kate Thorp, J. A. Osgood, W. A. 
Spalding, E. K. Foster, G. H. Wadkigh, F. A. 
Eastman, Dorothea Moore, M. R. Sinsabaugh, 
George Ordway, W. Gillelen, Anna S. Averill, B. C. 
Whiting, Juana Neil, Mary Bowman, W. C. Patter- 
son, C. N. Sterry, Mary Porter Haynes, T. W. 
Brown, Charles Monroe, A. M. Davidson, A. N. 
Davidson, Ross Kirkpatrick, R. J. Moore, J. S. 
Pierce, W. G. Kerckhoff, W. W. Murphy, T. C. Pax- 
ton, M. S. Strohn, J. Q. Tufts, J. S. Vallely, William 
Meade, Kate Hanby, Cornelius Cole, H. L. Story, 
C. L. Conger, Frank Gibson, M. L. Stevens, Lucy 
Snedaker, S. S. Salisbury, H. R. Boynton, Rebecca 



Spring, Walter Lindley, F. B. Frost, B. H. Cass, 
Elizabeth Follansbee and the Misses Elizabeth Ben- 
ton Fremont, Smead, Margaret Fette, Frances Wills, 
Caroline Seymour, J. E. Collier, Jessie Anthony and 
Madame Modjeska. 



Ruskin Art 

"Rembrandt and His Disciples" occupied the at- 
tention of the Ruskin Art members at their meet- 
ing Wednesday. • Mrs. S. B. McLenegan and Mrs. 
L. J. McQuade led the discussion, which was par- 
ticipated in by Mrs. F. H. Snowden, Mrs. J. F. 
Kanst, Mrs. W. J. Chambers, Mrs. J. E. Crandall 
and Mrs. Ella Hubbard. Rembrandt's method of 
work and use of dry point were explained and photo- 
graphic reproductions of his most famous works 
were shown. His disciples under consideration were 
Paul Potter (1625-1654), Jacob Ruysdael (1630- 
1681), Anthony Vandyck (1599-1641), Wenzal Hol- 
lar (1607-1677), Giovanni Piranesi (1721-1779). 
Miss Wadleigh reviewed current events. Next week 
etching in England, France, Holland and Norway 
will be discussed. 



Talent at Press Club 

A brighter array of gifted women than that at the 
Woman's Press Club luncheon at the Westminster 
Monday has not been seen in Los Angeles in many 
days. The long table, at which every seat was 
taken, fairly scintillated with talent. First there 
were the guests of honor, Mrs. Ella Wheeler Wil- 
cox, poet and playwright, and the venerable Mme. 
Caroline Severance, whose years of work for the 
advancement of women have won her an endear- 
ing and lasting fame; then there was Countess 
Wachtmeister, noted lecturer on philosophical, sub- 
jects, and Miss Mary E. Phillips of Boston and Miss 
Bertha Corbett, the "Sunbonnet Baby" artist, and 
several others, each distinguished in some line of 
literary or artistic endeavor. 

An impromptu symposium on "Fellowship Among 
Women'' followed the luncheon, and interesting lit- 
tle speeches were made by those who participated. 
Mrs. George A. Barry of Monrovia presided, and 
introduced as the first speaker Mme. Severance, and 
all rose as a mark of respect to the revered woman. 
In a strong, clear voice Mme. Severance briefly re- 
viewed the history of the women's movement dur- 
ing her time, closing with a tribute to the women of 
today who show in their lives the spirit of fellow- 
ship. 

Mrs. Gertrude Nelson Andrews, the playwright, 
whose latest work, "Kate Shannon," was produced 
last week at the Auditorium, emphasized the im- 
portance of the mother love in all the works of life. 
Mrs. Wilcox was diffident about speaking, confess- 
ing to a lack of physical courage when she was on 
her feet, but she did talk and was listend to eagerly 
while she told how "Maurine," her poem, which 
Mrs. George Drake Ruddy had just read, came to 
be written. She expressed a feeling of gratitude 
that the class of facetious women newspaper writers 
was passing- and that they were being succeeded by 
those who held themselves and their work in too 
high a regard to use their talents for anything but 
the most dignified effort. 

Not the least interesting among the speakers was 
Senorita Maria Simoni Castalvi of Guadalajara, 
Mexico, who is a guest at the home of Mr. and Mrs. 
John W. Mitchell. The senorita spoke in Spanish 



Pacific Outlook 



23 



of her interest in the methods of teaching music in 
the public schools of America, a subject she has 

g while here to perfect herself in I 
lish. Mr.-. Mitchell made one of her characteristic 
ally witty speeches that sent ripples of laughter 
nd the table. Others who spoke were Miss 
Phillips, Mrs. Mary W. Bowman, Mrs. Corella 
Phipps, Mrs. L. S. Ramage, of Palo Alto, Mi»s fean 
Durell of Chicago, Miss Grace Tower and Mrs. Eu- 
nice Nixon Ho;, kin-. At Miss rower's suggestion 
a silent toast was drunk to Mrs. Mary Holland Kin- 
kaid. who left recently for the East. The next lunch- 
eon will be held at Hotel Green, Pasadena, the sec- 
ond Monday in February. 



Ebell Club 
Miss Josephine C. Locke lectured before the Ebell 
Monday on "Architecture an Expression of Race 

Consciousness." Tuesday the music section gave a 
luncheon after the session. "German Composers 
from Bach to Beethoven" was the subject dis- 
cussed. The regular m inthly luncheon of the travel 
section was given Thursday. 

"Current Topics." conducted by Mrs. Frank A. 
Kelly, will be the programme for next Monday. The 
speakers will be Mrs. Robert J. Burdette, who will 
talk about home affairs; Mrs. \Y. S. Bartlett, who 
will present foreign affairs, and Mrs. Eliza Tupper 
Wilkes, who will review the new books. 



Friday Morning 

Harlev Hamilton, organizer and director of the 
I, os Angeles Symphony orchestra, addressed the 
Friday Morning Club this week on the subject, "The 
Orchestra." Mr. Hamilton told of the composition 
of the orchestra, naming the instruments and their 
parts, and describing their tone qualities. Follow- 
ing the history of the orchestra, the speaker passed 
on to the evolution of the symphony, defining it and 
telling how this form of orchestra composition 
should be studied and how one should listen to it. 

A book review will be given at next week's meet- 
ing, when a number of the recent books will be 
analyzed. 



Third Annual Show 



Mrs. Baruch Honored 

Mrs. Bertha Hirsch Baruch, well known for her 
contributions to modern philosophic thought, pa- 
pers from her pen having appeared from time to 
time in the standard magazines, has been signally 
honored by the league of American Pen Women, of 
Washington, D. C, having been invited to speak 
before that body at their next annual meeting. She 
has taken as her theme, "Notoriety and Fame." 
Mrs. Baruch is a member of the College Women's 
Club, The Women's Press Club of Southern Cali- 
fornia, and the Temple Literary Union. In Febru- 
ary she will address the Academy of Science on the 
subject, "The Scientific Basis of Conscience." 
* * * 
"S>6e Noise in tHe Room" 

The dear little, queer little noise that yon hear 
When you lie down to sleep in the twilight, my dear. 
Is llie nuaint little, faint little step of the dream 
As she climb.-, to your bed on the silver moonbeam! 

The gay little, fay little shadow you see 
When first you look up in the morning to me. 
Is the sweet little, fleet little dream on her wax 
To her home in the clouds for the rest of the da_J ! 

— From the poems of Folger McKinsey. 




CHUTES PARK 
January 23, 24, 25 and 26 

The largest show ever held west of Chicago. Mem- 
bers of other clubs are invited to exhibit in this 
show. A large number of valuable silver cups as 
well as solid bronze medals will be won by the best 
cats in the different classes. Very best meats, both 
raw and cooked, will be furnished by the club, ami 
special dishes prepared foi the most fastidious pets. 

ADMISSION 25 CENTS 

Entry fee: Cats 50c; Kittens 25c. 

Ring up the Secretary, Mrs. W. L. Wolfe, E 1066. 




S>6e True OsteopatK 

is the true 

PHYSICIAN 

He must be fitted to do the best thing possible under 
every conceivable circumstance of human suffering. 

The Pacific College of Osteopathy 

Will teach you the science of the true Osteopath. 

Next term begin? January 28. Officers: J. O. Hunt, 
Pres. ; Stanley M. Hunter, Vice-Pres.: W. J. Cook, 
See., and C. A. Whiting, Chairman of the Faculty. 
Address the secretary for full information. Cor. Daly 

Street and Mission Road, Los Angeles, Cal. 



24 



Pacific Outlook 



UNDER THE SKYLIGHTS 



By Perez Field 
John H. Rich is showing in Pasadena thirty-two 
of his oil paintings. They are hung in the studio of 
Edward Greene on Colorado • Street, opposite the 
Hotel Maryland, and may be seen there until the 
twenty-fifth of this month. These pictures have, 
some of them, been exhibited at the Boston Art 
Club, the Philadelphia Academy and elsewhere. Mr. 
Rich was awarded the Paige traveling scholarship 
by the Boston Art Museum. He remained abroad 
*wo years, being part of the time in Paris, in a 
studio on Rue Notre Dame des Champs, near the 
Students' Club, and part of the time at Moret, that 
quaint old town near Fontainbleau, which has at- 
tracted so many artists, among whom was Miss 
Duval of this city. Mr. Rich returned to America 
in July and has been in Los Angeles about two 
months. He is teaching at the School of Art and 
Design two days each week, the remainder of his 
time being devoted to sketching among our hills, 
the spirit of which he seems already to have caught 
and to have successfully impressed on his canvas. 

The pictures cover a variety of subjects, land- 
scape, figures and still life. Most of the landscapes 
are taken from sketches of Eastern and European 
scenes, although there are several tentative studies 
of California coloring. The views of Moret are in- 
teresting. "Court Yard, Moret," is a sunny bit of 
that old town, perhaps one of the happiest of his 
outdoor effects. Moret is a walled town, near the 
forest and on the Loing, a tributary of the River 
Seine. It is in the neighborhood of this place where 
grapes are hung in cellars, each cluster in a glass 
jar, to preserve them into the winter, and even into 
the spring, when the peasants get large prices for 
them. This practice might prove profitable here. 
No. 29 "Moret" is a study of the old walls of the 
city and shows an old gate through which the 
crusaders passed. The town was frequented by 
royalty in passed centuries, and the famous Maison 
de Francois Ire at Paris was transported from this 
place. Another attractive sketch of Moret is "The 
Dam," where some sunlit roofs appear above the 
shaded woodwork of this old water barrier. Mr. 
Rich's figures are even better than his landscapes. 

"Peasant Woman, Moret," is a study of an in- 
terior, which is reserved in color and well com- 
posed. This picture shows how capable this artist 
is of a sympathetic feeling. "The 'Cello" is a well 
conceived picture, both in color and drawing. It 
represents a boy practicing in a large room, lumi- 
nous with summer light. The room, it appears, is 
an abandoned church somewhere in New England, 
which Mr. Rich and a friend used for a studio one 
summer. The old pews they used to kindle fires 
with, a practice which a New England conscience 
of the traditional sort might find ominous and pro- 
phetic. Mr. Rich, however, remains unconcernedly 
cheerful, and perhaps wisely thinks that any sacri- 
fice is worthy of such good work as his. "Studio 
Arrangement" is a small piece good in color. "A 
Cup of Tea" is a young woman scanning the future 
in the tea leaves. There are several paintings of 
this sort in the collection, wherein Mr. Rich shows 
his ability to treat the human figure successfully, 
striking the happy medium between the work of 
the impressionist and that of the man of over- 
wrought detail. The pose of this figure is easy and 
demonstrates the artist's possibilities as a portrait 



painter, work of which kind he hopes to do this 
winter. A man of Mr. Rich's training and experi- 
ence is an important accession to the art life of the 
city, where we hope he may remain for many moons. 

At the Ebell Club Monday afternoon last Miss 
Josephine E. Locke of Hollywood, formerly so well 
known in Chicago for her work in the art depart- 
ment of the public schools, gave a lecture on "Archi- 
tecture the Expression of Race Consciousness." 
Miss Locke handled the subject in an unique way, 
treating the art of building more from the vital side 
than from the more formal one of history or outline. 
She deftly characterized the inherent qualities of 
Egyptian, Greek and Gothic art and from an in- 
tuitive insight, brought about by personal experi- 
ence, showed her hearers how necessary it is to have 
feeling and emotion in presence of the great aes- 
thetic masterpieces of the world. Among other 
things she said : "Photographs have revolutionized 
the study of art. By their means the student may 
now get an almost direct appeal from the remotest 
object. Our interpretations, therefore, no longer 
come to us through the biased authority of books." 
She quoted Marion Crawford's saying that civiliza- 
tion follows thought. The immediate need of Amer- 
ica is an abstract ideal to beautify the commercial 
and utilitarian ones which predominate in our na- 
tional life toda)'. We build now no longer temples, 
but "Flat Iron" buildings and railway stations, to 
carry the message of our time to future archaeolo- 
gists. 

All art may be divided into the original and the 
traditional, the Egyptian, Chaldean, Greek and 
Gothic arts being original and all others, ours in- 
cluded, beirig' traditional. The traditional arts are 
the outcome of culture such as ours, wherein man's 
impulses even are academical and his vices are 
habits rather than demands for more life. All ma- 
terials are as wax that take the impression of a na- 
tion's feeling. 

Miss Locke has had a long and wide experience 
in beautiful things and has the rare will and will- 
ingness to interpret the meaning thereof. 



At the Blanchard Gallery this week is an exhibi- 
tion of paintings by Joseph Johnson Ray, who is 
well known as an illustrator, having worked for a 
long time for the Saturday Evening Post, as well as 
for Life. His health having failed, he came to the 
coast a few years ago and has been developing his 
talent for painting while here. In this collection of 
pictures are over forty canvases, all of which are 
the result of the last six months' work, a vast under- 
taking, which speaks well for Mr. Ray's industry. 
The subjects are chiefly landscapes and marines, the 
latter being scenes mostly of La Jolla. There are, 
besides, four portraits. Of these the portrait of Mr. 
Tryon is the most lifelike. The most attractive pic- 
ture in the room is a stud}' called "Sand Dunes." It 
is simple, and Mr. Ray has succeeded in putting 
more feeling into this picture than any of the oth- 
ers. 'Arroyo, Pasadena," is a promising bit of color, 
and the "The Road" shows that the artist has poetic 
feeling. Near this picture is another one called 
"Sand Dunes." a good study, but not. as full of charm 
as the first one mentioned. It is in these quieter 
subjects where Mr. Ray is seen at his best. In his 
more ambitious marines he is not so successful. 
Rocks and waves seem to require a deal of practice 
before they look natural. It is a pity that no illus- 



Pacific Outlook 



25 



trations arc hung, as probably by them one could 
judge of the temperament of this artist better. The 
transition stage between pencil and brush is a dif- 
ficult one and only such enthusiasm as Mr. Ray 
evidently feels for his work can make the change 
a successful one. Judging by these pictures, it would 
seem as if his best achievements would be along 
quiet lines. 

Ferdinand Burgdorff, a young artist of Cleve- 
land, Ohio, dropped into town this week from New 
Mexico, where he has been painting through the 
fall. He had a plump package of water colors under 
his arm, and among them are some that reflect the 
intensities of the New Mexico highlands with good 
effect. His Western work has been confined chiefly 
to Santa Fe and vicinity and the pueblo of Isleta. 
One of Mr. Burgdorff' s pictures, which has a pleas- 
antly familiar look to anyone who may have wan- 
dered among the pueblos of the Rio Grande, is a 
representation of the interior of Seis' store at Isleta. 
with the quaint Indian folk trading at the counter. 
This young Clevelander is another of the artists who 
have heard and yielded to the call of the Far West 
and his ambition is to campaign with his brush for 
some time to come among our deserts and moun- 
tains. After a brief visit to San Francisco he will 
return to Los Angeles. 



Art Briefs 

Miss Xona L. White, who has refrained from at- 
tempting to catch the peculiar coloring of these 
regions until she became familiar with their subtle 
hues, has lately been making some very successful 
sketches among the hills. They show the wisdom 
of patience and an intelligent discernment. 



(Serman^Hmerican 
Savings SSanh 



Will Occupy Its New Home at the Southeast 
Corner Spring and Fourth Streets 

ABOUT FEBRUARY FIRST 

Our new and commodious banking rooms will be 
open to our depositors and the general public abo.it 
the first of February. In our larger quarters wc 
will have facilities for adequately taking care of 
our large and constantly increasing business. 

Reservations for sale deposit boxes may be 
made now. Our Safe Deposit facilities will be un- 
surpassed in the West Tlie Vault contains 20.001 

boxes 



GERMAN AMERICAN 
AWINCS/^BANK 




Present Location 
223 SOUTH SPRING 



BRANCH— Main & First 



Columbia University has united with the Acad- 
emy of Design in forming a department of fine arts 
in the university. ECenyon Cox is to be professor 
of painting, Daniel C. French professor of sculpture 
and John Fa Farge professor of the decorative arts. 

.Miss Emily Rutherford has been taken ill and her 
studio will therefore be closed for the present. The 
friends of this capable wood carver will be glad to 
know that she hopes to be at work again before 
many weeks. 

Berthold Lauer, curator of anthropology at the 
Field Museum, Chicago, sailed last week for Lon- 
don and Tibet, where he hopes to unearth many 
treasures. Before leaving he said : "My entrance 
to Tibet will be opposed by the British, Russians 
and Chinese, I am afraid, but I hope to be able to 
get in some how and discover more than the Brit- 
ish by armed force could." Mr. Lauer is not mak- 
ing his path easy by thus announcing his purpose 
beforehand, as other explorers have discovered .be- 
fore him when silence is too late. American gar- 
rulity is rather a joke at the British Museum, which 
has been enriched by perhaps a warranted and ruth- 
less contempt for "native" prejudices in favor of 
exclusion and expulsion. 

Martin J. Jackson gave a studio tea Thursday to 
show some of the pictures he is preparing for exhi- 
bition at Steckels' in February. 



If YOU want, the BEST 



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...GO TO... 



FINISHING 



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Bank 

Los Angeles, California 
Established 1889 


1 908 ! 

.$14,977,787.99 

2,870,681.34 

292,000.00 

66,467.11 

149,274.19 

. 3,293,516.38 


Statement, January 1, 


Resources 
Loans on Real Estate 




Real Estate 

Vaults, Furniture and Fixtures 


Liabilities 
Capital Stock Paid in 


$21,649,727.01 

$ 850,000.00 

452,537.81 

20,347,189.20 




Total Depositors, 45,000 
The Foregoing is the statement of th 
SAVINGS BANK with which has 
consolidated the Southern California 


$21,649,727.01 

. SECURITY 
recently been 
Savings Bank. 



26 



Pacific Outlook 




A Wise Fool 

There is that rare sympathetic quality in Joseph 
A. Galbraith's acting which gives him power over 
both the thoughtful and the merely emotional ele- 
ments of an audience. His return to the Belasco 
forces this week in "A Gilded Fool" was an event of 
pleasure to the host of admirers of this already ver- 
satile company, as was abundantly proved by the 
reception that was tendered the popular and pol- 
ished comedian the opening night and continued 
nightly throughout the week. 

The well-known Nat Goodwin part of Chauncey 
Short in 'A Gilded Fool" fits Galbraith's talents so 
nicely that it is well nigh impossible to find an}- hole 
in the interpretation wherein to aim a shaft of criti- 
cism. While the role is a comedy part, it has no 
touch of the farcical, and Galbraith is fully alive to 
its varying moods and requirements of delicate 
shading. 

The role of Chauncey Short is the only one of any 
distinction in this play. The rest are merely acces- 
sories to the principal part. However, there are 
two other players in this production who make 
themselves felt, even through inadequate mediums. 
These are Harry Glazier in the "mean" part of 
Bannister Strange and Dorothy Bernard as the pert 
and ingenuous Nell Audrey Ruthven. Mr. Glazier's 
particular ability to look a part and quietly convey 
its meaning through facial rather than oral expres- 
sions, is felt in this role. In the exact opposite of 
this character little Miss Bernard, in her turn, makes 
a most artistic showing. 

Miss Emmet has an unimpressive part as Mar- 
garet Ruthven, daughter of Matthew Ruthven, 
banker, interpreted by William Yerance. The ver- 
satile Howard Scott appears as Rev. Jacob Howell, 
"who has a ■ mission," and John Daly Murphy is 
amusing as Perkins, Chauncey Short's "man." 

The Gilded Fool turns out to be a wise sort of 
a fool, after all, and Galbraith proves himself wise 
to the part. 



The best thing that can be said of the week's 
production at the Auditorium, called "The Redskin," 
is that it is beautifully staged. In other respects 
the Ferris company struggles valiantly with an .im- 
possibility. 

As a series of tableaux this thinly woven story 
of Indian life in the forest before the white man 
had hewn it away is wonderfully effective, and the 
six acts, containing nine different tableaux, are 
staged most generously. But the thoughts of un- 
spoiled Indians, however poetical they may be (and 
there is more innate, unstudied poetry in the aver- 
age Indian than there is in 'the average white man) 
cannot be represented in Shakespearian blank verse 
and carry any conviction. The text of "The Red- 
skin" may not be written in blank verse exactly, but 



many of the spoken lines sound so alarmingly like it 
and carry such a ridiculous sense of incongruity to 
anyone whose ear is familiar with both the brief, 
graphic style of Indian declamation and the sonor- 
ous roll of Shakespeare's periods, as to destroy any 
illusion which the truly delightful scenic effects 
may have at first produced. 

The Indians of "The Redskin" are not Indians. 
Of course, we well understand that the whole thing 
is idealized, as such subjects must be always to some 
extent for literary use, but in this case the idealiza- 
tion is carried beyond the breaking point. For in- 
stance, the treatment of the chief's daughter as a 
princess, the regal deference which is accorded her, 
as in the case of her entrance in one act under a 
decorated canopy borne by attendants, and the veri- 
tably royal prerogatives which she is pictured as 
exercising — all these are utterly at variance with the 
strong, simple, direct and really democratic life 
which characterized the aboriginal existence of all 
tribes of native Americans north of what is now 
Mexico. Naturally enough, a drama of such a life 
cannot be adapted to the stage without embellish- 
ment and the sacrifice of many scientific accuracies ; 
but "The Redskin" seems to us to be so wide of the 
mark at which it aims as to miss almost all that is 
really and inherently dramatic in the graphic and 
unincumbered life of the American Indian. 

Miss Stone in the part •of Adulola, the "Lily of 
Namobin," beautiful daughter of Lonawanda, great 
chief of the Ochatchee, gives the charm of her art 
and personality to the overdrawn character to such 
a degree as to elicit a certain sympathy from the 
auditor, despite the fundamental impossibilities of 
the part. She makes up very prettily in the black 
hair and tawny raiment of this part, though the 
blonde Miss Stone is the one with power, and to 
those who recall the splendid dignity of her "Kate 
Shannon" of the week before, the contrast cannot 
but be disappointing. 

Joseph Kilgour makes a dignified "great chief of 
the Ochatchee" and is quite successful in smothering 
his transatlantic accent. The rest do the best they 
can in misfit roles. 

The costuming of the play is rich and the presence 
on the stage in some of the scenes of real Indians 
in handsome real Indian costumes adds interest. 
Antonio Apache was engaged to plan these details. 

As the basis of an opera "The Redskin" might be 
successful, but as a drama it is hopelessly artificial. 



"You ask me what I think of Peg Woffington : 
I think she is an impudent faced Irish girl", declared 
Horace Walpole long ago ; but the Peg who is pic- 
tured in the play, "Pretty Peggy", and interpreted 
at the Burbank this week by Miss Blanche Hall has 
much of worth beneath her prettily impudent 
countenance. 

"Pretty Peggy" is nicely done by the Morosco 



Pacific Outlook 



27 



organization and its picturesque old London atmos- 
sphere and becoming costumes give it a spectacular 
charm apart from the real cleverness of the play 
and ability of the players. 

Miss Hall is quite delightful in the role of Peg, 
the pert and off-hand but innocent and true Irish 
lassie whom David Garrick finds in Dublin, entices 
to London, and after putting her on 1 the road to 
fame there as an actress, breaks the heart out of 
her. Her assumption of the Irish blarney is quite 
charming, and whatever is lender or strong in the 
part she discloses convincingly. 

Aside from Miss Hall, no other member of the 
company stands out with any particular distinction, 
unless it be H. J. Ginn in the small part of Caven- 
dish, the fortune teller. While the role is limited, 
its possibilities are vividly developed by him. Wil- 
liam Esmond is strikingly handsome as David Gar- 
rick, but there is no great force in his impersonation 
of that famous English actor of early days. Harry 
Mestaver is pleasing as Sir Charles Hanbtiry and. 
John W. Burton gives an amusing characterization 
of the Earl of Cholmondeley. There is a peppery 
scene between the Earl of Cholmondeley and Peg 
Woffington in the second act (the setting being the 
green room of Covent Gardent Theater, London) 
which both Mr. Burton and Miss Hall carry 
through with delightful success. Elsie Esmond fits 
very prettily the part of Peg's sister, Polly, and the 
Mrs. Woffington of Louise Royce furnishes abun- 
dant fun of the hilarious sort. 

The four acts are handsomely staged, and as a 
whole the production is an effective one. 



Cunningham, Kunkel and dainty Daphne Pollard 
make the week at the Los Angeles Theater well 
worth while. In "Ship Ahoy" these favorites have 
kept the nightly audiences enlivened and interested 
from start to finish. The cunning Daphne is suc- 
cessful far beyond what her diminutitive presence 
would seem to warrant. 

There is dash and spirit in this production, and 
the popularity of the San Francisco Opera Com- 
pany's principals makes the Los Angeles a busy 
showhouse every night. L. B. 



Theater Notes 
No doubt the immense seating capacity of the 
Auditorium will be taxed during the next week or 
two by the Ferris production of "The Holy City," 
which proved this company's greatest success last 
season, running five weeks and attracting, it is said, 
117,000 spectators. The plot of "The Holy City" is 
strong ami striking and the play makes a fine ap- 
peal to all classes. The class which seldom enters 
a theater on account of religious prejudices is al- 
ways strongly represented at performances of "The 
Holy City." The stage settings, costuming and 
lighting effects are striking. Miss Florence Stone's 
interpretation of Mary Magdalene is generally con- 
sidered one of the strongest things which she ever 
has done. Several of the other favorite members 
of the company will be seen in roles to which they 
seem especially adapted, and a host of extra people 
will be used in the important scenes. Dick Ferris 
will have personal charge of the lighting effects. 
The drama is laid in the time of Christ, and the 
subject is handled in such a way as not to give of- 
fense to the most sensitive. 



The AUDITORIUM SPAR ^ld B ol R e Y s^ anwr 

"Theatre Beautiful" 

Week of January 20. Matinees Wednesday 
and Saturday 

The FERRIS STOCK COMPANY 

and 

FLORENCE STONE 



In Last Season's Wonderful Success 



ally 



Prices: 10, 25, 35 and SO cents. Matinees: 10 and 25 cents 

Phones: F 2367, Main 5186 

In Preparation, WAY OUT WEST, with Dick Ferris in the Cast 



SIMPSON'S AUDITORIUM 


Music Announcements Week — January 20th 


HERBERT WITHERSPOON 


Monday Night, January 20th— 8:15 o'clock 
POSTPONED CONCERT 


JOSEF HOFMANN, Pianist 


Thursday Night, January 23 
Saturday Matinee, January 25 


Seat Sales Now on at 


THE BARTLETT MUSIC STORE 


Prices: 50c, 75c, $1,00, $1.50 and $2.00. 




• All the best- 



INSTRUMENTS 

For Band or Orchestra 

The only Collection of Fine Old Violins in the West 

Easy payments if desired 

jFit30eralb's 

113 South Spring Street 



Have You 

Attended our Great Holiday Factory Sale or Pianos 

Free Music Scholarship 

Discounts from our Factory Prices 
Sale Closes December 14 

D. H. BALDWIN ®, CO. 

The Auditorium 431 W. Fifth St.. 



28 



Pacific Outlook 



Apparently George W. Barnum, the much loved 
veteran actor who is rejoining the Belasco com- 
pany, will be accorded a heart-warming reception at 
the Belasco Monday night. The demand for seats 
for "The Education of Mr. Pipp" proves that Los 
Angeles is as loyal as ever to Barnum. Augustus 
Thomas was inspired to write the comedy of real 
life, "The Education of Mr. Pipp," by Charles Dana 
Gibson's series of drawings, in which this character 
figured. 

These five new plays will receive their footlight 
baptism at the Belasco during the last week of this 
month and through February : "Commencement 
Days," "The Wolf," "The Energetic Mr. West," 
"Little Dorritt" and "The Education of Elizabeth," 



Symphony Concert 

The first concert of the Los Angeles Symphony 
Orchestra took place Friday afternoon, Jan. 1Q, at 
the Auditorium, under the direction of Harley Ham- 
ilton. The overture to "Fidelia," the opening num- 
ber, was not entirely enjoyable, as the horn players 
were not up to the standard of the demands of their 
parts, and distinguished themselves throughout the 
whole performance by an uncertain attack of the 
note, marring many beautiful phrases. 

More successful was Mr. Hamilton with the Irish 
Rhapsody by Standfort, which he rendered with real 
spirit and a taste and understanding which were 
appreciated by the big audience. 

The soloist was Herbert Witherspoon, a singer of 




Josef Hofmann 



This is quite a remarkable'showing of premieres for 
a little Western burg to make, especially as several 
other new productions have already been made this 
season at other local theaters. 

It is rumored that Lewis Stone, the popular lead- 
ing man at the Belasco, may accept a New York en- 
gagement before long. 

The San Francisco Opera Company will present 
"Dolly Varden" at the Los Angeles Theater during 
the coming week. This company has drawn a most 
flattering patronage during its engagement here. 

"A Square Deal" will be the bill at the Burbank 
during the coming week. 



wide reputation, with a voice which is a decided bar- 
itone in range and timbre. His voice is well trained 
and naturally beautiful as long as he sings within 
its range, which is very limited, as neither his high 
or low E is able to produce any sound which we 
may call a tone. To the aria from Thomas' "Le Cid" 
(spelled wrongly in the programme "Caid" and con- 
scientiously reprinted thus in the daily papers), Mr. 
Witherspoon did not do justice 1 , as his voice is not 
flexible and his French pronunciation is not pure 
enough. Songs within the range of his voice must 
be a treat to listen to, as Mr. Witherspoon's inter- 
pretation is intelligent and tasteful. VERO. 



Pacific Outlook 



29 



Gamut Club Supper 

The members of the Gamut Club entertained with 
a supper and reception Monday evening in honor of 
three visiting musicians. Herbert Witherspoon, 
\iKla Verne and Mme. Krans. A unique supper 
menu was served, made np of distinctive dishes of 
various countries, and the table was beautifully dec- 
orated, 2.000 white carnations being used in its em- 
bellishment. Harley Hamilton presided as toast- 
master. Later Adeia Wine rendered sevral selec- 
tions on the piano and Mme. Kraus sang. The won- 
derful English pianist so enthused her audience by 
her playing that the fortunate auditors fairly shout- 
ed their appreciation. In the gathering were many 
of the most accomplished musicians of the city. 

During the evening the following board of di- 
rectors was elected for the ensuing year: Harley 
Hamilton, Dr. John R. Haynes, Charles Farwell Ed- 
son, F. \V. Blanchard. Charles Pemberton. The 
following named were appointed to the Entertain- 
ment and Programme Committee: Joseph Dupuy, 
Arnold Krause, Frank H. Colbv. 



Josef Hofmann 

It is a number of years since the celebrated pian- 
ist, Josef Hofmann, first visited California, and since 
that time he has gradually increased in dignity and 
artistic temperament, until now he stands as one of 
the representative pianists of the world. He is one 
of the most interesting of the many pianists who are 
to appear in Los Angeles this winter under the 
Behymer management. 

Intelligent insight and great dexterity are claimed 
for Hofmann's playing. Now thirty years of age, 
he is attempting most ambitious compositions. He 
is credited with much artistic feeling and wealth of 
expression and is said to have added a new side, a 
sensuous side, to the music he plays. His style is 
manly and unaffected, and a technique well nigh 
faultless is demonstrated. 

Hofmann will appear at Simpson Auditorium 
Thursday evening, Jan. 2i, and Saturday matinee, 
Jan. 25. The evening programme will be as follows : 



Adela Verne to Play Again 

Adela Verne has the genuine musical tempera- 
ment, and her playing is distinguished not only by 
splendid technique, but by the powerful interpreta- 
tion of the true musician. In difficult and compli- 
cated passages she maintains feeling and expression 
without once degenerating into mere technical ex- 
actness. Her playing is characterized by two seem- 
ingly paradoxical qualities, feminine delicacy and 
masculine firmness. 

Miss Verne made such an artistic success Wed- 
nesday night at Simpson Auditorium that a series 
of additional recitals have been arranged, the first of 
which will take place at Simpson Auditorium Sat- 
urday afternoon, Feb. 1. Miss Verne's programmes 
are exceedingly interesting and contain a great vari- 
ety of Ci impositions. 



Americans Now Appreciated 

Up to a very recent period, we were accustomed 
to turn a cold shoulder to the concert artist who 
lacked a foreign name and a foreign manner. The 
more remote his birthplace, the more outlandish his 
name, the wider his mane and mien, the more Amer- 
ican dollars were poured into his pockets. For our 



native-born artists, we had only a good-natured 
tolerance. We hired them to play and sing for us, 
only when we couldn't get the foreigners, or when 
we couldn't pay the foreigners' price. 

A.S we began to outgrow the swaddling clothes of 
our musical culture, the knowledge dawned upon us 
that the American artists whom we were neglecting 
at home were being made much of abroad. We first 
learned from Europe how to appreciate our great 
opera singers. Then Fannie Bloomfield Zeisler, a 
Chicago woman, created a furore from one end of 
Europe to the other by her pianistic genius. It 
was European appreciation that first brought us a 
realizing sense of the greatness of our composer, 
I'M ward MacDowell. A constant repetition of such 
instances has begun to have its effect, and today, 
in the wide spread of musical culture throughout the 
country the old unpatriotic prejudice against the 
native artist is fast disappearing. 



Best to Study Here 

Concerning the comparative value of Aemrican 
and European study for a girl with operatic ambi- 
tions, a writer in the New York Tribune says, in 
part: 

"That the United States is now the best place to 
secure training in music is the opinion of American 
singers of world reputation who have studied 
abroad. 'American singing masters are best, but 
the young singer, after getting training here, should 
go abroad to get experience in singing in repertoire,' 
is the consensus of opinion among American operat- 
ic stars. This superiority in American training 
methods, which is a matter of growing knowledge 
and pride among the professionals, is as yet scarce- 
ly guessed among the people generally, who think 
of Italy, Germany or Paris as musical meccas for 
beginners, but it is coming to be recognized by 
wealthy music-lovers. 

" 'Should the American girl go abroad to learn 
opera?' was the question put to Mme. Eleanor de 
Cisneros, the mezzo-soprano of the Manhattan Op- 
era House, an American woman born in New York. 
' 'Yes,' was her reply, 'but only after She has 
completed her studies in America under a good 
teacher. There are just as good vocal instructors 
in America, if one selects the right ones, as there 
are in Europe, and an American girl can have her 
voice and do all that merely study can do for her 
right at home. Then, if she finds that she has a 
voice of operatic calibre, has the temperament, has 
gained the correct accent of the foreign language in 
which she is to sing and has acquired the foreign 
operatic traditions, she should go abroad to gain 
repertoire and actual experience in opera. This last 
she cannot gain in her own country, for a substi- 
tute's position at one of our opera houses, or even 
a debut in an important role, does not seem to give 
her a chance to become a real star. She must gain 
her reputation abroad and then be re-engaged for 
American opera through the booking agencies of 
Italy or some other country.' " 



Music Notes 

Jan Kubelik. the famous violinist, whose work al- 
ready is well known and appreciated here, will ap- 
pear in Los Angeles the evenings of Tuesday, Tan- 
nary 28, and Thursday, January 30. Kubelik is 
well described by saying that when his ambition 



30 



Pacific Outlook 



made of him one of the world's greatest violinists, 
nature surrendered claim to a poet whose work 
would in all probability have brought him greater 
fame and a permanent place in the hearts of all na- 
tions. 

In local musical circles the statement is made that 
despite the apparent financial stringency noticeable 
in many lines of activity this winter the season is 
the busiest that Los Angeles musicians ever have 
known. 

One of the most interesting persons on the stage 
this season is little Corinne Malvern, a "prima 
donna" five years old, who appears in the part of 
"Trouble" in the Henry W. Savage production of 
"Madam Butterfly." While the child has no lines 
to speak, she bears herself on the stage with all the 
dignity of a principal. 

Owing to a slight illness Herbert Witherspoon 
was unable to appear in concert at Simpson Audito- 
rium Tuesday evening, or at the Garrick Theatre 
in San Diego Wednesday evening. He has entirely 
recovered from his indisposition, however, and the 
same programme which was to have been given 
Tuesday will be presented Monday night, January 
20, at Simpson Auditorium. For those who have 
secured seats for this entertainment, the same seats 
will be held, and the season tickets for the third 
event of the Philharmonic Course will be good at 
that time. It will not be necessary to exchange 
seats at the box office. 

'Marion Ivel, the young American cotnrolto who 
met with great success in the Savage English grand 
opera productions, made her debut at Nantes, 
France, recently in "La Favorita'' and will remain 
there all season, appearing in fifteen different roles. 



XLhc flfcacbants National 
== Bank =^=^= 



Of Los Angeles 



■ UNITED STATES DEPOSITORY 

Capital $200,000.00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits . . $475,000.00 
Deposits $3,860,000.00 

W. H. Holliday President 

Marco H. Hellman Vice-President and Cashier 

W. L. Graves Vice-President 

H. T. Newell Vice-President 

Percy R. Wilson Vice-President 

Henry Anderson Asst. Cashier 



Directors 



W. A. Barker 

E. P. Bosbyshell 
Marco H. Hellman 
L. C. Brand 

W. L. Graves 
W. H. Holliday 

F. M. Lyon 
Will E. Keller 



N. Bonfilio 
H. T. Newell 
E. T. Stimson 
M. N. Newmark 
Percy R. Wilson 
Irving H. Hellman 
M. A. Hamburger 



THIS BANK WILL MOVE TO NEW LOCA- 
TION, SOUTHEAST CORNER THIRD AND 
SPRING STREETS, LANKERSHIM 
BUILDING 



Sweden's New King and Queen 

King Gustavus V., who took the oath of office 
within a few hours of his father's death, on Decem- 
ber 8, has suffered something resembling his father's 
fate as Crown Prince. Overshadowed by the more 
brilliant gifts and more attractive personality of the 
parent, he has for years been spoken of in a rather 
disparaging manner in Sweden, while in Norway 
he harvested outright hatred in return for his deter- 
mined upholding of the union, writes a Swedish- 
American in the Review of Reviews. On frequent 
occasions during the last decade he has acted as 
vice-regent while his father was sick or traveling, 
and in this way he has found chance to display 
qualities that have gradually changed the popular 
regard of him from one of suspicion to one of 
hearty respect. His nearsightedness, his reserve of 
manner, his very sincerity and serious mindedness 
have militated against him, but is seems probable 
that he will prove the very best ruler Sweden could 
desire at the present juncture. He is slow to make 
up his mind, and will not do so until he has searched 
every phase and detail of the problem before him, 
but once he has come to a conclusion he pursues his 
path without looking to right or left. 

The new queen was the Princess Victoria of 
Baden, through whom, by a strange play of circum- 
stances, the claims of the extinct House of Vasa, — 
the last direct descendant of which passed away a 
few days after King Oscar, in the person of Carola, 
Dowager-Queen of Saxony, and daughter of the de- 
posed King Gustavus Adolphus IV. of Sweden, — 
may be said to have become joined with those of 
the reigning House of Bernadotte, and through her, 
her son, the present Crown Prince, is a descendant 
of both those houses. 



Jurat IRational Bank 



Los Angeles, Cal. 



Largest National Bank in the Southwest 



Statement of Condition at Close of Business 
December 3d, 1907 



RESOURCES 

Loans and Discounts $10,185,544.73 

Bonds, Securities, Etc 2,588,674.03 

Clearing House Loan Certificates 87,000.00 

Clearing House Scrip 69,264.00 

Cash and Sight Exchange 4,190,900.94 

Total $17,121,383.70 

LIABILITIES 

Capital Stock $ 1,250,000.00 

*Surplus and Undivided Profits 1,499,001.65 

Circulation 1,242,100.00 

Bonds Borrowed 145.000.00 

Deposits 11,685,282.05 

Other Liabilities' 1,300,000.00 

Total $17,121,383.70 



•"ADDITIONAL ASSETS— One Million Five Hun 
dred Thousand Dollars 



Invested in the stock of the Los Angeles Trust 
Company and the Metropolitan Bank and Trust Co., 
and held by the Officers of the First National Bank, 
as Trustees, in the interest of the shareholders of 
that Bank. 



ILos Angeles, Califor 



THE DES MOINES PLAN 



January 25. 1908 




Pacific Outlook 



the city would give the people of this city an evi- 
dence of good faith in their publicly announced and 
frequently repeated determination to see that the 
laws shall be enforced, there would be fewer Sunday 
drunks and a greatly lessened tax upon the capacity 
of the city jail. But decent people, regardless of 
politics, have about given up hope that the present 
administration will do anything tending to hamper 
the abominable traffic of the whisky and beer mer- 
chants. "Booze," the strong right arm of the ma- 
chine politician, wherever he may be' found, is yet 
too potent an influence in local politics to be ignored. 

* * * 

THE POLITICIANS have given up trying to 
understand Mayor Taylor of San Francisco. Every 
official act of his thus far appears to have been 
based on no precedent. He already has proven 
himself to be one of the very poorest politicians 
in the country, measured by the standard of poli- 
ticians themselves, and at the same time one of 
the very best mayors. Not long ago a friend of a 
well-known resident of San Francisco called on 
Mayor Taylor. The conversation ran something 
like this: "Mayor, I hope you will be able to see 

your way clear to appointing Mr. to 

this office." "Does Mr. want the office?" 

inquired the mayor. "He does — 
Not Governed he wants it very much," was the 
by Precedent quick reply. "Then," said this pre- 
cedent-breaking executive, "1 most 
surely shall not appoint him. The office must seek 
the man — not the man the office." This is the rule 
Mayor Taylor has followed without variation. So 
accustomed have the people of San Francisco be- 
come to the selection of men for municipal office 
because of their "influence" in one quarter or an- 
other that man)' of them — including some who ex- 
pected the new mayor to follow the policy to which 
he so strictly adheres — even yet can hardly realize 
that the reins of government are finally in the 
hands of a man who is determined that the sole 
qualifications of a prospective appointee must be 
fitness — integrity and ability. 

* * * 

IF ANYTHING further were needed to bring 
conviction that a new order of things has been 
established in San Francisco it will be found in 
Mayor Taylor's attitude respecting the granting of 
franchises to public utility corporations. A short 
time since the supervisors adopted an ordinance 
conferring upon the Santa Fe Railroad Company 
a franchise to build a spur track upon one of the 
streets. If San Francisco's mayor had followed 
the rule which formerly obtained in Los Angeles 
he would have accepted the action of the municipal 
legislature as a reflection of the 
Thinks Streets voice of the people and approved 
Are Valuable the franchise. Instead of that he- 
vetoed the action of the supervi- 
sors on the ground that the street sought by the 
railway company was too valuable to give away 
for the purposes of the corporation. Such executive 
action is almost unknown in California cities, ex- 
cepting in Los Angeles, where railway corporations 
are now asked to pay something, however small 
the amount may be, for the privilege of monopoliz- 
ing streets. The people of San Francisco will get 
accustomed to Mayor Taylor's idiosyncrasies in 
time and future generations will arise and call his 
name blessed. 



IN THE OPINION of most men Mayor Harper 
is committing a grievous error in postponing exe- 
cutive action in regard to the reappointment of 
James A. Anderson to the Board of Public Works. 
If he is engaged in a deep game of practical politics 
he is committing a tactical error. If he is consider- 
ing the matter purely from the standpoint of an 
official who has the best interests of the whole peo- 
ple at heart he is committing the error of so acting 
as to permit the impression to go forth that he re- 
gards his own private opinions in the matter as of 
more concern than those of thousands of intelli- 
gent, observant public-spirited men of Los Angeles 

who demand that Mr. Anderson shall 

Suspicious be retained in this body. The air is 

Delay full of innuendo. The people in large 

numbers have grown decidedly sus- 
picious of the mayor and his motives in this con- 
nection. Already more than three weeks have 
elapsed since the term of Mr. Anderson expired. It 
has been said that the mayor's delay in making- the 
appointment is due to a belief on his part that Mr. 
Anderson is still an incumbent of the office. That 
this is not the case is indicated by the provision of 
the City Charter which reads : "The term of office 
of .the three members first appointed hereunder 
shall commence on the first Monday in January, 
1906, and said three members shall so classify them- 
selves by lot that one shall go out of office at the 
end of two years, one at the end of three years, and 
one at the end of four years thereafter." 

* * * 

IN NO SECTION of the article relating to the 
Board of Public Works are we able to find any- 
thing further affecting the terms of office of its 
members. The best lawyers of the city are agreed 
that the term of Mr. Anderson has expired. This 
being so, and the mayor having definitely pledged 
himself to reappoint Mr. Anderson, provided that 
the latter will accept the office again, and Mr. An- 
derson having publicly signified his willingness to 
serve the city another term, the delay of three 
weeks bears a suspicious appearance. The Herald, 
a Democratic newspaper, though avowedly inde- 
pendent in local matters, demands the immediate 
reappointment of Mr. Anderson. The Examiner, 
which is regarded by many as a Democratic paper, 
voices public opinion in this matter and goes so 
far as to inquire: "Is there politics or is there graft 
behind the failure to reappoint Mr. An- 
"Peanut" derson ?" Every other paper and every 
Politics? individual not affiliated with the Demo- 
cratic coterie of the city insists that the 
reappointment should be made. In view of these 
circumstances the delay of the mayor is mysterious 
and fraught with suspicion that he has some secret 
reason for refusing to keep his promise. The whole 
thing savors of that cheap brand of "peanut" poli- 
tics which has made the present administration con- 
temptible in the eyes of those who would see the 
affairs of the city conducted along lines of decency 
and due consideration of the welfare of the com- 
munity, rather than that any official of the city 
shoulcl be employing his office with the apparent 
design of creating a political machine. One of the 
most inexplicable things which has marked the ad- 
ministration of municipal affairs in Los Angeles 
for the past year is the apparent inability of Mayor 
Harper to understand the temper of the people. Ii 
well-nigh surpasses human comprehension. 



Pacific Outlook 



THIS DISCUSSION naturally brings us back 
to the subject of the proposed new charter. In view 
of the attitude of Mayor Harper on the Board of 
Public Works matter and the possibility that similar 
situations may be created in the future, to the em- 
barrassment of the city at a time when it is impera- 
tive that some office of creat importance should be 
promptlj filled, we believe that the charter revision 
committee should propose to the voters thai ap- 
pointments to public office should be made by the 
mayor within thirty days after the 

Here Is a expiration of terms of office, or, in 
Remedy the event of the failure of the ex- 
ecutive to make such appointments 
within the period prescribed, that the council should 
do so without the consent of the mayor. It will be 
comparatively easy to work out the details of such 
a proposition. The city has had its lesson during 
the past month or so, and all future contingencies 
of this nature should lie provided for in the City 
Charter. It is unthinkable that any public official, 
mayor or poundmaster, should have it in his power 
to embarrass the city or any other official or com- 
mission by his failure or neglect to abide by the 
charter provisions adopted for his governance. 

* * * 

FOLLOV\ [NG its usual custom of endeavoring 
to mislead its readers on matters in which it has a 
more or less direct personal interest, the Times on 
\\ ednesday, assailed, by innuendo, the Home Tele- 
phone Company of this city, declaring that "never 
was a greater outrage practiced upon any commun- 
ity than in the unloading of hot-air-inflated securi- 
ties on the public to float a duplicate telephone sys- 
tem for the cinching of the people and the enrich- 
ment of a few millionaire promoters," etc. It is 
hardly likely that all the inhabitants of Los Angeles 
have so soon forgotten the causes which led to the 
organization of the Home company, at which the 
attack of the Times is directed. The character of 
the monopoly controlling the Sunset lines, the 

abominable, nerve-wrecking quality 

Lest We of, its local service — these are too 

Forget , fresh in the minds of residents of this 

city to need more than a bare men- 
tion. When the Sunset service reached that degen- 
erate state which was accepted by telephone patrons 
as evidence that the company did not propose to 
take any steps looking to an appreciable improve- 
ment in its service there arose a strong popular de- 
mand for the organization of a local company. The 
Home Telephone Company is the outgrowth of that 
demand. The story of its operations and its final 
ascendancy in the local field, with a well-written 
article elucidating the mystery of the operation of 
the automatic branch of the Service, will appear in 
next week's issue of the Pacific Outlook. The mis- 
apprehensions regarding the status of the two com- 
panies and the service performed by each, which 
may follow the untruthful statements made in the 
Times editorial referred to, should he cleared away; 
and this the Pacific Outlook will undertake to do 
next week. 

* * * 

FRED F. WHEELER, the recognized leader of 
the Prohibitionists of California ami the probable 
nominee of his party for the presidency of thtf 
United Males this year, stated some undeniable 
truths iii the course of his address before the Unity 

Club the oilier evening. Some of the argument- in 



Favor of the total prohibition of the liquor traffic 

are familiar to all, but they will bear repetition. 
< Hhers were rather new. The result of prohibition 
where it has been tried can he summed up briefly 
as follows: "A whole generation of boys and girls 
have grown to manhood and womanhood in the 
rural districts of Maine and Kansas and have never 
seen a saloon or a drunken man in their lives. Maine 
was originally the poorest state in the Union. 

Today it has more savings bank de- 
Growth of positors than it has voters and is the 
Prohibition only state in the Union of which this 

can be truthfully stated. It seems 
hard to realize that the great and prosperous state 
of Ohio, with six times the population of Maine, 
contains a less number of depositors and less 
money in its savings banks, than does Maine by 
many millions. No other Northern state has so 
large a percentage of its population in the public 
schools, and no state equals her in the number of 
teachers in proportion to the school population. 
The internal revenue reports prove eloquently that 
the consumption of liquor in Maine, Kansas and 
North Dakota is only a fraction of that in licensed 
states. A comparison between Kansas, a prohibi- 
tion: state, and Nebraska, a license state, is amazing" 
The increase of population, the number of inmates 
in the prisons and penitentiaries as well as the 
poorhouses, the attendance in public schools, the 
increase in wealth, all go to prove the wisdom of 
the prohibition law as against the license law." 

* * * 

IT IS NOT LIKELY that three or four years 
ago one per cent of the temperance people of the 
United States expected to live to see the time when 
prohibition would be an accomplished fact. Rut 
the very recent amazing change in popular senti- 
ment on this matter, amounting to almost a revolu- 
tion, now indicates that the absolute prohibition of 
the liquor traffic in the majority of states, if not 
in the nation, is a contingency not so remote as 
to be regarded as improbable. The chimera of 
yesterday is a stern fact today in several states and 
in hundreds of communities in other states. So 
strong has the national prohibition organization 
become that wise political leaders in both parties 
recognize the fact that before long a prohibition 
plank in the platform of one of the predominant 
political parties may decide the presidential elec- 
tion. Who will dare say that national 
Change in prohibition is not as near today as the 
Sentiment emancipation of the slaves was in 
1860? Hundreds of thousands of vot- 
ers of a liberal turn of mind so far as partisan poli- 
tics is concerned, but rather radical in their views 
on questions of morality, are getting into a frame 
i f mind which will render them not the most ob- 
stinate material upon which the party Prohibition- 
ists may direct their attacks. In Los Angeles, for 
example, there are many splendid men. thoughtful, 
discreet, progressive, who. realizing the fact that 
the saloon is a powerful influence in both party 
organizations, are fast reaching the conclusion that 
between prohibition and any movement which ever 
so slightly recognizes the liquor traffic iniquity they 
ultimately must espouse the cause of prohibition. 
And from municipal or county to national politics 
is not a \ei\ far cry in these days. 

* * * 

SIDNEY J. DILLON, a distinguished attorney 
and a member of the committee which drafted the 



Pacific Outlook 



city charter of Des Moines, Iowa, which has a 
population of about 100,000 and all the vices and 
advantages of larger cities, expresses the opinion 
that his city has the same problems to meet that 
confront other municipalities and that consequently 
if the charter now in force in Des Moines points the 
way to a solution of these problems, a document 
framed along the same general lines will be found 
to be effective in other cities. The movement which 
resulted in the adoption of the much-discussed Des 

Moines charter was not sporadic but, 

Des Moines in the words of Mr. Dillon, "came 

Plan about because of the conviction on 

the part of the business men that: 
there was general inefficiency and extravagance or 
wastefulness in our city government." In Mr. Dil- 
lon's article describing the processes by which the 
charter was finally secured, the objects in view in. 
framing it and the success which has attended the 
efforts of the inhabitants to eliminate that greatest 
of all obstacles to good municipal government — 
partisanship — will be found numerous suggestions 
of value to the commission which is to frame a 
new charter for Los Angeles. Mr. Dillon's paper, 
which was first made public before a meeting of 
the City Club of Chicago a short time ago, appears 
in this issue of the Pacific Outlook. It is worthy 
of study by every progressive citizen. 

* * * 

WHILE FOLLOWNIG closely the Galveston 
plan, which has been described in these columns 
and at greater length in some of the daily press, 
the Des Moines charter contains some features that 
are not to be found in the former. The Des Moines 
plan is even more radical, in some respects, than 
that adopted by the city of Galveston and therefore 
more desirable, in the judgment of many students. 
The foundation of the system is the theory that the 
people, being the original source of all authority, 
should always have a voice, if they desire it, in the 
administration of their local affairs. To this end 
Des Moines has adopted the initiative, the referen- 
dum and the recall, following the 
"A Menace good example set by Los Angeles 
to Decency" when the existing charter of this 
city was adopted. In the Iowa city 
ward lines have been abolished, all city officials be- 
ing elected by the voters at large. As in most cities, 
the people of Des Moines have come to recognize 
the fact that the old ward system of government in 
the source of great laxity and inefficiency, to speak 
in mild terms. Within a few days the grand jury 
of St. Louis county. Mo., has found that the lower 
house of the council, composed of representatives 
of the wards of St. Louis, is "a menace to decency, 
order and good government." The same may truth- 
fully be said of the city council in practically every 
large city which still follows the ward system of 
representation. Los Angeles very recently has be- 
held an example of the possibilities in government 
by ward representatives. 

* * * 

THIS ST. LOUIS grand jury recommends the 
abolition of the bicameral legislative body, suggest- 
ing that in its place there should be substituted a 
commission, in order that the responsibilty for the 
faithful discharge of the duties of public officials 
may be placed on the shoulders of men elected on 
account of their intelligence, character and ability. 
The views of the mayor of St. Louis on this subject 



coincide with those of the grand jury. He says: 
"One of the greatest obstacles to a consistent, har- 
monious and economical method of making im- 
provements in this city is the method of electing 

councilmen by wards. This re- 
Shall We Lead, suits in some wards receiving 
or Follow? improvements that are ill-timed 

and in excess of the proportion- 
ate share to which they are equitably entitled ; 
while other wards do not receive the share that is 
properly due them." From every large city in the 
Union comes similar unanswerable testimony 
against the ward system so long in vogue. Its cost, 
the possibilities of jobbery it offers and other argu- 
ments are too potent to require debate — though the 
people cannot be reminded too often that these 
iniquities must be abolished before decent govern- 
ment can be secured. Los Angeles has led the 
other cities of America in some respects. How 
much longer will it indulge itself in the folly of 
maintaining its present un-American, undemo- 
cratic, jobbery-inviting system of government by 
ward councilmen? 

* * * 

BRAND WHITLOCK. mayor of Toledo, Ohio, 
and one of the most progressive executive officials 
to be found in any American city, says that knaves 
fatten because of a surplusage of fools in our com- 
munities. This appears, at first glance, to be a 
rather strong indictment of the intelligence of 
many American citizens, but upon careful analysis 
we fear that the truth of his daring assertion must 
be admitted. So long as the majority of voters are 
so stupid and so credulous as to remain 1 in a be- 
nighted state rather than to accept the progressive 

policies of government outlined by 

Surplusage thoughtful men who have spent their 

of Fools years in detailed study of plans and 

systems of government and who have 
succeeded, like the men of Galveston and Houston 
and Des Moines — in inducing the people to put such 
of Los Angeles — in inducing the people to put such 
plans in force, just so long will the inhabitants of 
cities suffer from the attitude of those of their fel- 
low-men who are self-deceived. Can anything 
more completely prove the stupidity of the average 
mass of men, for example, than that they allow 
themselves to be divided on questions having not 
even the slightest relation to the welfare of their 
city? For, mark you, so long as the people allow 
themselves to be led into dividing on such questions 
the power of the political boss will be supreme. 

* * * 

A FEW SENTENCES from one of Mayor Whit- 
lock's recent utterances are worth remembering. 
He says: "It is not the so-called worst people in 
the community that are corrupting it; it is the so- 
called best people that are corrupting it. When 
you deal with the politician from the slums you 
have got to pay him well. But the eminently re- 
spectable man barters away the property of the 
city for an invitation to dinner. This sort of cor- 
ruption is not conscious, but it exists nevertheless. 

* * * -yy e must build a civiliza- 

Who Are tion in the American city so that 

Responsible? every man will have the opportunity 

that every other man has. You 
can't have that opportunity when by law you com- 
pel a man to pay five cents to the street railway 
companies for something that is worth only three 






Pacific Outlook 



cents. \\ e must be Free from tyranny of 

special privilege." But how secure our freedom? 
Surely not through a continuance of a system of 
municipal government in which each legislative 
official may. if he is so inclined, fall back upon ilie 
specious plea that he was elected to represent the 
lith or the ninth or some other ward. 

* * * 

l.( )S ANGELES is to be commiserated. It is to 
a new City Charter, provided the voters say 

"yes" to the proposition soon to be submitted to 

them, framed by a lot of "half-baked reformers," 
"new-light experimenters." "cranks." men "con- 
fused in mind or weak in spirit," and a few other 
things. This, according to the Times, is the sort 
of men who are to prepare for submission to the 
voters 'if this city the organic law under which the 
affairs of the municipality are to be conducted, if it 
is adopted at the polls. We should have expected 
the Times to classify such foes to civic corruption 
as Dr. Haynes. Meyer Lissner and Joseph H. Call 

as "half-baked," etc., etc., etc., but it 

Cause of has gone the limit by reaching out 

Its Cursing and attempting to attach the tag of 

dishonor, foolhardiness and asinin- 
ity to William J. Hunsaker, William Mead, Judge 
John D. Works, Frank G. Finlayson and several 
other gentlemen who evidently believe that the 
management of the affairs of a city should be con- 
ducted on business principles rather than that pub- 
lic office should be made the vehicle for securing 
[BdiDiuniu jo jojjuoo .^auiipmu,, jo uopunjad-iad aip 
matters. The fact that the Southern Pacific politi- 
cians do not and cannot control the commission ap- 
pointed to draft the proposed new charter is the 
one thing which will not down, with the Times. The 
fact that it stands for just ordinary decency appears 
to count against it. Even the presence of one lone- 
some machine politician on the commission does 
not take the curse of the Times off the whole body. 
Therefore — carramba and maledicite! 

* * * 

A MORE HEALTHFUL tone will henceforth 
pervade the moral atmosphere of the streets of Los 
Angeles, now that the City Council has passed the 
ordinance forbidding the sale or distribution on the 
streets of racing "tip" sheets of all kinds and Mayor 
Harper has agreed to sign it when it reaches his 
hands. The new ordinance affects 

End of the not only the small sheets which 
"Tip" Sheets have been offered for sale on the 
street corners for some time, but ap- 
plies with equal force to the newspapers which have 
carried the "form charts" and other intelligence re- 
garding the prospects of horses entered in the races 
at Arcadia. The law is a good one. The circulation 
of printed information of this character is most vi- 
cious in its tendency. The maximum fine and im- 
prisonment possible under the ordinance are suffi- 
cient to deter racing promoters and touts from vio- 
lating the law. 

* * * 

AFTER ALL that has been said and written and 
done in regard to the project to make the harbor of 
San Pedro free to the people of California it would 
appear that the community should be thoroughly 
alive to the urgent character of the necessity for 
harmonious and instant and. to the end. unremitting 
activity, if it would prevent the Southern Pa- 



cific railroad and allied corporate interests from 
converting this gift of nature into an instrument by 

which these interests maj retain their strangle hold 
upon the commerce and industry of this section of 
the Southwest. In his remarkable address before 
the City Club last Saturday. Joseph 11. Call directed 
the attention of a large number of interested public 
Spirited men to the successful efforts thus far put 
forth by the railroad to impound and to subjugate 
to its own selfish ends this splendid 
The Harbor harbor site and to the possibilities 
Must Be Free in harmonious popular action in de- 
fense of the plan to create a harbor 
that shall be forever free to the people. The mo- 
tives of the railroad are thoroughly understood; the 
plan of Captain Fries and the necessity of imme- 
diate action i>n the part of the people are likewise 
appreciated by all informed men. That the most 
desperate and probably protracted efforts on the 
part of the people will be necessary to circumvent 
the railroad is also apparent. This is a time when 
every loyal inhabitant of this section of the state 
should enlist in the movement toward the establish- 
ment of a free harbor, one of the essentials to our 
future commercial and industrial development. The 
Southern Pacific's word is not generally- regarded 
"as good as its bond," as one of that company's of- 
ficials expressed it the other day. It must be 
watched at every turn in the proceedings. Its repu- 
tation is bad. Watch it ! 

* * * 

WHILE COMMENT upon the failure of the Re- 
publican State Central Committee to indorse Roose- 
velt or the Roosevelt administration or the candi- 
dacy of Secretary Taft is superfluous, there is one 
point which should be borne in mind by the voters 
of California. In these words the committee, acting 
under orders issued by Boss Herrin, the actual head 
of the organization, indorsed the disgraceful ad- 
ministration of Governor Gillett : "That the Re- 
publican State Central Committee commend and in- 
dorse the administration of Gov. James N. Gillett 
and express the hope and belief that the remainder 
of his term will, as in the past, subserve the best 
interests of the state." This indorsement, of course, 
includes the appointment of such 
Time-Servers time-servers of the Southern Pa- 
Still in Favor cific machine as Lynch for bank- 
commissioner, Loveland for rail- 
road commissioner, Sherer for bank commissioner, 
William McGuire for secretary to the bank com- 
mission, John Mackenzie, the notorious San Jose 
henchman of the Southern Pacific, for state labor 
commissioner, W. V. Stafford, formerly a conductor 
on the Southern Pacific railroad and a tool of Her- 
rin, for head of the board of harbor commissioners 
of San Francisco, and others of the same stripe. 
The men who willingly don the livery of Herrin 
with its "S. P." decorations, from the governor 
down to the secretary of a commission — these are 
favored with the indorsement of the machine; but 
there is no kind word for President Roosevelt nor 
for Secretary Taft. But will the people of Califor- 
nia indorse Roosevelt and his administration and 
Secretary Taft? From the Siskiyous to Tia Juana 
comes one reply, and it is in the affirmative. 

* * * 

THE DEMOCRATS of Los Angeles— by this we 
do not mean to be understood as referring to the 
Democratic politicians alone — are to be congratu- 



Pacific Outlook 



lated in having succeeded in organizing a political 
club whose surrounding atmosphere will be free 
from the possibility of such nauseating disclosures 
as those recently made in connection with the Dem- 
ocratic club which permitted itself to be mixed up 
with a gambling joint scandal. The high character 

of the men at the head of the new 

The New club, which starts upon its career 

Club under the presidency of Thomas E. 

Gibbon, insures an organization 
membership in which will be something of an honor. 
The affiliations of the club which recently has 
sprung into disrepute have been of such a nature as 
to preclude a high standing for it in the eyes of 
disinterested persons. The new club, however, starts 
out under exceedingly happy auspices. So staunch 
friends of good government are its president and 
other officers that it should be welcomed as a bright 
augury of better things in Democratic politics in 
this city. 

* * * 

THE REPORT that independent interests are 
planning to build an electric "air line" between 
Los Angeles and Pasadena along which all grade 
crossings are to be eliminated, the rails to be car- 
ried on trestles above the public roads intersecting 
the right-of-way, should remind the public once 
more of the indisputable fact that the only sure 
method to obviate the most distressing class of 
accidents that characterizes American interurban 
railroading is to do away with the grade crossing. 
The importance of equipping interurban cars with 
safety fenders amounts to little in comparison with 
the importance of carrying railroad lines over or 
under public highways. This was recognized in 
most European countries in the early days of rail- 
road construction, and the elimination of grade 

crossings there has been fol- 

More Important lowed by a great saving in hu- 

Than Fenders man live. Here in the United 

States this, one of the essential 
facts of public safety, is largely ignored. It is 
further stated that the proposed new line is to 
■ enter the heart of the city either above or below 
the surface of the ground. Station platforms are 
to be built at regular stopping places, these land- 
ings to be of the same height as the lowest steps 
of the cars. Here are the three most essential fea- 
tures of safety, and all easy and practicable — elim- 
ination of grade crossings, elevated or sunken way 
across congested city districts, and safe entrance 
to and exit from cars. There will be no need for 
fenders when the chief causes of accident are re- 
moved, and there is small doubt that in the end 
the elimination of the causes would cost the rail- 
ways less than the constant and only partially suc- 
cessful efforts to ease the results to victims of 
accidents which are now accepted as inevitable. 

* * * 

HERE, ALAS, is the typical American spirit of 
"improvement" which has devastated so many of 
our communities of what few objects of artistic 
and historic value as may have chanced to ennoble 
them: " 'Gibbet oak', which for years has stood on 
Allston Way as a landmark of Berkeley and on 
whose branches a Mexican horse thief and high- 
wayman was hanged in 1851, has been felled by the 
woodman's axe. Because of its historic connection 
with the days of the '50's the old oak had been left 



standing when others were felled ; but orders for 
its destruction were issued from the department of 
the superintendent of streets this morning, and the 
old relic is a thing of the past. Improvements are 
to be made on the street, and with the approval of 
the town trustees the landmark 
The Inexorable was ordered destroyed. All that 
Straight Line now remains of the historic oak 
is the portion of the limb around 
which the rope passed at the end of which dangled 
Jesus Mendoza." In such cases (we have had them 
here in Los Angeles) the "improvement" generally 
means the sacrifice of something of beauty and in- 
terest because Nature or chance failed to place it 
exactly the correct mathematical distance from the 
curb dead-line which the city engineer's last survey 
demands for the "improvement" of the street in 
question. We are constantly sacrificing the artistic, 
the historic or the traditional to gain that absolutely 
inartistic, uninteresting and commonizing condition 
— a straight line. There never should be a line 
drawn in municipal improvements so straight that 
it could not swerve for a historic oak. 

* * * 

WITH NO American merchants ships on the 
oceans the United States cannot hope to have any- 
lasting strength on the sea. Build battleships as we 
may, our battle fleets will be always weakened by 
this absence of a native merchant fleet on which 
to place dependence for the transportation of sup- 
porting troops, coal and other vital supplies. Ad- 
miral Evans's great American fleet is compelled to 
coal from foreign bottoms over the whole of it* 
14.000 mile voyage. What would this fleet do for 
this vital necessity if it were undertaking its voy- 
age under the emergencies of war? In case of sud- 
den war how would American troops and supplies 
be rushed in large quantities to American insular 
possessions over-seas? The ships of neutral na- 
tions could not then be hired 
One American in at any price for such service. 
Seven Years In- the case of the present 

cruise, immense sums of money 
are being made by foreign shippers through a pure 
ly national movement of our own, all of which 
profit ought to go into American pockets. It is 
imperative that strong measure be taken to create 
an American deep-sea merchant marine. A graphic 
comment on the disappearance of our shipping 
from the great trade routes of the world is the fol- 
lowing, taken from a report recently made by 
Walter C. Hamm, American consul at Hull, Eng- 
land: "Among the 25,000 or more ships that have 
entered the Humber River ports during the past 
seven years there has been only one ship of Ameri- 
can register. This was the bark Homeward Bound, 
from San Francisco, loaded with barley. In the 
seven and a half years from April, l'JOO, to Octo- 
ber, 1907, only the one ship of American register 
has entered the Humber River. No more striking 
evidence than this probably can be given of the 
decadence of the American merchant marine." 

* * * 

Appropriate 

The Monument Man (after several abortive sug- 
gestions) — How would simple "Gone Home" do? 
Mrs. Newweeds — I guess that would be all right. 
It was always the last place he ever thought of 
going. — Puck. 



Pacific Outlook 



Is ©f ILos 



eles 



Why They Ranh WitH tKe Most Advanced Institutions of America 



*T" HH public school system Di Los Angeles, 
■*• ranking, as it clues, with the most advanced 
public educational institutions of America, has be- 
come the source of great pride to those residents 
he cit\ who take any interest in the progress of 
education. The facts and figures contained in the 
annual report of the superintendent of city schools. 
Dr. E. C. Moore, constitute a showing- which 
probably cannot be equalled by the school system 
of any other city of approximately equal size in the 
United States. The obstacles with which the Board 
of Education and Superintendent Moore have had 
to contend have been set forth from time to time 
in the daily press of the city. Happily the people 
of Los Angeles have co-operated as far as possible 
with the board and the superintendent in their ef- 
forts to make the city school system the equal of 
that of any other city in the country, and the results 
attained have been commensurate with the endeav- 
ors put forth. 

The population of Los Angeles (census of 1900) 
was 102.479. The school census population, April 
15, 1907, was 280,179. The number of buildings in 
which school was kept was 77. The value of school 
building's and furniture was $1,998,995, and the 
value of school grounds $396,700. The total num- 
ber of class rooms in use was 917; the whole num- 
ber of teachers in the schools was 1,020, of whom 
91 were men and 929 were women. The average 
salary of teachers per year was $840.74, that of the 
high school teachers being $1,246.70, of grade teach- 
ers $815.84, of Kindergarten teachers $588.15. 

The number of persons in Los Angeles between 
the ages of 5 and 17 was 48,782, the whole number 
of children registered in the schools, 42,998, being 
an increase of 4,738 over last year. The average 
daily attendance during the year was 30,431. The 
average number of pupils to each teacher was, on 
schools was 37,906. The number of volumes in the 
attendance, 3i. The number of sittings in all 
school library was 60,648. The average cost per 
pupil was, on attendance, $35,76, on enrollment, 
$25.24. The average cost in the Kindergarten was 
$16.91, in primary and grammar grades, $24.22. in 
the high school department, $53.28. 

The number of teachers in the Kindergarten was- 
101, the number of pupils 3,689; in the primary de- 
partment, the number of teachers was 396, in the 
grammar department, 304, in the high schools, 106. 
The number of evening classes was 21, and 847 
pupils were registered in them. The number of un- 
graded classes was 20, and the average number of 
pupils in them, 19. The number of manual training 
centers was 26, and the average number of pupils 
enrolled at each center, 185. There were 14 cen- 
ters for instruction in cookery. The average daily 
attendance for the year was 2'K'~>27. The lowes' 
monthly average, in December, 1897, was 27.630; 
the highest, in \prii, was 31,138. The total enroll- 
ment was 42,998. 

In commenting upon the attitude of the peopl« 

toward the schools, which is the considerati. 

most Fundamental importance. Dr. Moore says that 
il is all that can be desired. "If an American com- 



munity registers its character more clearly in its 
care for the young than in any other way, we may 
take pride in the civic and private virtue which is 
shown here. No other consideration' so completely 
discovers the real heart of a people, for, in the ade- 
quate care of the young, all the civic and private 
virtues find expression. 

"It has not been an easy thing to build up an 
adequate school system in the southwest. The in- 
rush of populations has been so great that every 
year, for the last twenty years, has found the 




Dr. E. C. Moore 
schools crowded far beyond their normal capacity, 
and nothing but the stern and determined resolve 
of the people to provide an education for every child 
within their borders has caused enough tax to be 
levied, enough schoolhouses to be built, and enough 
teachers to be employed, to provide instruction for 
everyone who had a right to it. A community less 
completely devoted to education would not have 
exerted itself to make heavy expenditures necessary 
to care for new armies of boys and girls, as fast as 
they came into its territory. It will always be th - 
boast of this community that its schools have never 
turned any one away." 

Some indication of the rate of increase in school 
attendance from year to year, in this part of the 
world, may be found in the following table, com- 
vled from the school records of Los Angeles : 



TOO I -J 


2606 


pupils 52 


teachers 


lOO-'-.i 


S165 


57 




1903-4 


5449 


60 




1004-5 


54 '7 


- 




JQOJ-t) 


3934 








4728 


155 




The annual 


increase 


in school attendance 



10 



Pacific Outlook 



cent years has been at the rate of ten per cent — a 
rate of increase in school population greater than 
even that of New York City. 

Dr. Moore directs attention to the need of an 
annual building fund, one of his chief arguments 
in support of this demand being found in the fact 
that the figures of .recent years show that the aver- 
age annual increase in school attendance is about 
4,000 pupils, though there is no regular provision 
for meeting it. This increase means fifty pupils to 
one school room, that eighty new school rooms 
must be provided annually, and these school rooms 
cost more than $3,000 each. Consequently the an- 
nual building fund should be not less than $250,000. 
The need of a definite plan for securing school sites 
is also touched upon. 

"But a more crucial test of the people's interest 
in the young is the kind of schools they provide for 
them ; the kind of teachers they place in them, and 
the quality of instruction that the schools offei. 
All these things go back directly to the kind of 
officials which the community elects to preside over 
the welfare of the young. 'As is your school board, 
so are your schools,' is an ancient adage of unques- 
tioned verity. Los Angeles enjoys a well-deserved 
leadership in respect to its Board of Education. In 
the first place, it is a non-partisan board. The 
party, or part system of school control, has been 
given up. Public education has been altogether 
separated from the influence of party politics. As 
was expected, the results have been satisfactory. 
The city school boards have been constituted upon 
this basis for so long a time that, like Kansas City, 
where non-partisan school control has been in ef- 
fect for more than thirty years, it will be 'impossible 
to ever re-instate the miserable device of party con- 
trol again. As long as the people face the question 
squarely, that what they want above everything is 
to safeguard the welfare of the children, there is 
no danger of their electing politicians to administer 
the educational estate. Another point of very great 
advantage lies in the fact that the members of the 
school board represent, not wards or districts, but 
the city as a whole, thus eliminating the special 
consideration of sections and classes altogether. It, 
is an important matter, this of the character of the 
school government of a great city. It is more than 
an economic consideration — it is a moral force, and 
a life-saving agent, whose power for good surpasses 
the bounds of human conception. No foresighted 
community can ever regard it with indifference, or 
allow it to fall into careless hands. 

"One of the results which is bound to come from 
such a method of school control is the raising of 
standards and the absolute elimination of favoritism 
in the appointment of teachers. Such a result has 
come in Los Angeles. This is a favored land, large 
numbers of the more resourceful people of the 
United States turn longingly toward it. Among 
them are hundreds of the best-trained teachers of 
the East. In addition, our five state normal schools, 
our colleges, and the two great universities of Cali- 
fornia are annually graduating large classes of young 
men and women, scores of whom are professionally 
trained for the work of teaching. The normal 
schools of the state, in adopting their entrance regu- 
lations, have declared that they cannot make well- 
equipped teachers of their students unless they 
have had the advantage of a thorough course of 
high school instruction before taking up the profes- 



sional work of the normal school. It has seemed 
well to the Board of Education of Los Angeles to 
accept the definition of professional training laid 
down by the five state normal schools, and here- 
after to employ none but professional trained teach- 
ers." 

Dr. Moore emphasizes the urgent need of a new 
high school building. Sixteen hundred and eighty- 
four students were registered at the Los Angeles 
High School last year, and 1735 at the Polytechnic 
High School. How any more can be crowded inlo 
either place is a mystery. Yet all who come must 
be crowded into these two schools for at least two 
years more, for it will take not less than two years 
to get the money, plan and build another high 
school. A certain odium quite properly attaches to 
an American city which does not somehow or other 
provide such an education for all its young men 
and maidens who care for it. If Los Angeies is to 
escape this disgrace, her people must speedily ac- 
cept the need for a new high school as a most press- 
ing one, and provide the means necessary to con- 
struct it. 

The evening high school, which was opened at 
about the middle of the year, has more than met the 
high expectations of the Board of Education with 
hegard to its usefulness. It is pre-eminently a 
school for workers. Almost all its boys and girls 
and men and women do a day's work in some office 
or factory, store or counting-room, before attend- 
ing its classes. This fact prepares them for very 
serious work there, and on the other hand makes 
their study of much more immediate value to them 
than it can possibly be to students who have only 
an abstract interest in it. The classes are not small, 
and the course of study includes a variety of sub- 
jects of instruction. A class in the theory of edu- 
cation, largely attended by principals of the city 
schools, has been conducted by the superintendent. 
No one of the city schools, not even the high 
schools, is doing a more useful work than the even- 
ing high school. 

Dr. Moore regards a means of safeguarding the 
health of school children as a matter of the graved 
importance. "When the state, for its own protec- 
tion, compels a child to go to school," he says, "it 
pledges itself not to injure itself by injuring the 
child." He says that the Board of Health has done 
its part with great carefulness. Contagious dis- 
eases have not been allowed to get a foothold in or 
to distribute themselves through the medium of 
the classrooms.- The sanitary work of the school 
nurses has been a means or educating' many home^ 
in the ways of cleanliness and health, as well as a 
protection to the children to whom it has minis- 
tered. More such nurses to visit more schools is 
one of our great needs. The work of examining 
children for such defects as it belongs to the public 
schools to make known has gone on throughout the 
year. 

"We believe that the province of the schools is 
distinct from that of the family physician, that the 
line between their respective functions must be very 
clearly drawn. The function of government is to 
hinder hindrances, and not by any means to do 
what the people can and ought to do for themselves. 
The schools must not do the things that can be bet- 
tor done by a score of existing agencies, hospitals, 
clinics, health department, homes, volunteer phy- 
sicians, etc. They must, for the sake of the success 



Pacific Outlook 



11 



of this work itself, keep religiously from every form 
of operative surgery, and thc\ must also confine 
their examinations to five or six fundamental con- 
ditions which bear directly upon school work. It 
is out of the province of a school department to un- 
dertake a general diagnosis of the physical condi- 
tion of every boy and girl under its care. That is 
the business of the family physician-. 'Flic school 
department must confine its efforts to what it can 
carry out. It must not break oft* more than it can 
handle. It has not the money, or the men or the 
duty or the authority to carry out a system of ex- 
tensive examinations." 

With these considerations in mind. Dr. Moore 
recommends the following- outline of work in this 
department for next year: 

"That the physical examination of pupils, under 
the direction of the Board of Education, with a 
working force for the same, be as follows: 

"One director, (who shall at the same time be 
director of the science teaching in the two high 
schools), and two assistants; if possible, two phy- 
sicians: the officers of the staff to be located at the 
Los Angeles High School. 

"One-half of every other day to be devoted to 
High School examinations, the remaining time to 
elementary school examinations. 

"It shall be the duty of class teachers and prin- 
cipals of schools to make such examinations of pu- 
pils as the Director and Superintendent of Schools 
may direct. 

"Anthopometric examinations to be conducted by 
the director and his assistants, shall be limited to 
the following points: condition of eye-sight, heat- 
ing, teeth, breathing and heart-action. Whenever 
examination shows defective conditions in the 
above particulars on the part of a pupil, it shall be 
the duty of the teacher, the principal, or the ex- 
aminer making the examination, to report the same 
to the child's parents immediately, with the sug- 
gestion that the family physician be consulted at 
once, and the defect, if possible, remedied. In 
case the parents fail to consult the family physician, 
if action is not taken within a reasonable time, it 
shall be the duty of the teacher or principal in 
charge to so report to the director of the anthopo- 
metric laboratory, and if in his judgment the case 
in question is serious enough to warrant such 'ac- 
tion, it shall be his duty to co-operate with the 
parents to arrange to have the child attended to at 
one of the free clinics of the city, or by a physician 
from among those who may have volunteered their 
services for this purpose. 

"P>ut far more important than the work of the 
Board of Health and of the special laboratory for 
physical examinations is the health work of the 
teacher in the schoolroom. The results of the year 
have not caused us to change our opinion that the 
health officer who would most effectively safe- 
guard the wellbeing of the children must be on the 
ground all the time, and that this ever-present 
health officer is the teacher. She alone can keep 
the school room ventilated, and she alone can teach 
the children the cardinal physical virtues— to 
breathe and sit and stand and walk properly. Any- 
one who has seen the marvelous improvement 
which deep breathing exercises work in a school- 
room in even a short space of lime, will need no 
further evidence to convince him of the teacher's 
power to affect tie physical well-being of her pu- 



pils. 1 luring the year 1907 we purpose making 
sitting, standing, walking and breathing a special 
order of instruction, firmly convinced that in no 
other way can we he of so much service to the 
young." 

In conclusion Dr. Moore says: 

The excellent results of former years in the mat- 
ter of self-government have been more than main- 
tained. Pupils have responded to the imitation 
to adopt the honor system in a very hearty way. 
\\ e feel that we are making no mistake in providing 
abundant opportunities for the development of self- 
control among them. 

Much of the success of our work depends upon 
the co-operative attitude of the home. The home 
comes to the school periodically in the meetings of 
the Child Study Circle, which is an auxiliary of 
untold value to the school. To quote from the 
report of last year, "because of its existence school 
attendance is better, discipline is easier, lessons are 
learned more eagerly, and the best and most help- 
ful relations obtain between parents and teachers." 

Finally, it gives me no slight pleasure to testify 
publicly to the high character of the teaching staff 
and the administrative officials who have been my 
colleagues and helpers in the work of the year. Los 
Angeles does not have the opportunity which I have 
had to get acquainted with them. It is a privilege 
as well as a duty to assure you that a more loyal, 
devoted and able body of public servants has never 
anywhere been assembled than the company with 
which you have surrounded me in the work of the 
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Pacific Outlook 




By Sidney J. Dillon 

A Paper Read Before the City Club of Chicago 



Des Moines is a city of about 100,000 inhabitants. 
It is cosmopolitan, and I think we have all the vices 
and advantages that you have in the larger cities. ' We 
have the same problems to meet in our city government 
that you meet in Chicag'o. Here they are on a much 
larger scale. 

When this agitation for a new charter originated 
we did not have any crisis at hand. It was not a 
sporadic reform movement but came about because of 
the conviction on the part of the business men that 
there was general inefficiency and extravagance or 
wastefulness in our city government. To illustrate, 
we constructed a bridge last year across the Des 
Moines River, a very artistic affair, at a cost of $136,- 
000. When the bridge was completed it was found 
that the city did not own the approach on either side 
of the bridge. As a result the city was forced to pay 
a very exorbitant figure for that land. Later we 
moved another bridge. After the bridge had been 
taken down and they had started to move it, they 
found that they did not have the right of way. Once 
again the city was mulcted — and so on. I might give 
a dozen or more illustrations of how the city had 
wastefully used the money of the taxpayer. Of course, 
taken separately they did not constitute a great waste, 
but in the aggregate they amounted to a good deal, and 
we felt that in paying our taxes we were not receiving 
more than fifty cents on every dollar which we put 
into the- treasury. The result was, we appointed a com- 
mittee to draft a law. Last year that committee drafted 
the present Des Moines plan, which was passed by the 
legislature, and on the 20th of June was submitted to 
the people of our city and adopted. 

The framers of this law had four objects in view : 

F irst, we wished to put in this charter certain things 
which would prove an inducement to men of ability to 
seek political office, and we wished to eliminate as far 
as possible those things which l;ad previously kept 
good men from seeking office. 

The second purpose was that this charter should be 
adapted to the performance of the functions which a 
city government must perform. 

Third, we wished to allow the widest possible lati- 
tude for the councilmen's originality and creative work 
in governmental affairs. 

Fourth, we wanted our charter to represent the 
highest degree of popular control. 

First, now, in reference to securing able men. We 
first attempted to eliminate partisanship. We could 
not see that the question of a man's opinion on high 
tariff, or the Philippine policy, had any natural con- 
nection with his attitude as a city official. As a conse- 
quence we devised a non-partisan primary. This 
primary works in this manner. In order for a man 
to become a candidate he files his petition, signed by 
twenty-five electors if the city, who make affidavit to 
the fact that he is an elector and a man of good moral 
character. His name is then placed upon the primary 
ballot, in alphabetical order under the respective posi- 
tion to which he aspires. That is, if he is a candidate 
for councilman, it is placed under the heading of coun- 
cilmen and in alphabetical order. There is no party 



designation upon the ballot whatever. 

The primary is held, and two weeks later the elec- 
tion is held, only those standing highest on the pri- 
mary poll being voted for at the election. If, for in- 
stance, five men are candidates in the primary for 
mayor, we select from those five men the two men 
who have received the highest number of votes, and 
their names are placed on the election ballot. For the 
four other members of the council the eight men in 
the primary who received the highest number of votes 
have their names placed upon the ballot. That gives 
us two opportunities to weed out undesirable men — 
first at the primary, and second at the election. We 
feel that this measure will do away with the part)' 
fealty which has existed before, and by reason of 
which a Republican has voted for the Republican, irre- 
spective of the man's merit. These are the primary 
and the election features. They are our first expedi- 
ents for securing good men in office. 

Our second expedient was to provide better salaries. 
The mayor of the city of Des Moines today receives 
$2,500 and aldermen receive $250 a year each. Lhider 
this new plan the mayor receives $3,500, and each 
councilman $3,000. There are four councilmen and 
the one mayor. If the drafting committee could have 
increased these salaries they would have done so, but 
we did not feel that it was a practical possibility. We 
could not submit this charter to our people with a 
$10,000 salary attached to the office of mayor and a 
$5,000 salary attached to that of councilman. We 
would have done so if we had thought the charter 
would be adopted so. 

Our third expedient was the abolition of the ward 
lines. We found that we had aldermen wdio were re- 
turned to office because of a small coterie of men in 
their particular wards who exercised political influence 
there, were active, and on election day always got out 
all their votes. To eliminate such petty local bosses 
the charter abolishes ward lines and provides that the 
members of the city council must be elected at large. 
They must come before the citizens of the whole city 
and are all voted upon by every elector. 

Our fourth expedient for securing good men, was 
to allow them great latitude. Their powers are very 
broad and extensive. 

The second and third general objects of the framers 
of the charter were that it should be adapted to the 
functions which a city government must perform, and 
that it should afford scope for effective and creative 
work. A city government must pass certain ordi- 
nances in the nature of police regulations ; it must 
attend to public improvements, sidewalks, sewers, pub- 
lic building-s, etc. ; it must guard the public safety, 
through health, police and fire departments, and it 
must deal with public franchise privileges — which be- 
come valuable because of the increase of population. 
So far as we were able to judge, there was nothing 
in these functions which necessarily required a large 
number in the city council. No one of them is of a 
strictly governmental nature. They are mostly busi- 
ness propositions pure and simple. I went to our city 
council and looked up matters which came before it for 



Pacific Outlook 



13 



a period of three m mths. Three hundred and seventy 
matters came before this deliberative body. Three 
hundred and thirty of these had reference to contracts 
for improvements, and thirty-two were of a govern- 
mental nature, twenty of which were permits to 
it-. S.' I held that city government, at least the 
Des Moines city government, was more of a business 
proposition than it was a governmental proposition. 
Therefore, we attempted to frame this charter as you 

would organize a private busine giving the powers 

tn a small number of men. 

The fourth object was that there should he popular 
control. We felt that it was necessary, of course, that 
we have agents in carry on the government, hut we felt 
also that 'luring- their term of office the voice of the 
people should always he supreme upon all matters 
which came before that body of agents. Recognizing 
that authority was centralized, we prepared certain 
provisions in this law by which the people retain the 
balance of power. Having stated thus in suhstance 
the four objects of the Des Moines plan, I shall have 
now to go into details of the law itself. 

We elect four councihiien and a mayor, and for two 
years. The city government is divided into five depart- 
ments — the department of public affairs, the depart- 
ment of public accounts and finances, the department 
of public safety, the department of public streets and 
improvements, and the department of public property 
and parks. Into these divisions most of the work of 
the city will fall naturally, and these five men elected 
have entire charge of all of this work which falls 
within these five departments. 

To explain briefly wdiat this change means, let me 
sav that now we elect a mayor, eleven aldermen, a 
city attorney, a city treasurer, a city auditor, a city 
engineer, a city market master and half a dozen other 
minor employes. We propose instead to elect these 
fixe men. At their first meeting they take charge of 
these departments and assign the work of the city to 
their appropriate departments. The mayor is named 
as the superintendent of the department of public af- 
fairs. The council then names one of its number as 
the superintendent of each of the other departments. 
It is hoped that each will be named as superintendent 
for the department which he is best qualified to handle, 
either by reason of experience or training. So we 
shall have this body of councilmen, first acting as an 
executive body or governing board in charge oT the 
whole city, and then each individual member in charge 
of a particular department as superintendent. These 
men at their first meeting also appoint a city attorney, 
a city assessor, a city treasurer and all the other offi- 
cials whose work is administrative in character. These 
officials are not elected, they are appointed, and all 
subject at all times to the action of the board. If their 
work is satisfactory they will be retained. If not, 
they will he discharged. The reason for doing this 
was that the city, as I have said before, is a business 
proposition. We took a private corporation as a 
11 ii M lei. and modeled this board after the directorate 
board of a private corporation. 

The primary object we had in view was to centralize 
responsibility. An editor of our paper told this story 
on mir old government: It seems, a citizen of our 
city had been raising chickens in his basement. He 
had gone down to one of the public officials to com- 
plain and requested that some repairs be made in the 
sewer which had overflowed into his cellar. It had 
happened on several occasions and the chickens had 
been drowned, lie was referred to someone else, and 




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Pacific Outlook 



that someone else in turn referred him to some other 
department, and he was there referred on to still an- 
other one. until gradually he had gone through the 
entire city force and arrived back to the same man 
he started with. He said : "Pat, I have been all 
through the city departments now, every one of them. 
They have all referred me to someone else and I have 
come back here. All of them disclaim any responsi- 
bility. You have got to help me out." Pat says, ''I 
can't do it." "What then am I going to do?" said the 
man. "Well, by golly," says Pat, "I guess you'll have 
to raise ducks." 

That illustrates one of the great disadvantages we 
had with the old government. There was no responsi- 
bility. The city officials were perfectly independent. 
They did not care whether other departments were 
conducted on a business basis or not. They were only 
interested in their own departments, and as a result 
there was not that co-operation which is necessary for 
success in a city government as in a private enterprise. 
These five men have, therefore, been given all power 
— power to manage the affairs of the city, power of 
appointment, power of removal, when justified. 

A great many people, when this law was presented 
to them, practically threw up their hands in holy horror 
at the idea of centralizing so much authority. In fact 
during the campaign that was one of the greatest diffi- 
culties which we experienced. People said this was 
giving away their representative government, that it 
was creating a monarchy, that we were breaking down 
republican institutions generally, and all that. This 
was the favorite cry of the demagogue, and in order to 
obviate any such difficulty, and to prevent the building 
up of a political machine, we have several provisions 
in this law which are rather unique and which in a 
way make it the most radical city charter in America 
today. 

The first of these prohibits any man from working 
for the city who is interested in any contract in which 
the city is interested or who is interested in any public 
service corporation. In Des Moines the contrary 
practice has been a common abuse. Most of the candi- 
dates for aldermen have been contractors. After their 
election they were employed by the city railroad, or 
the gas company, or the water company. For instance, 
one of the men elected last year is a printer. Two days 
after he was elected the City Railroad Company sent 
over to him all of its printing. On many matters com- 
ing before the council the members were thus biased. 
As between the rights of the people and the rights of 
the corporation they naturally favored the corporation. 
This became material in taxation. Our city council 
acts as the Board of Review. The assessors would 
make a certain assessment on a public privilege. It 
would go to the Board of Review. The public service 
companies would go before that board, and the assess- 
ment would be reduced. That has been done time after 
time and year after year. The greater part of the 
taxation has fallen upon the small individual and the 
public service companies have escaped. Therefore, the 
law provides that no city hall employe shall be inter- 
ested in any contract to which the city is a party, nor 
in any contract to which a public service company is 
a party. 

The second provision requires civil service tests. 
When this council, this body of five men, meets first, 
they appoint a civil service commission of three men. 
This commission is appointed for six years, and natur- 
ally is removed from any political influence which 
might be wielded by the council. All the city hall em- 
ployes, with the exception of unskilled labor and the 




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Pacific Outlook 



15 



heads of tlii departments, the city attorney, citj treas- 
urer and city auditor, must pass a civil service exami- 
nation. These examinations arc prepared every spring 
ami from the list of candidates who come before the 
commission, the council is required to select their as- 
sistants, ami so lony as these men occupying clerical 
positions give satisfaction they can not be removed. 
If there is any misconduct or misbehavior a complaint 
must be filed with the civil service commission, and if 
found true the civil service commission will remove 
them. ( )therwise the city council has no power to act 
arbitrarily in discharging employes. We hope this will 
obviate any danger of patronage. The objection was 
raised that the council would build a machine by the 
officer which it could distribute, but this civil service 
idea, we believe will eliminate that danger. 

Third, publicity is provided for. It has been recog- 
nized by a great many public men that candidates for 
office should prepare a statement of their election ex- 
penses. We ought to know where their funds come 
from and for what they are expended. Therefore, this 
law requires every elective official, thirty days after he 
takes office, to publish in a daily paper of general circu- 
lation and to file in the city hall for public inspection, a 
detailed, itemized statement showing every dollar 
which he has expended during his campaign and show- 
ing from whom his campaign funds were received. 
We hope that in a measure this will eliminate the pub- 
lic service companies from their political activities. It 
is a fact in Des Moines that men have been elected to 
office time after time by the public service companies. 
On election day they had men at all the polling places 
working with might and main to defeat this plan. We 
hope it will accomplish something toward eliminating 
them. 

Every month the city council is required to prepare 
a statement of every dollar which it has received and 
every dollar which it has expended, showing' in detail 
just where the money came from and how it has been 
expended. These reports are given to the library, to 
the newspapers and filed in the office for inspection by 
any citizen. Once a year an examination is made of 
the books by expert accountants, and their reports are 
distributed in the same way. We believe that this 
publicity feature is one of the strongest features of 
our law. We believe that if the searchlight of public 
intelligence can be thrown on the city offices and we 
can find out exactly what our public officials are doing. 
we shall be able to keep them in line much better than 
we have been able to do heretofore. 

This brings me to the three provisions in the law 
which are known as the recall, the referendum and 
the initiative. As I said before, in drafting this law 
we had in mind the idea of keeping in the hands of the 
people the greatest possible popular control. We 
wanted something that would make the public officials 
responsible to the public will. We did not want them 
to ignore us. 

Let me give you an illustration. Our city railway 
company had a fight on tor a franchisse a year and a 
half ago. We had the case in the supreme court and 
expected to have the issue decided by our state supreme 
court. It was commonly reported that one of the 
attorneys of the company went to city hall and had 
a resolution passed ordering the tracks torn up. The 
next day the federal court granted an injunction. 
Judge McPherson of that court recently decided that 
the city railroad had a perpetual right to the streets of 
Des Moines. Now, we do not want that to occur 
again. If it does occur, we want some way U< get at 
these men and get at them quick. So this recall was 



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ing beauty of Orange, Walnut and Olive orchards 
in the valleys and snow-capped mountains form a 
picture never to be forgotten. $3.00 for a 166-mil^ 
trip, and you can stop over any place within eight 
days. $2.05 on Sunday, good to return that day. 
Get our free literature describing the "Kite". 

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Yosemite Valley 

Open to Tourists 

Winter Summer 

via 

Yosemite Valley Railroad 

Quick Scenic • Convenient 

Fare only $18.50 R° ur| d Trip 

FROM MERCED, CAL. 

Fine Vestibule Train Leaves Merced Daily at 2:30 p. m. 

See Yosemite this winter — nature's vast amphi- 
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For further information address 

H. H. Vincent, O. W. Lehmer. 

Gen'l. Agt„ 553 S. Spring, Traffic Mgr, 

Los Angeles, Cal. Merced, Cal. 



1G 



Pacific Outlook 



designed. If a man in office proves unsatisfactory, 
dishonest or incompetent, the citizens can prepare a 
petition, which must bear 25 per cent of the signatures 
of all the electors who voted at the last general election.. 
This petition states in a general way the charges that 
he is incompetent, inefficient, or dishonest. It is filed 
with the city clerk, verified, and a special election then 
called. Unless this official resigns, the name is placed 
rin the ballot with such other names as the citizens 
choose to put up. The election is held, and the man 
receiving the highest number of votes assumes office. 
This particular part of the law we got from Los 
Angeles, where it has been used once very effectively. 

The referendum is not altogether new in Iowa char- 
ters. We now have a law which requires that all fran- 
chises or special privileges in the public streets be sub- 
mitted to the people on a referendum. The Des Moines 
plan goes further. It requires that the people, upon 
filing a petition with this 25 per cent of the voters, 
may force the city council to submit to them any ordi- 
nance or resolution which it has passed — unless it be 
an emergency measure passed by a two-thirds vote — 
and the popular vote is decisive, and the city council 
cannot for a period of six months bring this same 
matter up again. We also have a referendum pro- 
vision that if a petition bearing 10 per cent of the 
voters' signatures is presented to the city council, they 
must hold up any ordinance or resolution which they 
are attempting to pass and submit the same to the 
people at the next general election. By these pro- 
visions we are hoping to retain an absolute control 
over the city officials. If they attempt to enter into a 
contract which does not meet with popular approval, 
it must be by ordinance, and a petition will stop it. If 
they pass a resolution, a petition will stop that. Let 
me illustrate: We are trying to improve the Des 
Moines river. They are going to expend some $320,- 
000 in doing it. The plans so far have been prepared 
in a very hasty manner. They are going to issue 
bonds, and I think it is the general consensus of 
opinion that the work has not been properly under- 
taken, that there will be a waste there of at least 85 
per cent. Now, if we had the law in force at this time 
we feel quite certain that that matter would be held 
up until all the people could pass upon it. 

The next provision is the initiative. By this pro- 
vision the people have the right to control legislation 
by preparing an ordinance and submitting the same 
on a petition signed by 25 per cent of the voters. The 
city council must, within twenty days, pass this ordi- 
nance without change, or must submit it to the people. 
If a majority of the people vote for the proposition, it 
at once becomes a law, and the city council cannot 
alter, amend or repeal it for a period of six months, 
when they may, if they so desire, re-submit it to 
the people. 

* * * 
Yosemite Splendors 

Photographer Boysen is in the Yosemite valley 
making a series of pictures of the fine winter 
effects for post card and other use. Now that the 
railroad has made winter access to the valley pos- 
sible for the tourist, this trip has become one of 
the wonderful experiences of a visit to California. 
Just at this season the fantastic ice formations 
about the roaring waterfalls, the icy domes glisten- 
ing in the winter sunshine and the cold solemnity of 
the forests combine to produce some of the most 
splendid winter effects anywhere within easy reach 
of civilization. 




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Pacific Outlook 



17 




SOCIOY 



On "Nothing a Year" 

That chapter in "Vanity Fair," where Thackeray 
tells how Becky Sharp ami her stupid husband man- 
aged to keep up appearances on "nothing a year." 
might have been written about any one of a fairly 
large class in Los Angeles society. And one would 
not need to call in a statistician to show there are more 
men of the description than women. The reason is 
very clear. A woman, to gain a foothold, must have 
a backing. She must have a family, friends and 
something must lie known of her past before she can 
make much headway in a social campaign. 

With a man it is different. Provided he has educa- 
tion, good manners and good clothes and can live at a 
nice hotel, it is very easy for him to work his way into 
the circles where he can enjoy all good things without 
incurring any obligations on his part. There are ever 
so many young men on limited salaries in this city, 
who dp this very thing. One of this sort is "Jack," — 
which is not his name at all — but "Jack" will do. He 
gets $75 a month in a clerical position in a railroad 
office down town. He belongs to a respectable family 
of moderate means somewhere in that big, indefinite 
locality known as "back east." He had two years at 
high school and one year at a business college. Com- 
ing to Los Angeles, he obtained this position as 
stenographer at $50 a month first, finally reaching the 
highwater point of $75. By every reason of birth, 
education and early environment and his present 
means. Jack ought to live rather plainly. It is not pre- 
supposed that a young- man can pattern very closely 
after James Hyde on $75 a month. But simplicity 
and plain, honest living do not appeal to Jack and the 
many others like him. He has a hankering to mingle 
with the elect, to be known as a "society man." 
Therefore he lives in a hotel, just as expensive as he 
can afford ; wears the most fashionable clothes, not 
forgetting the silk stockings which he buys by the 
half dozen pairs. He is so particular about details in 
grooming that he never fails to have his manicuring 
done often. By being very careful to cultivate the 
most useful of the persons he has met at the hotel, he 
gets frequent invitations to the homes of wealthy 
people and has now established himself so securely 
that he has quite a list of places where he is free to 
call informally on the daughters id' his hosts. Not 
very long ago, when the whole city was taken up with 
a brilliant charity entertainment at the Mason, "Jack" 
put a whole month's salary in a dress suit in the ex- 
pectation of being invited to join a box party given by 
the father of one "I his best girl friends. lie had one 
dress suit, but the coat was two inches too long in 
the back. Horrors! Jack did not receive the invita- 
tion but he has the suit, and he goes hopefully on 
taking his entertainment at other people's expense 
whenever it is offered. 

Obligations? The thought never enters his young 
head. Alter he has paid all the expense incidental to 
keeping an ambitious young clerk in the social whirl, 
he hasn't enough money left each month to buy a girl 
a bunch of violets — cheap as they are. 




Beauty was spread with a lavish hand for the 
debutante's reception given by Mr. and Mrs. Mark 
Sibley Severance at the Alexandria Wednesday after- 
noun to introduce formally their daughter, Miss Mar- 
ine, to Los Angeles society. The banquet hall on 
the second floor with its rich dark green tones, made 
a most harmonious setting for the masses of cut flow- 
ers and greenery banking pillars and wall. The 
choicest flowers of the season were in abundance, 
roses, carnations and violets overflowing vases and 
baskets, while here and there among them great clus- 
ters of Annunciation lilies lifted their fragrant chal- 
ices. The ceiling was scarcely visible through the 
thick ropes of asparagus plumosus caught from pillar 
to pillar and garlanded along the walls. The loveli- 
ness of all this floral beauty was further heightened 
by the rosy light shed by myriad tiny incandescents, 
half concealed in the greenery. 

In the evening a dancing party was given for the 
younger set. Mrs. Harriet Severance received with 
her mother and the ladies assisting were : Mesdames 
J. H. Johnson of Pasadena, Henry T. Lee, I. N. Van 
Nuys, Harvey Pattee of Riverside. James Roy Pink- 
ham, Jaro Von Schmidt, Alfred Solano, Epes Ran- 
dolph of Tucson. Ariz. ; John Boyd. William Curlett 
of San Francisco, and the Misses Susan Carpenter, 
Virginia Johnson, Georgina Jones of Santa Monica, 
Gertrude King, Mary Lee, Edith Maurice, Alary Lind- 
ley, Helen Newlin, Annis Van Nuys, Kate Van Nuys, 
Inez Ray, Fannie Rowan, Florence Rowan, Laura 
Solano, Caroline Trask, Louise Boyd and Ethel Cur- 
lett of San Francisco. 



Mrs. Carlisle's Series 

Mrs Lewis Clark Carlisle, 1202 South Alvarado 
street, gave a bridge party and buffet luncheon last 
Friday and a "500" party the day before, entertaining 
over 100 women at the two affairs. These were the 
second and third of a series Mrs. Carlisle is giving. 
the next to he held in February. The guests were: 
Mines. J. B. Grady, T. Hughes! Altie Hallett. W. L. 
Jones, George Goldsmith, Carl Kurtz. I. R. Kirkpat- 
rick. C. F, A. Last, John Murrietta, Lou Mitchell, E. 
C. Magauran. F. II. Nichols, Charles F. Noyes, W. 
W. Xeuer. Sidney J. Parsons. Potter. George Drake 
Ruddy. Abner L. Ross, W. E. Richardson, Davis 
Richardson. Leah Seeley, Stansbury, W. H. Smith, 
C. C. Tatum, James Garfield Warren, II. ]. Woolla- 
cott, M. T. Whitaker. John Carlyle Wilson, W. H. 
Reid, B. R. Baumgardt, C. J. Kubach, O. J. Barker, 
James Hellman, D. C. Lane. Leslie Hewitt. Louis 
Cole. A. C. Calkins. Wilbur D. Campbell. William 
James Chick. Willis Bootlie, B. Duncan. Philip Hu- 
bert. David Remick. Louis A. Denker, C. O. Stanton, 
Auguste Winstel, A. C. Fellows. J. A. Brown. Charles 
Burcham, I. W. Gardner, George E. Bittinger. Her- 
man II. Goldschmidt, and the Misses I. la Underbill, 
Vugusta Lamb. Jennie Henderson and Emma Harvey; 
Mrs. S. C. Bogart, Mrs. Richard V. Raw Mrs. Ed- 
ward C. Dieter. Mrs. ( '.. E. Burrall. Mrs. E. L. Doran, 



18 



Pacific Outlook 



Mrs. Benjamin F. Church, Mrs. Ralph W. Holmes, 
Mrs. J. T. Fitzgerald, Mrs. C. C. Gibbons, Mrs. I. 
Lester Hibbard, Mrs. Henderson Hayward, Mrs. W. 
L. Holling'sworth, Mrs. F. O. Johnson, Mrs. George 
Kress, Mrs. R. W. Kinsey, Mrs. J. L. Merrill, Mrs. C. 
B. Nichols, Mrs C. E. Payne, Mrs. W. F. Pleas, Mrs. 
Richard A. Perez, Mrs. Valentine Peyton, Mrs. 
Nicholas E. Rice, Mrs. Herbert Requa, Mrs. C. M. 
Seeley, Mrs. Edgar Lacy Swain, Mrs. F. H. Snowdeh, 
Mrs. C. E. Stoner, Mrs. George P. Thresher, Mrs. M. 
H. Thayer, Mrs. Stephen S. Wilder, Mrs. R. W. Vin- 
cent, Mrs. S. M. Goddard, Mrs. E. T. Pettigrew, Mrs. 
Reuben Shettler, Mrs. I. N. Peyton, Mrs. Edwin G. 
Howard, Mrs. Roth Hamilton, Mrs. Addie Lee Buck- 
ler and Mrs. Sumner P. Hunt. Mrs. Carlisle was 
assisted in the diningroom by Mrs. Henderson Hay- 
ward, Mrs. George P. Thresher and Mrs. Herbert 
Requa. The next of the series will be given in 
February. 



Miss Fagge Honored 

A large musicale was given Wednesday evening 
by Mrs. F. W. Norman of Fort Hill Villa, in honor 
of Miss Lalla Fagge, who returned Christmas from 




Miss Lalla Fagge 

Talented violinist, guest of honor at musicale Wednesday evening 

two years of violin study abroad. The preceding 
evening Miss Fagge was the soloist at the Ellis Club 
concert. She is a pupil of Cesor Thomson, Brussels, 
and August Wilhelmz, London. In London Miss 
Fagge gave a successful concert in Aeolian Hall, New 
Bond street, a few weeks before coming home, and 
received excellent press notices. Several of Mrs. Nor- 
man's guests participated in an informal programme. 
The invited guests were: The Rev. Dean and Mrs. 
Wilkins, the Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Trew, the Rev. Alfred 
and Mrs. Morton Smith, the Rev. Chas. T. and Mrs. 
Murphy, Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Kraus, Mr. and Mrs. 
Nicholl Lyon, Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Fonda, Mr. and 
Mrs. J. B. Poulin, Mrs. Blanche William Robinson, 
Mr. and Mrs. Julius Albert Jahn, Mr. and Mrs. Phillip 
Zoberlein, Mr. and Mrs. Harley Hamilton, Mr. and 
Mrs. Frank Colby, Mr. and Mrs. Howard Pratt, Mr. 
and Mrs. McStay, Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Drake Ruddy, 
Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Morgan, Mr. Geoffrey Morgan, 
Mr. and Mrs. James R. H. Wagner, Mr. and Mrs. T- 



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Pacific Outlook 



19 



L. Marygold, Mr. and Mrs. F. S. Doolittle, Dr. and 
Mrs. Tom Davidson, Mr. and Mrs. George Birkel, 
Mr. and Mrs. I-'. 11. Edwards, Mr. and Mrs. Nathan 
Weston, Mr. and Mrs. (.'has. Fox ami Miss Fox, Mr. 
and Mrs. Edward Sands. Mr. and Mrs. Whittaker, 
Mrs. Foy and the Misses Foy, Mr. and Mrs. Harcourt 
\\ ilson, Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Norman, Or. and Mrs. 
Stivers. Mr. and Mrs. E. 11. Spencer, Mr. and Mrs. 
John II. Folev : Madame Johnson Bishop, Miss Lorn-,. 
Nixon Hill. Miss O'Donoughue, Miss Elizabeth Car- 
rick. Miss Jennie Winston. Miss Beresford Joy. Miss 
Margaret Goetz, Miss Estelle lleartt. Miss C. L. 
Wills. Miss Ina Whittaker; Mr. R. and Miss L. Nor- 
man, Miss Myrtelle Decker, Mrs. Field, Miss Blanche 
Brocklebank, Miss Trew and Dr. Niel Trew, Miss 
Daisy Walters. Miss C. Mytton and Mr. Robert Myt- 
ton ; Messrs. (has. Howes. Rev. Waldo Chase, Archi- 
bald Sessions. Archibald Withers. Mr. Angell, Carl 
Von Breton, Maude, Gregory Perkins, Jr. 



Mexican Entertained 

At the regular dinner of the Serevance Club last 
Saturday night at the Westminster hotel, the mem- 
bers had the pleasure of listening to a talk on the 
people of Mexico by L. Gutierrez de Lara, the guest 
of honor. Mr. De Lara, who is a young man of high 
intellectuality, has occupied positions of honor under 
his government, having served four years in the diplo- 
matic corps. He came to this country on a mission of 
love for his people — to acquaint the outside world 
with social conditions in Mexico. In his eloquent ad- 
dress Mr. De Lara told of the misery of the masses 
in Mexico. "Ignorance, poverty and alcoholism are 
the greatest enemies of the poor people of Mexico. 
Greater opportunities for education and better eco- 
nomic conditions would restore them to a position of 
dignity and make them the equal of any nation." An 
animated discussion followed the address, in which 
Benjamin Fay Mills and Ella Wheeler Wilcox, who 
were also guests of the club, participated. Dr. John 
R. Haynes presided. 



Society Plays "Diavolo" 

"Diavolo," the new game invented to help amuse 
society, is becoming popular here among people of 
leisure. Mrs. J. C. Ferris, 1627 Ingraham street, en- 
tertained a party of friends with the latest diversion 
one day last week. She was assisted by the Baroness 
George Von Polenz. Prizes were awarded after the 
game, which was played on the lawn, and a buffet 
luncheon was served. The guests were : Miss Elsa 
Fuhrer, Miss Ethel Rebman, Miss May Rebman, Miss 
Lucy Fuhrer, Miss Adelaide Stanton, Miss S. Cave, 
Miss Wren, Miss Simpson. Miss Mamie Bradshaw, 
Mrs. F. T. Morgan, Mrs. Cfiarles White, Mrs. Mer- 
rier, Mrs. B. F. Ferris, Miss Jeanette McGee. Miss 
Grace Bradshaw, Mrs. Alfred Freemont, Mrs. H. S. 
Bradley and Miss Warren. 



Farewell Attentions 

Miss Flora Hunter, who has been the object of 
many social attentions since coming to visit with Mrs. 
William Wallace Mcl.eod of 1640 West Eighteenth 
street several months ago, will leave next Wednesday 
for her home in San Francisco. Tuesday Mrs. Mc- 
Leod gave a card party tor Miss Hunter: Friday she 
was the guest of honor at a card parry given by Miss 
Rixon of South Bonnie Brae street; Saturday Mrs. 
E. C. Rvan at the Bonsello will give a luncheon and 




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every conceivable circumstance of human suffering. 

The Pacific College of Osteopathy 

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Next term beginF January 28. Officers: J. O. Hunt, 
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Address the secretary for full information. Cor. Daly 
Street and Mission Road, Los Angeles, Cal. 



Salesmanship 

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20 



Pacific Outlook 



box party for her and Sunday evening Mrs. William 
Brewster- Smith of South Pasadena will give a dinner 
in her honor. At the card party Tuesday the hostess 
was assisted by Mrs. Arthur S. Barnard, Mrs. Herbert 
C. Stone, Miss Katherine Kemper and Miss Feriba 
McLeod. Other guests were: Mesdames Harriet S. 
Wright, E. C. Ryan, Charles Rixon, R. T. Perry, C. 
B. McKinney, T- Frank Bowen, Judson M. Davis, 
Harry K. Wheeler, L. H. Dutton, G. W. Randall, A. 
P. Chapin, L. H. Stahl, L. E. Wyckoff, C. H. Salinas, 
F. B. Silverwood, Orville Ewing, McDonegal, Elmer 
E. Gardner, H. W. Brundige, Spencer Brown, Grace 
Davie, W. H. Sutch, Harry A. Massey, Sidney Lee 
Grover, G. PI. Maginnis, J. F. Kanst, A. Alexander, 
Claude Kessler, Willis M. Dixon, D. A. Meekins, 
William E. Brewster-Smith, W. H. Morehouse, Misses 
Eugenia Rixon, May Flint, Lula Crawford and Helen 
Kemper. 



Good Shepherd 

The annual meeting of the auxiliary of the Home 
of the Good Shepherd, an institution which has for 
its aim the reclamation of wayward girls, was held 
last Monday, when the reports of the year's work were 
read and officers were elected. Madame Modjeska, 
who has followed the development of the work from 
the beginning with the deepest sympathy and interest, 
was elected honorary vice-president. A flourishing 
financial condition was shown by the treasurer's re- 
port, but a small part remaining to be paid of the 
$10,000 indebtedness incurred to build a laundry, 
when the home was first established in 1904. The 
other officers elected were Miss Susan Lynck, pres- 
ident ; Madame Ida Hancock, first vice-president ; 
Miss Marie Rose Mullen, financial secretary ; Mrs. 
P. G. Cotter, secretary and treasurer. 



Mrs. Richard V. Day of St. James Park gave a 
card party Monday afternoon in honor of her daugh- 
ters, Mrs. R. D. Bronson and Mrs. J. R. Powers. Miss 
Gretchen Day assisted her mother in receiving and 
entertaining. The guests were : Mrs. W. I. Hollings- 
worth, Mrs. Erasmus Wilson, Mrs. Frank King' Wil- 
son, Mrs. George W. Walker, Mrs. C. F. Perry, Mrs. 
Charles Modini-Wood, Mrs. W. H. Perry, Mrs. Annie 
Moore, Mrs. Samuel Lindley, Mrs. F. W. Braun, Mrs. 
W. W. Johnson, Mrs. M. E. Johnson, Mrs. S. M. God- 
dard, Mrs. George E. Burrall, Mrs. W. P. Dunham, 
Mrs. Matthew S. Robertson, Mrs. Charles McFarland, 
Mrs. Dan McFarland, Mrs. L. W. Powell, Mrs. Albert 
H, Busch, Mrs. R. J. Waters, Mrs. H. C. Gooding, 
Mrs. F. O. Johnson, Mrs. W. S. Cross, Mrs. Hender- 
son Playward, Mrs. John Saunders, Mrs. Lee W. 
Davis, Mrs. Crenshaw, Mrs. W. Carlisle Wilson, Mrs. 
S. J. Whittimore, Mrs. A. Darren, Mrs. Adams 
Spaulding, Mrs. Lewis Clarke Carlisle, Mrs. Carl 
Leonardt, Mrs. Walter Stone, Mrs. Carl Kurtz, Mrs. 
W. D. Storer, Mrs. W. S. Botsford, Mrs. Adele Ball, 
Mrs. Hugh Harrison, Mrs. Marion Gray, Mrs. F. H. 
Snowden, Mrs. A. Curtis of Portland, Miss Gertrude 
Gooding-, Miss Amy Leonardt, Miss Angel Miles, 
Miss Ethelwyn Walker, Miss Walker, Miss Genevieve 
Dowing, Miss Cope, Miss Evangeline Cope and Miss 
Amy Hellman. 

A large reception will be given Monday by the man- 
agement of the Lankershim in honor of Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert Wilcox, who will leave Wednesday for San 
Francisco, where they will embark the following' day 
for Honolulu. This will be the last of the many 





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Pacific Outlook 



21 



social affairs that have been given by friend- of the 
poet and playwright in Los Angeles. Mr. and Mrs. 
Wilcox have become so enamored with Southern ( ali 
fornia that they have decided to return here and make 
their home. Madame Severance. Mrs. Robert J. Bur- 
dette and Mr-. George Drake Ruddy will assist in 
receiving Monday. 

Mr. and Mr-. Valentine Peyton and Miss Edna 
Peyton have returned u> their home, 837 Westlake 
avenue, after a two-months' trip through the East. 
Mr. Peyton is prominently identified with different 
philanthropic organizations, and has been especially 
active <>n behalf of the McKinley Home for Boys, 
founded by the late Rev. Uriah Gregory. 

Miss Maud Williams, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
< ieorge II. \\ illiams, formerly of Denver, will be mar- 
ried Sunday to Jack L. Winn. The ceremony will 
be performed by Rev. Robt. J. Burdette of the Temple 
Baptist Church and will be a simple affair witnessed 
by the relatives and a few friends of the bride and 
groom only. 

W'ednesdav evening Miss Leila Holterhoff sang" for 
the Normal School ( dee Club at their concert given 
in honor of the midwinter class. The first part of the 
programme was a cantata. "The Lady of Shallot," in 
which the soprano solus were sung by the Misses Mae 
Crothers, Florence Schwarz and Helen Sevier. 

Miss Clara Condee, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. H. 
Conrlee, 1855 West Twenty-first street, and Walter 
A. Corbin were married Tuesday evening at the home 
of the bride. Rev. Alfred G. Fessenden performed 
the ceremony and the wedding music was furnished 
by the De Nubila orchestra. 

An Irish evening was given Friday night by the 
management of Hotel Alvarado. Nanno Woods of 
Hollywood, whose Irish impersonations are novel and 
delightful to Western audiences, was the chief attrac- 
tion. Mrs. Harry Dow Kirk, lyric soprano, sang sev- 
eral songs. 

Madame Zelie de Lussan and her husband. Signor 
Fornari, the well-known Italian pianist, will entertain 
a few friends at dinner Sunday. Stanley Josling, the 
noted miniature painter of London, Pandia Ralli and 
Jack Rubie will be their guests. 

Miss Mabel Horn, a society girl of St. Paul, wdio is 
visiting Mrs. J. J. "Melius and the Misses Melius of 
West Adams street, was the guest of honor at an in- 
formal bridge party given by Mrs. E. Avery McCarthy 
Monday afternoon. 

Miss Marguerite P. Moore, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Walter Moore, left last Saturday for a long visit 
with her sistter, Mrs. Paul Selby, of Johannesburg. 
South Africa. On the way she will visit relatives and 
friends in the East. 

Major and Mrs. Ren C. Truman gave a dinner 
Tuesday evening at their home on Pasadena avenue 
in honor of General and Mrs. Creenleaf. who passed 
through the city on their way from Coronado to San 
Francisco. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. Avery McCarthy gave a theater 
party Monday night, having as their guests Mr. and 
Mrs. Hancock Banning, Miss Louise Burke and Stan- 
ley Josling. the miniature painter of London. 

Mrs. tarter Harrison, wife of the former mayor of 
Chicago, is in Pasadena with other members of her 



family and her son, ( .our Harrison, Jr.. who is a 
delicate lad. This is tin third season the ( !arter I larri- 
sons have spent in Southern California For the benefit 
of his health. Mrs. Harrison is a writer of children's 
stories that are tu high favor with young readers. 

Mrs. George Goldsmith, who will leave next week 
on a tour of the Orpheum circuit, was the guest of 
honor at a little birthday surprises party given last 
week by Mrs. W. E. C. Meadows, of ('range Grove 
place. 

Dr. and Mrs. Lewis Morris of New York arrived 
in Los Angeles last Sunday and will remain through 
the winter. They are at the I lershey Arms. Mrs. 
Morris is the daughter of ex-Senator W. A. Clark. 

Mrs. Charles Wellington Rand left Tuesday night 
for the East, where she was called by the illness of 
her son, who had to leave his studies at Harvard to 
undergo an operation for appendicitis. 

Mrs. Thomas Lee Woolwine of 1040 Kensington 
Road gave a luncheon nad bridge party Friday in 
honor of Mr. Woolwine's sister, Mrs. Elton A. Her- 
rick of Grand Rapids. Mich. 

The engagement was recently announced of Miss 
Inez Ray, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. M. Ray, St. 
James Park, to Paul Weeks, the wedding to take place 
some time next month. 

Mrs. C. B. Shaller of 1816 Magnolia avenue is 
entertaining her niece, Mrs. Harry D. McConn, and 
the latter's daughter Julia, of Fort Madison, la. 

Mrs. F. E. Engstrum of 2407 Ellendale place 
give a large reception Wednesday in honor of Airs. 
Paul Engstrum, formerly Miss Ruth Anbury. 

Airs. Ida M. Thompson and her sister, Miss Alar- 
jorie Menifee, wdio recently returned from a year's 
travel in Europe, are staying at the Hershey Arms. 

Edgar H. Cline has returned to Berkeley after 
spending a short holiday with his parents. Air. and 
Airs. Ross C. Cline. 661 South L nion avenue. 

Airs. Hamilton Bowman Rollins and her daughter. 
Aliss Jane Rollins, who have been visiting in the 
East, arrived in the city Friday. 

Airs. E. Avery AlcCarthy will give a bridge whist 
party Monday in honor of her mother. Airs. A. J. 
I loward, 1540 Wilton place. 

The Alisses Estelle and Lottie Greenbaum, two fair 
maids from Baltimore, Aid., are visiting their sister, 
Mrs. A. Bernstein. 

A. P. Maginnis, tax commissioner for the Santa 
Fe, returned Tuesday from a two weeks' business trip 
in the East. 



Antique Mahogany Furniture 

Can be Bought at 

Lee L. Powers Antique Store 

AT COST. See his stock. 

612 South Broadway Los Angeles, Cal. 




Visitors are Cordially Invited 

AUDITORIUM 

5th and Olive Sts. 



PHOTOGRAPHER 



22 



Pacific Outlook 



AMONG THE WOMEN'S CLUBS 



Young Women's Association 

Members of the Young" Women's Christian Associ- 
ation listened Monday night to an interesting lecture 
by Russ Avery, who told of a recent trip trough 
the Sierra Nevadas. Mr. Avery is a member of the 
Sequoia Club, noted for its number of long and ardu- 
ous climbs made in the Coast Range. The speaker 
showed a number of fine stereopticon views during 
his talk. This lecture is one of the series of Monday- 
night entertainments given by the association as a 
membership privilege. Next Monday night Dr. 
Charles Browning will speak on "The Cause and Pre- 
vention of Tuberculosis." 

A number of social affairs will be given next week 
in connection with the closing of the first term of 
work in the educational department — a very successful 
term, bv the way. The English department, the larg- 
est in the association, gives a rally Saturday night of 
this week in which a programme of varied attractive- 
ness is to be the offering. Mrs. Dwight Rittenhouse 
Brown, Ph. D., director, and her assistant, Miss Lyde 
M. Abell, have charge of the arrangements. On Tues- 
day evening the mid--year educational reception will 
take place, when all the old members will be the 
hostesses to welcome the incoming members. A spe- 
cial entertainment on that evening will be the drill by 
the gymnasium classes, including the junior branches. 
On Friday night a big concert will be given by the 
combined orchestras and the choral club, under the 
direction of the respective leaders, Wm. E. Mead and 
Mrs. L. J. Selby. 

Miss Ludema Sayre, for a long time connected with 
the extension department here, has been called to 
Washington, D. C, by the national board to organize 
that branch of association work in the capital city. 

In the employment department great difficulty is 
experienced in finding places for the number of young 
women applying for work. The secretary is deluged 
with requests of this kind from many girls who have 
come here from the East in the expectation of finding 
work. It is the most serious problem the association 
has to dear with. 

The contractors have promised to have the new 
building on the corner of Third and Hill streets ready 
for occupancy by April. Its need is more and more 
pressing, as the present quarters are becoming too 
cramped to carry on the work planned by the directors. 



Ebell Club 

At the Monday meeting of the Ebell Club the 
happenings of the day were presented to the members 
under the leadership of Mrs. W. S. Bartlett and Mrs. 
Robert J. Burdette. History as it is being made in 
foreign countries was succinctly treated by Mrs. W. 
S. Bartlett, who spoke more particularly of the recent 
happenings in Persia, Abyssinia and Japan. Mrs. 
Burdette talked about the large political questions that 
are absorbing the attention of the American people 
today. The possible candidates for the presidency 
were the subject of some of her remarks, and the 
financial problems with some of the proposed remedies 
were gone into. Civics and sanitation, two matters 
dear to every club woman, were also touched upon. 
Mrs. Eliza Tupper Wilkes conducted the book review 
and discussed the latest works on metaphysics and the 
new fiction. Tea was served at the conclusion of the 



Political Equality Club 

Mrs. Elizabeth Baker Bohan will be the speaker at 
the meeting of the Los Angeles Political Equality Club 
at the Woman's Clubhouse, Saturday afternoon. Her 
subject will be "The Secret of the Finland Movement," 
and will deal with the success of feminism in that 
country, where the women have been admitted to the 
full exercise of the franchise. Mrs. Bohan is an au- 
thority on the woman question, having spent years in 
active campaigning in Wisconsin before coming to 
Los Angeles about ten years ago. She is prominent 
in the Badger Club and has given much of her ener- 
gies to the furthering of different philanthropic under- 
takings. The Saturday meeting will resolve into a 
farewell reception to Miss Wilhelmina Bain of New 
Zealand, who will leave in a few days for her far 
home. 



, Friday Morning 

The programme at the Friday Morning Club this 
week was in charge of the book committee. The fol- 
lowing recent books were discussed : "Fruit of the 
Tree," by Wharton ; "Basis of the New Civilization," 
by Patten; "Sex and Society," by Thomas; "Through 
the Eye of a Needle," by Howells, "The Saint," 
by Fogazarro ; "Joseph Vance," by De Morgan ; "The 
Man of the Property," Galsworthy ; "Father and Son," 
Anonymous, and "The Shuttle," Burnett. A musical 
treat will be the offering at the meeting next week 
when the programme will be presented by Thilo 
Becker, pianist, and Mrs. Becker, violinist. 



Ruskin Art 

Haden and Whistler in England, Jacquemart in 
France and other European exponents of the art of 
etching, were discussed Wednesday at the Ruskin 
Art Club, Mrs. T. F. Carhart and Mrs. J. F. Kanst 
leading. Next week Hector Alliott, the well-known 
art authority, will address the club^ his subject being, 
"Different Interpretations of the Engraver and the 
Etcher." 



Eagle Rock Club 

Mr. and Mrs. Godfrey Edwards of Royal Drive, 
Eagle Rock, entertained the Twentieth Century Wom- 
an's Club at cards Friday evening, Jan. 18. About 
seventy-five guests were present. The club is raising 
funds for the new clubhouse to be built in the near 
future. 



Averill Club 

The Averill Club met Friday at the home of Mrs. 
J. W. Henry, 1412 Burlington avenue. Miss Wilmer 
gave a talk on her travels through Norway, Sweden 
and Denmark, illustrated by views. 

* * * 

Winning Friends 

The Sundav afternoon meetings of the Prohibi- 
tion Union in Symphony hall, in the Blanchard 
building, are creating great interest among those 
who have been watching the progress of the cause 
of temperance in Los Angeles. Good speakers and 
good music are provided for 'each meeting. The 
local prohibitionists feel greatly encouraged over 
the outlook. It is a fact worthy of note that since 
these meetings were begun several men who have 
voted with one or the other great political party 
have announced that hereafter they will exercise 
their franchise in behalf of prohibition candidates. 






Pacific Outlook 



23 



UNDER THE SKYLIGHTS 



By Perez Field. 

Art is the exponent of man's consciousness. The 
purposes for which a beautiful objed is created may 
be base, but its beauty never can be. The motives of 
the artist may be of the vilest order, while he deftly 
twirls his potter's wheel and gracefully shapes his 
wine flagon, but nevertheless there remains a quality 
in his skill which has a touch of divine inspiration 
about it. It gives him a glimpse of a better world to 
which no contact with evil can quite blind him. Art 
redeems man from his attachment to material things 
in the same way that love changes the thunderbolts 
of his passion into the temperate dews and showers 
of affection and esteem. 

Xo man can be an artist who does not in some 
measure, express the best of himself, no matter how he 
fumbles with bis tools. Xo beauty can be all ignoble. 
This explains the incongruity in the careers of many 
painters and other men of genius. It is the romance 
of Bohemia to be able to touch pitch and not be wholly 
defiled. The Philistine seeks and proclaims Bohemia 
for the sake of its mire, which adheres to his clothes 
as readily as like finds and appraises like ; for as long 
as we are men, there must be some contumely in a 
perfect understanding of each other. 

A perception of beauty is an artist's mire-proof 
armor, while the suit of mail of the men of science 
is made up of an intellectual perception of things 
as they are. The latter is therefore puritanical, exas- 
perating and good, while the valiant artist is delig'ht- 
ful, debonair, and as good as he cares to be — and let 
us admit as good as we care to have him. Not his 
least merit is that he imparts a certain plausibility to 
our vices, on which we comment with serene glee to 
our cronies and of which we say nothing to those 
unhappy people whom we respect and whose society 
we seek but inwardly deprecate. 



Many of our artists carry the honor of interna- 
tional fame, says Ellen Dvvyer Donovan in the Jan- 
uary issue of Overland Monthly. Many more are 
on the high road to like achievement. The painters 
of the Pacific Coast are forging ahead with redou- 
bled efforts to again adorn the magnificent resi- 
dences and public buildings in course of construc- 
tion in San Francisco, as well as to supply works of 
art to the lordly halls of the continental and trans- 
continental palaces. It is impossible to enumerate 
all worthy works in a series of magazine articles. 
but mention of a few will not be out of place. The 
sketch given of Emil Zola in Overland was taken 
from life when Xavier Martinez of Piedmont, Cal., 
was studying in Paris. It was considered excellent 
by the art colony there. Tn the I 'aris Exposition 
of 1900, rliree works from the brush of Martinez 
were accepted, which fact speaks more than a pass- 
ing note when we consider that the canvases of 
mam oilier able men were rejected. Miss Gertrude 
Partington's "The Joy Pan." a salon painting which 
hung in the favored Champs de Mars, is surely one 
of the finest things accomplished by our Pacific 
Coast artists. Miss Partington is a San Francisco 
girl. Of the painters who began a career in San 
Francisco and who have since won name and fame, 
none, probably, stands mil more prominently before 
the world than Jules Pages, who was recently here 
among the haunts of his boyhood. "Les Convives," 



one of his best productions, was bought by the 
French government. Ii came to life while Pages 
was in Belgium waiting for dry weather to do the 
OUt-of-door work he contemplated. In his idle hours 
he frequented a cabarat, and a happy inspiration 
seized him to put on canvas the strong group as he- 
saw it. Then there is William Keith, a figure ven- 
erable, undemonstrative, yet alert. Lord Alfred 
Fast, the celebrated painter, said of Keith: "A grand 
old man, a genius, who would have received recog- 
nition and encouragement had he exhibited in Eu- 
rope, 'whereas the product of a new country must 
needs be dead a hundred years before that country 
would awaken to the fact that she produced him." 
In William Keith's studio are to be found the gran- 
ite walls of the Yosemite, towering in their mighty 
strength of countless ages. Here also are to be 
found the high Sierras, snow-clad and imposing, re- 
lleeting the beautiful opalescent tints to which the 
declining sun gives life. Then, too, Keith's pastoral 




"Peasant Woman, Moret" 

By John H. Rich 

scenes bring a quickening throb to the heart, while 
the eye is animated with delight. 

In truth. Pacific Coast painters possess their own 
individuality; they are inspired by the beauty, gran- 
deur and bigness of things around them. They 
draw their inspiration from great mountain ranges, 
noble rivers, vast valleys, forests, lakes and plains 
and awesome desert reaches. 

The canvases are full of the dying note of the 
Redman. Cowboy, Bronco Buster and of a certain 
per cent of one of the greatest civilizations the 
world has ever known. A civilization that speaks 
from the tiled roofs of decaying casas and iglesias. 
These and a thousand other attractions make this 
a unique held for the palette and brush. 

A dozen or more water colors by Miss Alice M. 
Dutton have lately been displayed at Kanst's art 
lerv. Miss Dutton lives in Winchester. Mass.. and 
has shown her pictures in several of the Xew Eng- 
land galleries. "Path Leading to the Fountain" is a 
charming bit of color, full of spontaneity, where the 



24 



Pacific Outlook 



luxuriant flowers seem to burst through the formal 
barriers of balustrade and wall, a veritable overcom- 
ing of man's combining by gladsome bloom and in- 
sinuating vine. "Garden, Beverly Farms, Mass." is 
a glimpse into the woods beyond a mass of bright red 
flowers. The contract between the sunlight and shade 
is well handled. All of the garden sketches are at- 
tractive. Water color as a medium of expression is 
receiving more serious attention than formerly. The 
result is naturally a great improvement in quality and 
force in recent paintings of this sort. 



what one does not think, well, 
blest. 



For this may he be 



One of the most important private sales held in this 
part of the world in a long time is taking place at 
the Hotel Maryland in Pasadena. The collection is 
being put in place this week and is now open to the 
public. The objects are displayed partly in the ball- 
room of the hotel and partly on the third floor. There 
are some old pictures, carved ivory, glass, Dresden 
ware, and silver plate, the greater part of which has 
been imported from Germany and elsewhere. There 
are many curious objects in this collection which will 
well repay a visit to our neighboring city. There are 
a couple of old Gobelin tapestries of quaint design and 
color. A fuller notice of the pictures will be given 
next week. 



Miss Mary Stewart Dunlap has an exhibition of her 
pictures at 318 West Third street. Although Miss 
Dunlap's technical skill is not great, her work may be 
considered as an example of "art for art's sake," a 
point of view which is always unsatisfactory. Like 
so many people of talent of the day she paints appar- 
ently because she knows how rather than because she 
ought. This is a quite harmless practice if under- 
stood. As 'far as she goes Miss Dunlap is a realist. 
She tries to show nature as it is rather than as it might 
be and is, to inspired eyes. Her work would un- 
doubtedly have a decorative effect in shadowy do- 
mestic corners, a value which has been perceived al- 
ready by a number of purchasers. 



"On Art' and Artists" is a book by Max Nordau 
which has lately been translated. Among- other things 
he says : "Art for art's sake — the art which is prac- 
ticed purely for the relief and satisfaction of the artist 
— is that of the cave man of the quaternary period." 
And again : "The contempt of Bougereau is the be- 
ginning of wisdom; if no Parisian artist finds pur- 
chasers, the big' pork butcher of Chicago, that paint- 
ers' providence, to whom in despair they turn their 
countenances, always has gold for Bougereau. * * * 
The 'Chat Noir' treats Bougereau as a buffon, but the 
Academy erects altars to him. Criticism scoffs, but 
America pays." 



We reproduce this week a picture by John H. Rich 
Called "Peasant Woman, Moret." The composition 
of this picture is good and the coloring subdued. 
Mr. Rich's exhibition at Pasadena closes this week. 

Jules Pages, whose pictures were so much admired 
here last winter, will be here again this year and show 
some of his pictures at Steckel's gallery. The work 
of this artist is so strong and full of spirit that it can- 
not fail to attract attention anywhere. 

The exhibition of Martin J. Jackson begins at 
Steckel's gallery Saturday and will continue two 
weeks. 

E. R. Ames gave an exhibition of miniatures at the 
Woman's Club on Tuesday last at the usual after- 
noon tea. 

Elmer Wachtel will hold an exhibition of his paint- 
ings in Blanchard gallery, beginning March IS. Mrs. 
Watchtel will show her water colors in Stechel's gal- 
lery the first fortnight in March. These capable art- 
ists passed their vacation in Temescal canyon, at La 
Jolla, and on the Malibu ranch. From each of these 
regions, so diversified in character, they have brought 
many sketches. Some of the pictures which have 
recently been finished may be seen at their sidehill 
studio on Avenue 43 Sunday afternoons, when 
Mr. and Mrs. Wachtel are glad to see visitors. 

Last week William Wendt made an excursion to the 
Provendencia Ranch to see some of the venerable oaks 
which skirt the Los Angeles river there. His studio 
at 2814 N. Sichel street is open to visitors Sunday 
afternoons. 

Leonard Lester, who is now in Cuba, has lately 
been ill near Santiago, where he went in. search of 
material for his painting. 

R. H. Mohler opened an exhibition of his pictures at 
the Baker-Wuest art gallery in South Pasadena 
Wednesday last. Mr. Mohler's study of nature seems 
cursory. His coloring' is brilliant and fanciful. What 
value his pictures have is a sentimental one. He will 
lecture before the Rembrandt Art Club, giving six 
lectures, the first taking place January 31 in the High 
School Auditorium. 



Art Briefs 

Nordau's characterization of Rodin is more curious 
than just. Pie says of him : "What has raised Rodin 
to an article of faith among the degenerates are three 
peculiarities. First, the choice of his subjects, which 
appeals to the mysticism and sensual psychopathy of 
his bodyguard of degenerates ; secondly, his technique, 
which deviates from tradition in childish, would-be 
original whims : and thirdly, his mistaking the natural 
limitations of his art, which he wants to -make say 
things for which sculpture possesses no means of ex- 
pression." Nordau has the happy faculty of saying 



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Pacific Outlook 



25 




The Mechanical in Drama 



The claim often advanced that ''The Holy City" 
is a great play may be easily disputed. Even in com- 
parison with its own particular kind of drama, the 
spectacular, classic-melodramatic sort, it seems over- 
strained, too mechanical. It has not the whelming 
sequence nor the virility nor the finely organized 
scenes of, for instance, "The Sign of the Cross." It 
has one strong, human character rising distinctly from 
among its many insignificant ones — the character of 
Mary -Magdalene, around which the play is built — but 
even her part is made overtheatrical in the average 
production by a constant application of mechanical 
effects. This principal figure is so immersed in spot- 
lights and so pursued about the stage by sudden shafts 
of calcium radiance and unexpected descents of dark- 
ness that it is with difficulty that the mechanical dis- 
tractions are penetrated by the onlooker and the real 
art which the actress may be giving forth beneath 
them uncovered and understood. 

Without a woman of the magnetic temperament and 
an artist of the power of Miss Stone in the role of the 
Magdalene, the only lasting impression to be had 
from "The Holy City," produced this week at the 
Auditorium, would be an impression of wonderful 
stag'e mechanics. But Miss Stone's vital personality, 
womanly intuition and artistic control — and express- 
ing all these, a wondrous voice, modulated to every 
feminine wile and emotion — defy the garish theatrics 
of the electrician and create a splendidly human imper- 
sonation in spite of these artificial distractions. Up to 
a certain point the cleverness of the stage electrician 
always is a distinct and delightful aid to the art of 
the actor and the playwright ; but when a drama is 
made to depend more on the mechanically spectacular 
than on the force of its characters, that point is passed. 

There are infinite possibilities in the theme of "The 
Holy City." Infinite they are. without exaggeration, 
for it is only an infinite alchemy that can resolve the 
gorgeous sin-red .Magdalene who is first pictured h ild- 
ing court on her housetop, to the lowly pure white 
Alary prostrate before the Tomb in the garden of 
Joseph of Arimathea; and with what agonizing power 
Miss Stone depicts the process of this transformation 
— the supreme travail of this woman who was scarlet. 
in those tense moments in the second act when the 
Magdalene, after being scorned and denounced by 
Peter, receives, at that instant of her bitterest humili- 
ation, the message from Him to pass to His presence 
in the inner room, and an agony of emotions, fear, 
shame, hope, the clutch of her revolting past and the 
yearning for purification, stagger her as she edges. 
trembling, into the Master's presence, and is heard, 
but not seen, sobbing at I lis feet — this fine passage 
already is too well known to Los Angeles audiences 
to warrant further mention. 

There is one act — the third, showing the Hall of 
Judgment — which is finely managed and is very effect- 



ive as a whole. The mob, shrieking "Crucify Him," 
as Pilate, well-intentioned but weak-willed, hesitates, 
is nicely handled; and here Frank Beamish as Caia- 
phas, the Jewish highpriest, makes a good impression, 
proving himself the most prominent male figure of the 
production. David Edwin gives an intelligent inter- 
pretation of Pilate. 

Joseph Kilgour is mightily handsome as Barabbas, 
but his performance follows a dead flat lever through- 
out. He gives the impression of being about as pas- 
sionately in love with the beautiful wanton of Mag- 
dala as an automaton would be, and uses his arms like 
semaphores. Kilgour enters into some parts delight- 
fully, and with others he does not seem to be able to 
become even moderately friendly. 

Harry Von Meter is surprisingly dignified and im- 
pressive in his small part of the Disciple John; but 
the rest of the male parts are commonplace. 

Rita L. Knight as Martha misses some of the most 
direct touches in the play. Where Martha is supposed 
to recognize her erring sister, the Magdalene, in the 
courtyard of Lazarus' house in Jerusalem, this actress 
lets the opportunity of the moment escape her entirely. 

Florence Darker, invariably pleasing in the small 
parts which have been accorded her at the Auditorium, 
appears as the boy Micah, a young Jew. 

The scenery of this production is effective ; and not 
a small part of the enjoyment of the Ferris week has 
been the performance on the great organ by William 
Edson Strobridge of the "Offertoire de Ste. Cecile," 
played between the third and fourth acts. 



The return of the veteran actor, George W. Bar- 
nuni. to the local stage is an event of real importance 
to the theatergoers of Los Angeles. He is a player of 
such subtle talents, wide experience and pleasing per- 
sonality that his presence with us lends a distinguish- 
ing touch to Lis Angeles dramatics. 

While "The Education of Mr. I'ipp." the modern 
comedy chosen as the medium for Mr. Barnum's re- 
appearance with the Belasco forces here, is built on a 
verv fiimsv dramatic framework, the quaint Barnum 
art is of such a silky-line texture as t> > conceal the 
weakness of the play under a close-woven web of de- 
lightfully human sympathies and smiles. The humor 
of the little man is so completely successful, so infec- 
tious, that he need only to walk across the stage — or 
climb a staircase, as he has done so masterfully each 
night this week in the first act of "Mr. Pipp" — and 
the audience immediately understands and loves him. 

Three characterizations in the current Belasi 
duction stand out with artistic distinction. Mr. I'.ar- 
num's "Mr. I'ipp" is. of course, pre-eminent. Xext 
in worth is the impersonation of Mrs. Pipp by Eleanor 
Carey. She looks ami enacts this part of the nouveau 
riche, garrulous, foreign-nobility-worshipping Amer- 
ican matron most successfully. After these two. the 



26 



Pacific Outlook 



Compte de la Charmarot of William Yearance is nota- 
ble for its effectiveness. 

The remainder of the characters have comparatively 
little to do except to offer an excuse by their presence 
at various times in different predicaments for 
the development of the three principal parts above 
named. It may be said, however, that though the bulk 
of the Belasco players have little individual oppor- 
tunity while their association with Mr. Pipp lasts, the 
collective intelligence of the majority of them g-ives 
tone and background to the foremost figures. 

Lewis Stone is seen as Gerald Fitzg-erald, the young 
English nobleman who, on account of family financial 
difficulties, has sought to earn a living in America as 
a driving master, and there learns to love Julia, the 
eldest daughter of dear little old Mr. Pipp, and big, 
bullying Mrs. Pipp ; Richard Vivian plays the part of 
John VVilling' and Harry Glazier that of the Due de la 
Touraine. John Daly Murphy, who has a genius for 
make-up and a sort of a "song without words" way 
of making - )'ou feel his parts, looks very amusing in 
the role of Congressman Firkin. 

Miss Emmet and Florence Smythe appear as the 
Misses Pipp. While they hardly can be called "Gib- 
son" types, they are pleasing in the colorless roles of 
Julia and Ida. 

Augustus Thomas wove the character-comedy, 
"The Education of Mr. Pipp," around the characters 
suggested by Charles Dana Gibson in his series of 
drawings of, "Mr. and Mrs. Pipp" and "the girjs." As 
a play it is a mere skeleton ; but the skeleton is de- 
lightfully fleshed by Mr. Barnum's art and the intel- 
ligent support which he is given in the current pro- 
duction. 



The ultimate joy of the averag'e American heart is 
realized in "A Square Deal" — a skin-close election con- 
test between two rival political candidates, one repre- 
senting the independent and the other the "machine" 
element of the countryside, the returns from other dis- 
tricts coming into the village store over the wire, 
first one man ahead and then the other — with the 
honest man finally winner by a handful ! Such is 
the climax of the week's comedy drama at the Bur- 
bank. The third act of this play of rural Kansas 
might be termed an epitome of the unadulterated 
American spirit — the spirit of the genuine American 
who, good and bad combined, still rules the republic. 

Hannibal Hawkins, "citizen of Gridley, Kansas, 
U. S. A.," and David Wordley, "political boss of 
Gridley," are representatives of the most typical of 
American types ; they are the undiluted spirit of the 
people. To any foreigner conversant with the Eng- 
lish language, attendance on a performance of "A 
Square Deal" should be an illuminating experience. 
The candor of the contestants, who bluff out the 
most exciting sort of a ballot battle face to face, josh- 
ing and haranguing away the momentous hours with- 
out a thoug'ht of armed duel or physical revolution, 
whichever way the victory may chance to fall in the 
end, alone should be a valuable lesson in American- 
ism. 

The play may not be a great one, measured by the 
super-correct standards of dramatic art — and yet it 
accomplishes its purpose, it carries its point, which 
makes it greater in the sane estimation of theaverage 
audience than any play of the highest polish. The 
person at large — the dominant commoner — looks for 
results when he goes to the theater ; he wants to see 
himself, his predilections, the commonest impulses of 



The AUDITORIUM 

"Theatre Beautiful" 


SPARKS M. BERRY, Manager 
5th and Olive Sts. 




For Another Tremendous Week 






The FERRIS STOCK COMPANY 






with 








FLORENCE 


STONE 




Offers the Greatest of all Hi 


ts on the Western Stage 


63 


6e Hoi 


y Cif 


y 


Now 


Entering its Seventh 
Crowds Cannot be 


Week, and Still 
Accommodated 


the 


Prices: 


10, 25, 35 and 50 cents. 

Phones: F 2367, 


Matinees: 10 and 25 cents 
Main 5186 



SIMPSON'S AUDITORIUM 

L. E. Behymer, Manager 

Return Recital 

Saturday Afternoon, Feb. ist, 2:15 o'clock 

ADELA VERNE 

THE GREAT PIANISTE 
In a wonderful program of piano music 



Prices 50, 75, $1.00, $1.50, $2.00 



Seats now selling at Bartlett Music 1C0. 




All the best 

I N STR LMENTS 

For Band or Orchestra 

The only Collection of Fine Old Violins in the West 

Easy payments if desired 

113 South Spring Street 



Have Yott 

Attended our Great Holiday Factory Sale of Pianos 

Free Music Scholarship 

Discounts from our Factory Prices 
Sale Closes December 14 

D. H. BALDWIN ®> CO. 



The Auditorium 



431 W. Fifth St, 



Pacific Outlook 



27 



his kind, mirrored so faithfully on the stage that he 
may recognize them with a knowing smile, or a quick- 
ening of the pulse, or a frown of self-disapproval — 

it matters not what. SO 1< >n^ as the stroke rings true. 
It is the familiar sound he wants to hear, lie hears 
it in "A Square Deal," and even though his own 
]x>litiea! immoralities are the very cause of the lesson 
which is aimed at him, he spontaneously applauds 
the triumph of right, nevertheless. 

In the Burbank production of this characteristically 
American character play, William Desmond imper- 
sonates the Kansas village hem. Hannibal Hawkins, 
ami in so doing gives the audience a good measure of 
satisfaction. Hannibal's unscrupulous opponent, 
David Wordley, political boss, is quite effectively 
delineated by A. Byron Beasley. Henry Stockbridge's 
drollery in the part of Phileas Judson, Hannibal's 
loyal if a bit eccentric secretary, is a distinctive feat- 
ure. John \Y. Burton as Sam, the irrepressible hus- 
band of Maria Jones, has his usual success in produc- 
ing" lively fun. 

Miss Hall takes advantage of what small dramatic 
opportunities are offered by the part of Ruth Leigh- 
ton, village school teacher and inspiration of Hanni- 
bal Hawkins. 



Again the irresistible little Daphne Pollard carries 
off the week's honors at the Los Angeles Theater. So 
delightfully piquant a young lady as this pretty bit of 
a person seldom has been seen on the local stage. As 
a comedienne of the original sort she so far has been 
fully equal to the opportunities that have come her 
way during the present season of the San Francisco 
Opera Company at the Los Angeles. 

"Dolly Varden" is the current bill at this playhouse. 
It is a pleasing little comic "opera." This setting- 
gives quaint little Miss Pollard the best opportunity 
she has had here of displaying her cunning ways. 
Kunningham and Kunkel are the male favorites of the 
cast, as usual. The production is well staged. 

L. B. 



A Plea for Uplift 

Kitty Cheatham, writing on "Optimism the Ulti- 
mate in Dramatic Art" in the January "Critic," says 
in part : 

"In the world of art (I speak particularly of the 
theater and of the artist whose field is audible ex- 
pression), we reach a greater number of people than 
the clergy, who are supposed to be our eithical 
teachers. Granting for argument that good and evil 
are both potent forces. (Personally I believe only 
in one dominant force — good.) If we have an in- 
sistence in our individual messages, in the quality 
of our work, upon the things which are helpful, 
which are uplifting and beautiful, which send our 
audiences away with an added sense of courage, of 
hope in the reality of 'whatsoever things are true, 
whatsoever things are pure' — have we not fulfilled 
tlu- highest mission of art, the highest we know, and 
consequently can express, which is Truth? As an 
apt illustration of this, some months ago I sat in a 
box at the Academy of Music for the last perform- 
ance in New York of Charles Klein's play. 'The 
Music Master.' The vast theater was packed, people 
standing when it was possible; in the box with me 
were very conservative Xew England people, to 
whom obvious display of emotion was (from tradi- 
tion and education) not admirable or desirable. 



lining sicn the pla) before, I sat where I could 
watch both the actors and the audience. Briefly, 1 
can never forget that night, with its valuable ex- 
perience as proof of what I have just said, apropos 
of plays whose intent is for good. Not only my 
friends, lint the great audience were as one in their 
breathless attention and expression of sympathy for 
the experience of the "Music Master" (so exqui- 
sitely and delicately played by David W'artield, with 
the subtlety and simplicity of his art), which might 
be the experience of any man present, and the domi- 
nant motive, a mighty, unselfish love, capable of the 
highest expression, in a great sacrifice. As we 
were leaving the theater I heard a man (who was 
very material as to externals) say : 'Gee ! what a 
happy fellow that man Warfield ought to be to make 
another fellow feel like that !' and as we drove home 
my New England friends were silent, and finally 
one said : 'It has been a wonderful evening and I 
am glad that I came' ; and who that has seen it will 
ever forget the touching scene in Rachel Crothers' 
play, 'The Three of Us,' between the big sister and 
the younger, impulsive, wayward brother, and the 
result? The girl, with her love and tact, making 
him feel that she understood why, through false 
conditions and mistaken impulses, he had been 
tempted to do wrong, and, best of all, the triumph 
of her appeal to his better nature, when she made 
him feel and know that he was needed to protect 
her, his 'big sis.' The breakdown of the barrier of 
bitterness and misery, the sobbing of a big boy, and 
the birth of the real man, because it was 'a great 
thing for a fellow to be still believed in, even if he 
has been wicked.' And then dear 'Peter Pan'! Do 
you think there can be a happier woman on the 
stage than sweet Maude Adams? The man who 
does not enjoy 'Peter Pan' wants to look out for 
himself! 

"Speaking of my own work, especially of my be- 
loved children, I consider my choicest possessions 
to be two big bundles of letters from little folk and 
some' children 'nearing the friendly marks of age,' 
all children at heart, for they tell me that I have 
made them happy. So I am deeply grateful that it 
was I who was to find this infinitely lovely field of 
childhood for the expression of my art. for was not 
the greatest lesson taught us by the greatest Teach- 
er, 'Except ye become as little children '?" 



Theatre Notes 

As was expected, "The Holy City" will continue in- 
to its second week at the Auditorium, beginning Mon- 
day. Jan. 27. The great five weeks run of the same 
Ferris production last season bids fair, the manage- 
ment says, to be repeated this year. The scenic effects 
were handled with exceptional smoothness during the 
week, under the personal charge of Dick Ferris. An 
especially attractive feature which will be continued 
throughout the run is the solo performed by William 
Edson Strobridge on the great pipe organ. 

The farce, "Are You a Mason?" will be next week's 
bill at the Burbank. 

Nearly all the prominent actors on David Belasco's 
staff are western. David Warfield. Blanche Itates 
and J. H. Benrimo are Californians, Frank Keenan 
and John W. Cope are natives of Iowa, but Frances 
Starr is from the upper New York state and Charlotte 
Walker is a southern girl. 

"Commencement Days." a play of girls' college life, 



28 



Pacific Outlook 



will have its first production on any stage at the 
Belasco next week. The authors are Virginia Frame 
and Margaret Mayo. Miss Mayo is well known as 
the author of "The Jungle," and "Polly of the Circus." 
With the last named play, now running at the Liberty, 
in New York, with Mabel Taliaferro in the title role, 
this writer has scored one of the distinct successes of 
the season. It is expected that she will be here to wit- 
ness the premiere of "Commencement Days." 



which is, for a real musician, uninteresting and tire- 
some. 

Mrs. Witherspoon acted as accompanist skillfully 
and followed closely the spirit of the singer. 



Recent Musical Events 

Adela Yerne introduced herself to the Los Angeles 
public in a recital Thursday night Jan. 16 at Simpson 
Auditorium, and proved herself on that occasion a 
pianist of the highest order. 

In possession of a faultless technique, combined 
with a super-human strength and a health)' musical 
sense which is entirely free from sentimentality, she 
interprets the great masters in their real spirit and 
character, demonstrating herself as an artist of taste 
and true judgment. 

Her power and endurance are simply astonishing 
and never before has the Los Angeles public had occa- 
sion to witness these qualities to such an extent. It is 
hardly possible to believe that any pianist, and certain- 
ly not any woman pianist, ever would be able to sur- 
pass Adela Verne in the force and endurance which 
she displayed in the latter part of her programme, fin- 
ishing it with the Wedding March by Mendelssohn- 
Liszt and playing as an encore Liszt's Second Rhap- 
sody, executing both with a finish and style, a power 
and technique which electrified the audience. 

During the whole programme Adela Verne held her 
audience spellbound through her skill and ability to 
interest and astonish. 

One of the morning papers described Miss Verne's 
ability as ''pleasing work," but knowing that this par- 
ticular paper lends sometimes its pen to people whose 
musical ideas are neither cultured nor developed 
enough to criticise musicians of Adela Verne's repu- 
tation, it would be rather cruel to take such criticism 
seriously. 

Adela Verne is not "an English pianist," she is "the" 
English pianist, considered and recognized as such 
everywhere she has appeared. 



Simpson Auditorium was filled Monday, Jan. 20, at 
Herbert Witherspoon's postponed song recital. In 
spite of the fact that Mr. Witherspoon's style of inter- 
pretation is the cause of dispute, which was not ex- 
pected after his debut in the Symphony concert, the 
crowd was very enthusiastic and appreciative. An 
artist of Mr. Witherspoon's ability should reject 
effects which only mediocre artists use to cover their 
faults. Mr. Witherspoon, for instance, misuses the 
consonants for a morendo of a note which is bad 
method. He does not need to interpret Wagner, 
Schubert or Schumann with riterdandos or fermatos 
which are not written and do not exist. He should 
try to execute them in their simple style, as Schubert 
and Schumann are only great in their simplicity. Any 
musician trying to improve on them shows bad taste. 

Wagners "Abendstern" Mr. Witherspoon rendered 
with such an abundance of sentimentality as would 
have honored a singer of Latin descent. From an 
Anglo-Saxon mouth more healthful musical sense was 
to have been expected. And so was the whole pro- 
gramme dominated by this style of interpretation, 



The season's second concert of the Ellis Club 
took place at Simpson Auditorium Tuesday even- 
ing Jan. 21 under the direction of Mr. Poulin. The 
club is well balanced and Mr. Poulin's intelligent 
leadership draws the very best results heard here 
from any male musical organization. 

The programme was very tastefully arranged and 
"To me Thou Art a Flower," by Daniel Protheroe, 
deserves special mention. It was rendered with the 
finish of a bel-canto and with a sentiment full of the 
charm and characteristic color it demands. 

"The Long Day Closes" which was chosen as a 
memorial number to honor the memory of the late 
Charles James Ellis, the founder of the club, and 
which was performed by his selection in the club's 
first concert, 1888, was rendered in its real spirit 
Tuesday night, and the approval by the auditors of 
this undertaking was not profaned by applause, which 
speaks for the good taste of the big audience, which 
stood during, the rendition of this number. 

The soloists were Mrs. Edmund Shank, who sang 
the "Ariette", by Monsigny, in beautiful voice, with a 
clean coloratura and perfect phrasing ; and Miss Lalla 
Fagge, a violinist of much promise who suffered, evi- 
dently, from nervousness. Miss Mary L. O'Donnoug- 
hue presided at the piano. VERO. 



Another Musician Joins Us 

The Los Angeles musical colony, already noted for 
its prominent list of notable musicians, has gained an- 
other member. This one is a pretty little German wo- 
man, Alma Krausse, who came to town recently with- 
out any brass band announcement and settled herself 
in a comfortable apartment on Hoover street, where . 
she is resting after two successful seasons in Europe 
and the East. She is a native of Heidelberg. She 
sang- for a season with the Marine Band in Washing- 
ton. D- C, and has filled many successful engagements 
in and around New York. Her voice is a mezzo- 
soprano which is said to be of good range and qual- 
ity. L. E. Behymer, the local purveyor of so much 
that is good in a musical way, expects to introduce 
this German singer professionally to the public before 
long. 



Spaniards Most Enthusiastic 

Ernest Schelling, the Pennsylvanian who has made 
such a success in Europe as a pianist and has traveled 
so widely in the fulfillment of professional engage- 
ments, related the following personal anecdotes when 
asked recently what countries he liked most to play in : 

''Naturally I like best to play in America, but there 
are ulterior considerations for that. The most en- 
thusiastic lovers of piano playing are the Spaniards 
in their own country and South America. Travel is 
more uncomfortable in Spain and South America than 
anywhere else in the world but it is worth the incon- 
venience to play for those people, they are so genuinely 
enthusiastic. Sometimes their enthusiasm gets the bet- 
ter of their artistic instincts. I recall an instance while 
I was in South America. I was to play a private re- 
cital in the leading club at Rio. The president and all 
the leading- officials were in the audience. When I 
stepped out on the platform the piano lid was up but 



Pacific Outlook 



29 



the cover was unopened. When I raised this 1 found 
the entire keyboard covered with rose petals. Ii was 
a very beautiful idea ti >r everybody but the pianist. 
< \i course the petals gol down between the keys, and 
the keyboard was wet and slippery. My first number 
sounded like anything bul piano music. Hut I must 
confess that thai keyboard smothered in rose petals 
was a verj prettj sight. 

"Quite as amusing was an experience 1 had in 
Madrid. 1 was about to start for San Sebastiano to 
play before the Spanish court, when a local manager 
asked me if 1 could play a private recital that evening. 
I declined, as an evening engagement would mean my 
having to start out next morning at S o'clock. But the 
manager was persistent and said I could name my own 
price. I gave him a prohibitive figure and he accepted 




Jan Kubki.ik 

it without question, but imposed one condition — that 
I was not to make any attempt to learn the identity of 
the persons for whom 1 was to play. I was also to 
allow the gentleman in question to select the program. 
To this end I gave the manager my repertoire. He 
returned within an hour with the most remarkable 
specimen of program building that ever confronted 
me. My unknown admirer had expressed a desire to 
hear me play the Bach Chromatic Fantasy and Fugene, 
the Bach-List A Minor Fantasy, three Beethoven 
sonatas, nothing less than opus 57. 109 and 111. Cho- 
pin's I! Minor Sonata, the four Ballares, one each of 
the nocturnes, rondos, mazurkas, berceuses, scher os 
and polonaises, with a choice assortment of the pre- 
ludes and etudes, and for a wind-up two Liszt rhap- 
sodies, Nos. " and 11. I began to feel that 1 would 



have to earn mj money, as the program outlined 
would require over live hours in performance. I so 

informed the manager and he returned with profuse 
apologies from my unknown friend who explained 

that he was not familiar with the piano literature and 
begged that 1 select a program of the usual length. 
I he manager called for me in the evening and you 
can judge my surprise when we drew up at the hall 
where 1 had given my concert the previous evening. I 
said nothing, however, as that was part of the bargain, 
and the manager came into the green room and said 
it was time to begin. 1 stepped out on tlvs stage and 
faced a brilliantly lighted but empty hall. Down near 
the front sat a handsome middle aged gentleman with 
an elderly and a young lady and two young men. 
They greeted me with polite applause and i played 
there my recital, giving several encores in response to 
their applause. At the end the elderly gentleman came 
into the green room and thanked me for the pleasure 
I had given them and asked permission to present his 
party. It was a quaint introduction, for, as my 
audience was presented in turn, he said : 'Mr. Schell- 
ing, my wife, my daughter, my nephew, my friend." 
Then supper was brought in and served in the green 
room and we spent a delightful evening, for my new 
friends were cultured and cosmopolitan. But when I 
took my leave I had no more inkling of their identity 
than when the evening began." 



Kubelik 

Jan Kubelik, the celebrated violinist now on his 
third tour of America, will appear at Simpson Audi- 
torium Tuesday and Thursday evenings of next week. 
The following programmes have been arranged for 
these occasions : 

Tuesday, January 28 

1. Sinding ..... Concerto A Dur. 

Allegro energico; Andante; Allegro Giocoso. 

Kubelik 

Barcarolle 
Scherzo D Minor 
'Chanson Triste 
Mile. Roy 
Mile. Roy 

Adagio 

Scherzo 

Poem 

Arr. of Sextette from "Lucia" 

(For Violin alone.) 

Kubelik 

Valsc caprice 
Mile. Roy 

Fantasie 
Kubelik 
Mile. Berthe Roy. Solo pianiste 
Herr Ludwig Schwab, Accompanist 

Thursday, January 30 

Concerto No. S. A Minor 
Gesangsceoe 
Kubelik 

Fugue and variations 
Mile. Roy 

Havanaise 
Scherzo Tarantelle 
Scene a la Csarda 
Kubelik 

1st. Mov. (Concerto C Minor) 
Mile. Roy 

Serenade Melancolique 
Campanella 
Kubelik 



Chopin 
Chopin 
Schumann 



3. (a) Soohr 

(b) Tschaikowsl 

(c) Fibich 
Id) St. Lubin 



Saint-Saens 
Paganini 



1. Spohr 

2. Bach-Liszt 

3. ( ;t ) Saint-Saens 

(b) Wieniwaski 

(c) Hubay 

4. Saint-Saens 

;. (a) Tschaikow sky 

tb) Paganini 



Hibler Musicales 

Mrs. Nellie Hibler, soprano, of Hollywood, has 
made a most flattering success of her series of m Jrning 
musicales. The third musicale was given in Wilcox 



30 



Pacific Outlook 



Auditorium, Hollywood, under Mrs. Hibler's direc- 
tion Thursday morning Jan. 16. Those assisting were 
Miss Bessie Chapin, violinist ; Miss Ethel Pearl 
Mitchell, cornetist ; Miss Lucy Fuhrer ; cellist ; Master 
Vernon Bettin, soprano ; and Messrs John Bettin and 
Otto Kunitz at the piano. The programme included 
twelve numbers and was characterized both by the di- 
versity and the high class of the selections. 

Mrs. Hibler has studios both in Hollywood and 
Ocean Park, and has become widely known profes- 
sionally in this vicinity. She has resided in Holly- 
wood for the past two years. The local and Eastern 
press have highly complimented her work. 

The popularity of Mrs. Hibler's musicales has 
proved such that she is planning an elaborate musicale 
evening to take place in Hollywood just after Easter. 



Music Notes 

Josef Hofmann's recital last Thursday evening will 
be reviewed in the next issue of The Pacific Outlook. 
He gives one more recital at Simpson Auditorium this 
Saturday afternoon, after which he goes north. The 
pianst and his wife arrived here direct from Mexico, 
where he has been filling a series of engagements. 

The Gamut Club is a potent factor in musical circles 
in Los Angeles, and every month the members enter- 
tain som edistinguished vocalist or instrumentalist. 
Friday evening the Club will entertain with a Dutch 
supper these honorary visiting members : Josef Hof- 
mann, Jan Kubelik, the Countess Kubelik and Adela 
Verne. Other guests will be Mme. Hofmann, Zelie de 
Lussan and her husband Angelo Fronani. 

Adela Verne will give another recital at Simpson 
Auditorium Saturday afternoon Feb. 1. It will be 
practically all a request programme. As many of the 
requests are from brother and sister musicians, the 
hardest compositions have been turned in for her ren- 
dition. 

* » * 

The "Unemployable" 

By Perez Field 

The Christian Social Union of London has sent 
out a tract by the Rev. Lewis Donaldson on "The 
Unemployed" which has a particular interest for us 
in> these times of scrip and minus funds, dealing 
■as it does with a class of persons, both male and 
female, which is already large in this city and which 
may possibly increase. 

One distinction he makes is of great value. It 
is the difference which exists between the "un- 
employed" and the "unemployable". He goes on 
to say.: 

"It should be noted that there is a quite inevitable 
tendency for the one to become the other. The 
'unemployed' of one year may be the 'unemployable' 
of the next. When a workman becomes workless, 
and for months, or even years, is left to himself, 
and to wander hither and thither for work he can- 
not find, he rapidly degenerates. First, his trade 
position is broken, then his home, then his heart. 
This is the fate of thousands now designated 'un- 
employable', who were once skilled and honorable 
workmen." 

A man who is out of work in. our climate does 
not have his heart broken so readily as in the 
sterner environments of London. Here the "un- 
emploved" soon becomes the "manana" man, the 
inefficient one who is satised with enough for him- 
self alone. He is the child of extravagance which 
seeks the happiness of today, rather than a child 
of thrift who prefers the happiness of tomorrow. 



These unstable ones, who acquiesce in their, own 
failure, soon become an anxiety and a charge to 
others. They breed a social cynicism in the pros- 
perous, which is the greatest bulwark of unpro- 
gressive conservatism with which any state can 
be burdened. 

* * * 
Experimental Mayors 

A remark which the Register made a few weeks 
ago to the effect that the cities of Connecticut are 
about tired of experimenting with stoker mayors and 
professor mayors and labor mayors, has causesd some 
rather caustic comment in the newspapers of the state, 
some of which have vigorously championed the cause 
of mayors of the sort referred to, and sought to show 
that their work has been valuable, vindicated and 
appreciated, says the New Haven Register. 

Since then Bridgeport has been the first of the cities 
in the list referred to to express its opinion on the 
mayor with which it experimented a few years ago. 
A divided and by some declared unrepresentative 
Democratic caucus nominated Denis Mulvihill for 
mayor again. From the vote of Tuesday it is evident 
that neither party wants him for mayor, that Bridge- 
port is through with him. It may be lack of appreci- 
ation, but it is neither vindication nor commendation 
of the work which Mulvihill has done in Bridgeport. 
If his work had been intelligent and practical, the re- 
sult could hardly have been what it was. 

The subject is hardly a new one. Hartford had its 
turn with a mayor who was placed in the saddle by 
the labor element, and Hartford long ago had enough. 
Middletown, also, has an experimental mayor, though 
of a different sort. There have been brave efforts 
from outside to show that Middletown has had won- 
drous results, and is wondrously pleased, at the ad- 
ministration of the past two years. But there are 
features of the Middletown experiment which one 
must have been on the inside to know accurately, and 
unless intimate signs utterly fail, the voters of Middle- 
town will next January write "failure" in large letters 
across the record of their mayoralty experiment, turn 
it to the wall and try hard to forget it. 

These experimental mayors have been earnest, and 
possibly some of them have been well intentioned. 
But they have been impractical. They have been men 
unrepresentative of all sides of the people, men inex- 
perienced in affairs in the broad sense required of a 
good mayor. Rugged honesty isn't enough; close 
touch with the labor element isn't enough ; mere good 
intention isn't enough. All these are good in their 
place, but they need to be seasoned with good sense, 
and modified by an intelligent understanding of the 
needs of the city, the will and temper of its people, 
and the practical workings of municipal administration 
in g'eneral. Most of the mayors referred to have been 
notably lacking in these respects. Deeming them- 
selves "practical" because they did things differently 
from other mayors, they have merely shown them- 
selves eminently impractical. Connecticut ha,s had 
about enough of that sort of impracticability. A man 
who seeks to run his business along theoretical lines 
without complete knowledge of the needs and wishes 
of the clientele whom he serves will fail. The same 
is true of a mayor who disregards those plain com- 
mercial requirements. 

In a word, the lack which has caused these mayors 
to fail, both in successful administration and in secur- 
ing the confidence of the people, is a lack of tact. 
Tact is a wonderful virtue, and it effectively covers a 
multitude of other shortcomings. 



igeles. California 



STATF 



February 1, 1908 










*■ hg 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Wizardry of the Automatic 
"Central" Exposed 

IS PROHIBITION COMING? 

Phenomenal Growth of Temperance 

Sentiment 



Ode to the Peppertree 



Poem 



Fearless Editorial Comment — Frank Musical and Dramatic Criti- 
cism — Chat from Society and Women's Clubs — 
Literary Notes 



«• ^^jS^ 1 " 



SINGLE COPY 10 CENTS 



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Second Week's Sale 

Extraordinary Purchase 

Stock People's Store, Santa Paula, bought 
at 55c on the $1 

On Sale At About Half Price 

A nice clean fresh stock, that includes most all lines of 
wanted merchandise. WASH GOODS, LINENS, SILKS, 
WAISTS, LACES, RIBBONS, EMBROIDERIES. 
SHOES, DRAPERIES, FANCY GOODS, ETC., ETC. 

Special Features Monday, Feb. 3rd. 

Watch the Sunday Papers for Announcement of Some of the Greatest Bargains 

Ever Exploited 




BROADWAY 



COR FITTM ST. 



USE-IT NAPHTHA WASHING 

POWDER 



Scouring Soap Powder 
Silver Polish 



Are to the Housekeeper, Chef and Laundryman what 
Gold is to the Banker. — Most Secure and Most Impressive. 
Time and Labor Savers are better than Savings 
Banks. The Dividends in Health and Wealth are Sure, 
and Full returns made without "Notice". 

Home Products increase Home "Circulation". Sold by 
all Grocers. 



The American Commercial Co., Ltd. 

Los Angeles, California 




George Baker Jtnderson 

EDITOR AND GENERAL MANAGER 



Jt Southwestern Weekly 

Lanier Bartte't 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR 



Howard Clark Galloupe 

MANAGER OF ADVERTISING 



Published every Saturday at 3I8*319'370 Lissner Building, 
Lot Angeles, California, by the 

Pacific Outlook Company. 

Subscription price Sa.oo a year in advance. Single copy to 
cents on all neuts stands. 

Entered as second-class matter April ;, 1907, at the postoffice at Los Angeles, 
California, under the act of Congress of March $,1870. 

The Editor of the Pacific Outlook cannot guarantee to return manuscripts, 
though he will endeavor to do so if stamps for that purpose are inclosed with them 
If your manuscript is valuable, keep a copy of it. 

Vol. 4. Los Mngeles, Cal., February I, 1908 \o. 5 

NOTICE. TO SUBSCRIBERS 

The Pacific Outlook is mailed to subscribers through 
the Los Angeles Post Office every Friday, and should be 
delivered in every part of the city by Saturday's post. If 
for any reason it should be delayed, or be delivered in 
poor condition, subscribers will confer a favor upon the 
publishers by giving them immediate notice. The date on 
the wrapper shows the time to which your subscription is 
paid as shown by our ledgers. No receipts will be mailed 
unless specially requested. Telephone Home F 7966. 

COMMENT 

THE LEADING ARTICLE in this week's is- 
sue of the Pacific Outlook describes the operation 
of the automatic branch of the Home Telephone and 
Telegraph Company's service. The workings of the 
automatic telephones have been a mystery to the 
great majority of people, and although a personal 
study of the mechanism necessary to the operation 
of the automatic exchange is es- 
Mystery of sential to a perfect understand- 

the "Automatic" ing of the details of such opera- 
tion, it is believed that the arti- 
cle to which we have directed attention will be 
found to cover the ground fully enough to enable 
one to arrive at a comprehension of the. chief prin- 
ciples. So general is the public appreciation of the 
benefits conferred by this splendid system, one of 
the best in the world, that a comprehensive, though 
brief, article clearing up the mystery will be ap- 
preciated by thousands of persons. 

* * * 

WITH THE installation of the Home company's 
service a want that had been felt for a long time 
was filled. For years the people of Los Angeles 
had suffered from the inadequate and otherwise in- 
different service furnished by the giant Bell tele- 
phone monopoly, doing business in this city under 
the name of Sunset. Complaints regarding the 
nerve-destroying character of the service apparently 
received scant, if any, attention. As a result there 
arose a strong popular demand for the organization 
of a home company. Local capitalists responded to 
the appeal of the people, and the present Home 
Telephone & Telegraph Company was 
A Little the outcome. From the beginning it was 
History found that the new service was to be 
immeasurably better than that which the 
inhabitants of the city had received from the old 



concern. With rapid strides the new company, com- 
posed of Pacific Coast capitalists, covered the field, 
until at the present time this company not»only has 
installed a larger number of telephones than the old 
company operated, but the number of calls per day 
per telephone instrument is vastly in excess of the 
number recorded by the Sunset service. It has been 
estimated that Home calls average about eighty per 
cent of all calls in Los Angeles. Notwithstanding 
this fact the Sunset, through the generosity of the 
City Council, is enabled to collect from patrons 
something like fifty per cent more in tolls than the 
Home charges. 

* * * 

THERE IS a general suspicion that the Sunset 
people and the railroads act as a unit when special 
privileges are sought of the council. The suspicion 
has been verified, to the satisfaction of many per- 
sons, by the action of the council last year when the 
question of tolls came up for consideration. The 
Los Angeles Times, which always champions the 
cause of the telephone monopoly, allows few oppor- 
tunities to take a dig at the Home company to 
passT Within a few days it has characterized the 
organization of the Home company as a "great out- 
rage." But as it is now generally understood that 
one or more persons directly identified with the 
management of the Times are stockholders in the 

Sunset company, the attitude of that 

Best in the paper is apparent. While everything 

World possible has been done by the trust to 

hamper the Home people, the tone of 
the citizenship of Los Angeles, fortunately, is such 
that the conditions which recently arose in San 
Francisco have found no parallel here. Louis Glass, 
convicted of bribery in connection with the effort 
of the telephone trust to keep the Home company 
of San Francisco frorii entering the field in that city 
— a man whose reputation was of the best until the 
discoveries which led to his downfall — is the vic- 
tim of this heartless corporation, through whose 
influence he was induced to descend to bribery. But 
fortunately for the inhabitants of this city the efforts 
of the> trust to keep a company composed of home 
capitalists out of the field proved unavailing; and 
the result is that today the service made possible by 
the operation of the Home company is equal to the 
best, if not, indeed, as many declare, the very best 
in the world. 

* * * 

IT IS HARDLY to be believed that the average 
man of intelligence and information on the subject 
will be misled by publications with ulterior aims 
into holding up the hands of the telephone trust in 
its puny war against the home company. If one but 
takes a glance backward into history a few years, 
recalling the overwhelming popular demand for the 
organization of a company which would relieve 
the people from the exactions of the trust, bearing 



Pacific Outlook 



in mind the successful efforts which have been put 
forth by the Home people to give to Los Angeles 
the best service science could devise, he will not 

array himself against the company 

Animus which has been primarily responsible 

Apparent for a better and cheaper telephone 

service and lower rates. These para- 
graphs would not have been written but for the re- 
cent attack of the Times upon the Home company. 
But the animus is so apparent and the attack so 
covert that we conceive it to be our duty, in the 
name of fair play, to call attention to the history of 
telephone operation for a few years past. In Los 
Angeles .there are many thousands of persons who, 
having come here recently to reside, probably are 
not familiar with the facts in the case ; and it is to 
such as these, more especially, that these remarks 
are addressed. The resident of many years knows 
that the Home company needs no defense, except 
before those who were not in Los Angeles when 
a second telephone company began operations. 

* * * 

THE CHIEF local organ of the Herrin-Harriman 
political machine in California employs the deplor- 
able case of Dr. Lanterman, once coroner of Los An- 
geles county, in vindication of its contention that the 
recall is a vicious, unnecessary and unwise institu- 
tion. The logic which enables it to reach this con- 
clusion is of the same variety which it brought into 
play in defending Calhoun and the other alleged 
grafters of San Francisco and condemning the pros- 
ecution which dared reach out after the rich crimi- 
nals as well as the poor. Because Lanterman was 
compelled to resign the office he had disgraced — 
compelled to do so, we say, by the 
Wonderful machine which nominated him at the 

"System" infamous Venice convention, and 
which feared that his trial might re- 
sult in disclosures that would prove extremely dis- 
agreeable to the "regularly constituted Republican 
party of Los Angeles county" — the chief newspaper 
organ of this machine declares itself as follows : 
"He" (Lanterman) "is out without its costing the 
county a cent. Besides being a contrivance for the 
benefit of grafters, grudge-gratifiers and agitators, 
the 'recall' is absolutely unnecessary. * * * 
Here is a striking illustration of the value of the 
well-tried and long-proven systems devised by the 
founders of the American representative govern- 
ment. Public opinion forces Lanterman to resign 
and the taxpayers save $25,000 that the faddists 
would have had them spend." 

* * * 

ALL OF WHICH is very prettily worded, but the 
argument is too thin. Because a man under fire re- 
signs his office at the behest of political friends who 
fear.that his trial in open court may involve them in 
a scandal, the recall is a howling farce, a tool for 
grafters ! Well, well, well ! About a week after 
his arrest for having been drunk and disorderly in a 
house of ill-fame, Lanterman, after having abused 
everybody who had anything to do with his arrest, 
said he would resign if the people demanded it; 
then continued his efforts to escape the 
Boshiest clutches of the local courts by seeking 
of Bosh trial before a higher tribunal. That he 
would have relinquished his office vol- 
untarily nobody believes. That he did so upon the 
earnest solicitation of the county machine most 



persons believed. But that he was about to be in- 
dicted by the grand jury nobody could know, of 
course. There may have been a "leak" somewhere, 
and realizing that his game had come to an end 
Lanterman's questionable valor may have given 
way to discretion. But suppose he had not resigned. 
Where, then, would the beneficence of our present 
'system" of government, extolled by the Times, 
have been exemplified? This particular argument 
against the recall is the boshiest sort of bosh. 

* * * 

"CHINATOWN Faces Red War Cloud. Tong 
Fight May Center in Los Angeles. Flop Sing Mem- 
bers in a State of Terror. Startling Discoveries 
Made by Newspaper Man During Midnight Trip 
Through Oriental Quarters. Marked for Death." 
Thus read the headlines in a Los Angeles Herald 
news item Monday morning. The conditions described 
in the article following are not those in San Fran- 
cisco. They are reported to be those in Los Angeles. 
But whether one city or another faces another tong 
war matters not. The simple fact that such a state 
of affairs as that described in the picturesque language 
employed by this news writer can exist anywhere 
in America is in itself a sufficient 
Hopelessness argument in behalf of ridding the 

of It All country of the law-ignoring element 

responsible for such reigns of terror 
as have been witnessed in Chinese circles in the past 
and may be witnessed again. The Chinese know no 
law except that of their own when it comes to their 
own governance. They are maintaining a small bar- 
barous foreign country within a civilized state. They 
are a government within a government. American 
institutions of law and order are as nothing to them. 
American institutions probably never will be anything 
to them, as a class. Every tong war or threatened war 
is an additional item of testimony as to the utter hope- 
lessness of trying to make a civilized man of the 
average Chinese of the generation now on American 
soil. 

* * 

AN AMUSING commentary on the contempt in 
which the Chinese, down in their hearts, hold Occi- 
dental laws and institutions, and a very pretty example 
of the Oriental's cunning art of playing those whom 
he fears against each other to his own ultimate benefit, 
is the fact that the Chinese in San Francisco were the 
first to contribute to the fund for the entertainment of 
Admiral Evans's fleet when it arrives in the. northern 
bay. In time the whole yellow race undoubtedly will 
stand together against Occidental peoples; but just 
now China fears the fine Japanese hand appearing in 
her affairs. The first contributor to the San Francisco 

entertainment fund mentioned 

Chinese Cunning was from the Sing Chong Com- 

and Our Fleet pany, which appended to its 

check for $100 the following 
"hurrah" for the American fleet (note the clever 
Fourth-of-July ring to the words!) : "Inclosed please 
find our check for $100, which amount we most cheer- 
fully subscribe for the entertainment of the gallant 
defenders of this great Nation who are soon to honor 
us with their presence. We trust that our modest 
donation will serve to start the 'ball a-rolling," and at 
the same time show how thoroughly we appreciate the 
privilege of living xmder the protection of the Stars 



Pacific Outlook 



ami Stripes. In case of necessity do not hesitate to 
call on u^ for another contribution." 

* * * 

THE PACIFIC OUTLOOK has received from 
United States Senator George C. Perkins, since the 
ling <>t' Congress, weekly letters From Washing- 
t n. It is likewise in possession of a zinc halftone 
engraving of the distinguished representative of 
California, sent to it by the subject of such engrav- 
ing. It feels that the time has arrived when some 
sort of an apology is due Senator Perkins for not 
having reproduced in print any portion of these po- 
litical lucubrations so generously contributed to 
numerous newspapers in the state for the enlighten- 
ment of the people as to the beneficent character of 
the efforts being put forth by Mr. Perkins to save 
the country from the woes sure to follow in the 
wake of "Rooseyeltism." The first letter from 

Senator Perkins contained a thinly 

Has the veiled attack upon the President and 

End Come? his policies. The second and third 

and on to the latest contained simi- 
lar assaults, which were made with increasing bold- 
ness. Suddenly the letters have ceased to come. 
The disappointment is great. The literary antics 
of Bill Nye, the humor and pathos emanating from 
the writings of James Whitcomb Riley, even that 
masterpiece of American humor, "The Wonderful 
One-Hoss Shay," have not appealed so intensely to 
such sense of humor as we enjoy as have the letters 
of the Honorable George C. Perkins, with their 
quaint and curious admixture of bathos and leaden 
wit. We could not bring ourselves to publish 
them — they were, in our eyes, too sacred to be hung 
out before the common mob. We feared the public 
might not understand. And, more than all, we shud- 
der to think how easy it .might have been to con- 
vince the people, through these letters, that Presi- 
dent Roosevelt is one of the greatest rascals un- 
hung. 

* * * 

WE ARE patiently awaiting another installment 
of the Perkins propaganda. But we fear that 
"something has dropped" in the vicinity of the 
White House, and that the literary career of the dis- 
tinguished Californian has been brought to a sudden 
and untimely end. In the name of American humor 
we express the hope that this is not the case. In 
the name of the common people, who want to know 
exactly what sort of a scallawag President Roose- 
velt is, we hope that Mr. Perkins will find the time 
and have the inclination to continue his labors. If 
Roosevelt is responsible for all the shocks that 
• have shaken the American nation, if he 
To the is a contumacious jackass if he makes 
Rescue ! and unmakes panics at will, we want to 
know it. It is to be deplored if somebody 
has dropped a sledge hammer on the vigorous right 
hand of Senator Perkins, or welted him in the seat 
of his intellect that the thoughts that have there 
arisen have been jarred loose and finally lost. In 
the name of Truth, let us all join hands in the com- 
mon cause. If Senator Perkins has found his post- 
age bill too onerous since he "tumbled" to the fact 
that his free use of the federal franking privilege 
might not be eminently agreeable to the postoffice 
department, let us make up a purse to heip defray 
his expenses in this direction. But by all means 
let us take no chance of losing forever the outpour- 
ings of his literary genius. 



BENJAMIN li. ( (DELL, Eormer governor of New 
York, the Republican boss of that state and the 
"logical 1 successor to United States Senator Thomas 
C. 1 Matt as head of the infamous Republican machine 
oi the Empire State, is bending every energy toward 
advancing the candidacy of Governor Hughes for the 
presidency of the United States. Comment would 
appear utterly superfluous. Backed by Harriman, 
Odell is becoming recognized as the Herrin of New 
York. Comment on this fact, likewise, would appear 
to be superfluous. Governor Hughes himself has not 
raised a hand to stay Boss Odell, so far as can be 
learned from the telegraph dispatches and the leading 
New York papers. On this subject, also, there is little 

need for comment. It is all too clear. 

Herrinism It is not that these men want to see 

in New York Hughes elected so much as that they 

want to see Taft or any other man 
who stands for the Roosevelt policies defeated. 
Happily the Republican voters of New York state are 
in no frame of mind to submit to the dictation of Odell, 
Harriman or anybody else. The case of Judge Charles 
J. Folger, candidate for governor, a splendid man who 
was slaughtered at the polls in the early eighties be- 
cause many thousands of the Republican voters of 
New York would not submit to dictation, is still fresh 
in the minds of the people of that state. The conditions 
today are not exactly parallel, but there is enough of 
similarity to warrant the prediction that if Odell and 
Harriman force Hughes down the throats of the dele- 
gates to the state convention which names the delega- 
tion to the national Republican convention all bets on 
how New York will vote next fall will be shaky 
propositions. 

* * * 

AT A RECENT meeting of the City Club the work 
of the California Association for the Study and Pre- 
vention of Tuberculosis was explained by its president, 
Charles B. Boothe, and three of its directors, and met 
with such general approval that at a later meeting the 
association was asked to address all the members of 
the City Club on the same subject. Sixteen months 
ago a helping station was established by half a dozen 
public-spirited men to demonstrate the practicability of 
a plan for minimizing the destruction of life by tuber- 
culosis in California. Up to the present time two 
hundred and fifty persons have been cared for and to 
this extent the scattering of much deadly 
Lend as w e alt recognize the necessity of hearty 
a Hand infection has been minimized. Inasmuch 
popular co-operation in this direction, the 
appeal of the association for funds with which its work 
may be carried forward should meet with an immediate 
and generous response. If several hundred persons 
would pledge themselves to give to the association, 
monthly, say one hundred dollars, the helping station 
would be placed, at once, upon a basis that would 
enable it to perform the needed scientific work for re- 
ducing the danger to the general public from daily 
contact with this dreaded disease. Dr. George H. 
Kress, secretary of the finance committee of the asso- 
ciation, 601 O. T. Johnson building, has been author- 
ized to receive cash or subscriptions to aid the associa- 
tion in its undertaking. The Pacific Outlook bespeaks 
for this organization the support of all those who may 
be interested in the fight against tuberculosis — and 
what good citizen is not? 

* * * 

THE REPORT from Washington that William 
Kent, a citizen of Chicago, has just deeded to the 



Pacific Outlook 



United States government 295 acres of "primeval 
redwood forest" on the southern slope of Mt. Tamal- 
pais, in Marin county, that the tract may be declared a 
national monument and preserved for the pleasure of 
the people of that portion of California and the instruc- 
tion of the world at large, comes as a refreshing con- 
trast both to the usual greediness of lumbermen and 
the relentless "straight line" that is so often used in 
"improvement" plans as a cause for the removal of 
beauties of Nature or interesting landmarks. This 

tract of noble forest trees 

Handsome Donation overlooking San Francisco 

to the Public bay is to be made a public 

pleasure ground, and will 
be cared for under the scientific direction of the United 
States Forest Service. It is said that the grant will be 
known as "Muir Woods." As the fine group of red- 
woods to be found within its boundaries are the most 
accessible specimens of their wonderful kind to be 
found in California, being only an hour's ride from 
San Francisco, the importance of preserving them to 
the public is readily apparent; and as the redwood 
timber growing pn these acres is valued at $150,000, 
the public spirit of the business man who thus volun- 
tarily surrenders title to the tract may be appreciated. 

* * * 

HOW OFTEN do we hear of a church, a college, 
a social club of the better class, a Young Men's 
Christian Association or an institution of similar 
class openly defying laws enacted for its govern- 
ance ? Not very often ; never, when such laws re- 
late to the peace or moral welfare of the community. 
But it is different with the whiskey interest and 
such institutions as racetracks. For example, take 
note of the defiant attitude of the "tip" sheet men 
toward the ordinance forbidding the 
Brethren of sale of these vice-breeding publica- 
One Stripe tions in this city. Witness, also, the 
policy of the saloon men in the mat- 
ter of observing the laws regulating their traffic. 
Saloons, brothels and racetracks go hand in hand in 
attempting to set at naught laws ordained for their 
regulation. They smile in derision when threatened 
with legal proceedings. The "booze" interests and 
the brothels, in particular, know they have power- 
ful friends at court. They know that only in the 
last dire extremity, following a widely awakened 
public sentiment, will they have anything serious 
to fear. Eternal vigilance is most certainly the 
price of a healthy moral atmosphere in any city. 

* * * 

WE TENDER assurances of our most profound 
sympathy to Councilman A. J. Wallace. No — upon 
second thought, we will make them words of con- 
gratulation. After due diligence in behalf of the 
public he has at last — glory be ! — reached that emi- 
nence upon which he has become a 
Hochder conspicuous target for the alfalfa 
Watchdog! launched by — well, we won't mention 
the name of the paper. ' What's the 
use ? Line by line the roll of honor has been strung 
out until it now includes the name of nearly every 
individual and association of individuals which have 
taken the field against extravagance, profligacy and 
chicanery in local affairs. The distinguished honor 
has at last come to Mr. Wallace. 

* * * 

THE HEALTH commissioner of Pennsylvania 
has published an order forbidding Pullman porters 



to b'rush the clothes of passengers in the aisles of 
cars within the boundaries of that state. Certain- 
ly this is a sensible edict, and one of the few rules 
which have ever been enforced in the interest of 
the health of the millions of travelers who are com- 
pelled to use those germ incubators, the sleeping 
cars. Any move that will tend to lessen the dange- 
with which the interior of the modern railroad 
sleeper threatens every person who must draw 
breath behind its unsanitary curtains and in close 
proximity to its carelessly used blankets, should 
be supported by all travelers. Commenting on the 
Pennsylvania order prohibiting the brushing of 
clothes in car aisles, the New 
The Unsanitary York Medical Record says : "The 
Sleeping Car practice was instituted by the 
rapacious porters as a means of 
extorting dimes and quarters from their unwilling 
victims, and has been endured simply because no 
one wishes to make himself conspicuous by audible 
protests. It is worse .than useless as a means to 
cleanliness, for the clothes of those first brushed are 
as dirty as before by the time the whole car-load 
has been curried, and what dirt has not settled back 
on the external parts of the travelers has filled thei<" 
nostrils and lungs — not only the dust of the road, 
but the germ-laden accretions from the garments 
of men in all conditions of health and disease. 
Other state boards of health, that have the author- 
ity to issue and enforce orders for the protection of 
the health of the communities they serve, will do 
well to follow the example of Pennsylvania in put- 
ting a stop to this most insanitary and in every way 
objectionable practice." 

# * * 

CHANGES ARE wrought very slowly abroad, 
but public opinion there has its way in the end, 
even though the process of revolution is much more 
tedious than among precipitate Americans. The 
rule that in a theater audience women shall remove 
their headgear during the performance to facilitate 
the general view of the stage has become so well 
established in the United States that we have come 
to regard it as natural as one of the laws of Nature. 
So it sounds a bit funny to hear that in Paris they 
are just waking up to the fact that the big theater 
hat is unfair and unnecessary and are suggesting 
that a rule might be passed abolishing it from the. 
feminine head during theatrical performances. One 
report from Paris says that " a celebrated journal 
offers a gold medal to the per- 
Paris Rages son that most successfully de- 
at Theater Hat stroys the next hat that ob- 
structs his view of the stage," 
and also that "the Parisians who have traveled in 
the United States are trying to persuade the thea- 
ter managers to follow the American plan for pre- 
venting the abuse, but so far without success." 
Such are the benefits of travel. May these enlight- 
ened few finally succeed along this line of reform ! 
A bas these obstructive monuments of vanity and 
selfishness ! The idea has spread to London. When 
the London theaters rule out obstructive hats, do 
away with the abominable idea that patrons should 
tip the ushers, stop charging for programmes and 
reduce the price lists that require the payment of 
four shillings for a seat in .what we would call 
the "peanut gallery," way up under the ceiling, 
then they will have begun to be practical. 



Pacific Outlook 



THE COMPLIMENTARY notices received by 
the City Club from i ho Times in these days consist 
chiefly in references to this organization as "the 
Non-Partisans." Notorious for its misstatement of 
farts when touching upon public men atul institu- 
tions which are not in line with its selfish political 
policies, the Times takes great delight in attempting 
to ridicule such men and institutions. "The Non- 
partisans." Well, yes; we arc afraid the City Club 
with its 640 members will be compelled to plead 
guilty to the indictment. It is non-partisan in the 
highest and best sense of the term, but not in 
the sense intimated by the Times. So thoroughly 
non-partisan is this organization that it has admitted 
to membership such men as Mayor 
Guilty! Harper. Postmaster Motley H. Flint, 
Guilty! Donald Barker, former partner of 
United States Senator Frank P. 
Flint. Judge Curtis D. Wilbur, Joseph Messmer, 
Charles H. Toll, Eugene Germain — who, by the 
way, has introduced more new members than any 
other member of the club. W. T. Craig, O. E. Farisii 
and Milton K. Young. Along with these are a few 
"dreamers" and "anarchists" and "men of unset- 
tled minds" like Lee C. Gates, Thomas E. Gibbon, 
A. J. Wallace. O. T. Johnson, Dr. W. A. Lamb, 
Dana Bartlett, Dr. John Willis Baer, Supervisor 
George Alexander, James A. Anderson, Charles B. 
Boothe. Sidney A. Butler, Harry R. Callender, the 
Rev. William 'Horace Day, J. M. Elliott, Dr. John 
R. Haynes, the Rev. Burt Estes Howard, Dr. West 
Hughes, J. O. Koepfli, the Rev. Baker P. Lee, D. E. 
Luther, W. B. Mathews, Leonard Merrill, Niles 
Pease, W. J. Washburn, Thomas L. Woolwine and 
Judge John D. Works. Non-partisan? Surely! 

* * * 

IN MORE than one American city, among which 
Cleveland, Ohio, is probably the most conspicuous 
example, the workhouse or city farm has been found 
to be the true solution of the perplexities arising 
from inadequate jail facilities. The subject of a 
workhouse or farm for the city of Los Angeles is 
one which the council would do well to consider 
seriously. The Cleveland experiment has been emi- 
nently successful. A recent number of the Outlook 
(New York) contained an article descriptive of the 
operation of the Ohio institution which should be 
in the hands of every member of the council. The 
writer furnishes abundant evidence that the Cleve- 
land plan solves the problem of caring for the city's 
unfortunates. When somebody made the charge, 
during a campaign which resulted in the re-election 
of Mayor Johnson, that the workhouse had failed 

to make money out of its prisoners. 
Why Not a after four years of trial, the answer 
Workhouse? came back: "We are not trying to 

make money out of prisoners ; we are 
trying to make men." The chief question which 
Mayor Johnson has tried to solve has been : "What 
does society owe to its poor, its destitute, its weak, 
its friendless, its offending members? not, How will 
we get rid of them at the lowest cost and with the 
least trouble? Have we a right so to punish the 
boy and the man, the girl and the woman, that our 
punishment leaves them more hopeless, more vi- 
cious, than they were before? Is it just to annihi- 
late self-respect by placing on every offender a 
brand of shame that years of effort will not eradi- 
cate?" Cleveland unquestionably has made a suc- 
cess of its life-saving undertaking. It has pointed 



to the path which, if followed bv other cities, will 
result in saving to society the services of many men, 
and women, to,,, who, if left to shift for themselves 
after having served a term in a Common jail, will 
emerge into the world immensely worse than before'. 
The workhouse problem certainly is one which is 
worthy of careful study by the people of l.os An- 
geles. 

* * * 

Chile Con Came 

Los Angeles needs no "tips" from the Arcadia 
College of Vice. 

We have an anti-smoke nuisance, but the smoke 
pays little attention to it. 

Bv the way, have the interurban cars been 
equipped with fenders that fend? 

Heney and Gage in a tilt over the final disposition 
of Abe Ruef would be a sight fit for the gods of 
war. 

The "Taft Republican Clubs," otherwise the for- 
lorn hope of Herrinism, have gone to seed. It is not 
so easy to fool the people as of yore. 

Trouble frequently drives a man to drink ; but 
have you ever hesitated to reflect how much more 
often drink drives a man into trouble? 

If Chief of Police Kern should happen to be over- 
come by a consuming thirst Sunday afternoon, let 
him drop in at the Imperial, or one of several other 
liquor dispensaries in town. 

The newspaper "vultures," as Earl Rogers styled 
them, which hung about waiting to swoop down 
upon the carcass of his most important recent client, 
were fooled after all. 

A few weeks ago Calhoun cried that the graft 
prosecution would drive capital from San Francisco. 
The other day he returned from New York with a 
few more millions of dollars in his pocket. 

If Councilman Blanchard's vote may be recorded 
in his absence, why need any of the members of the 
council attend its sessions? It will be so easy for 
the clerk to attend to the minor detail of voting for 
the various members. 

Mayor Harper promised to reappoint James N. 
Anderson to the Board of Public Works, provided 
Mr. Anderson would accept. Mr. Anderson's term 
expired a month ago. Is the mayor a man of. his 
word or just a small politician? 

"I am absolutely certain." declares William J. 
Burns, "that Patrick Calhoun and the other 'higher- 
ups' will be convicted, for the evidence of their 
guilt is absolute." Skeptics should learn these words 
by heart. They are stimulating. 

Jack London's widely proclaimed "seven years' 
cruise around the world" in a toy boat lasted about 
as long as most of the anarchistic doctrines he 
preaches would last if put to the test. The "cruise" 
stood the seven-year test for just seven months. 

The editor of the Fresno Republican has some- 
thing to say about "servile labor" in a recent issue 
of his paper. He wants to send to Mexico for it. 
What's the use? Isn't enough "servile labor" to be 
found in the ranks of the Southern Pacific hirelings' 

Mrs. Ella Wheeler Wilcox, the impassioned poet- 
ess, whose literary output finds its chief market in 
the offices of the Hearst papers, wears a two-and- 



Pacific Outlook 



one-half-inch-in-diameter miniature of an angora 
catess at her throat, a gigantic ring on the thumb of 
her left hand, and an Ellen Terry expression on her 
face. 

Herrin has decided that the California delegation 
to the Republican national convention shall consist 
of James N. Gillett, Michael H. de Young, George 
A. Knight and Harrison Gray Otis. But doesn't 
somebody else decide that matter? Herrin has kept 
de Young out of the United States senate a long 
time. What's his scheme now? 

* * * 

WHAT NOTED PEOPLE SAY 



The Boy Question 

J. P. Monroe, Boston Manufacturer 
The business man asks that the school send boys 
to him in good health, mentally, morally, and phys- 
ically ; that the boy have vim, energy, and hustle — 
by whatever name you care to call that greatest 
blessing in life, the joy in work. Does our present 
academic training do this? During the school years 
the boy's muscles need every development. He 
needs the use of the large muscles of his trunk, his 
legs, and his arms, and you chain him down to a 
desk. He rebels, for he knows the kind of work in 
which he belongs. The boy who, more than any 
other human being, likes to work, you give a train- 
ing which makes him hate work, and you send him 
to us hating work. Industrial education will change 
these things. It can be done in open workshops or 
out of doors. It will give the boy the variety he 
craves ; it will give him work for his muscles. Best 
of all, the boy will be doing things. That is what 
the boy wants ; to do something. And we set him 
down a-t a desk to learn what somebody else did 
five thousand years ago. 



Peace Accomplished 

Secretary Taft 
Peace prevails throughout the Philippines today 
in a greater degree than ever in their history, either 
under Spanish or American rule. Agriculture is 
nowhere now impeded because of fear on the part 
of the farmers of predatory bands. Under the 
policy inaugurated by President McKinley in re- 
ference to the establishment of a temporary gov- 
ernment in the Philippines, a community consisting 
of 7,000,000 people, inhabiting 300 different islands, 
many of whom were in open rebellion against the 
government of the United States for four years, 
with all the disturbances following from robber 
and predatory bands which broke out from time to 
time, due to local causes, have been brought to a 
state of profound peace and tranquillity, in which 
the people, as a whole, are loyally supporting the 
government in the maintenance of order. 



Forty Million Acres Open 
Gov. Curry of New Mexico 
New Mexico is the land of the small farm. It is 
coming to be understood that a better and surer 
livelihood is to be made from ten acres of highly- 
cultivated irrigated land, than from 160 acres of 
prairie land in the farming districts of the middle 
■west, where the farmer is subjected to the vagaries 
of drouth and flood. The American farmer has 
found out something of this and he is coming to 



New Mexico in tens and hundreds and thousands. 
He is bringing with him his energy and push and 
hustle, and he is joining in the demand, now being 
voiced by every New Mexican, that the people of 
this territory be admitted to the full rights of 
citizenship. 

New Mexico has forty million acres of public 
lands open to entry. In this tremendous area are 
homes for millions, range for vast flocks and herds, 
highly mineralized districts, the surfaces of which 
have just been scratched; vast forests and un- 
limited wealth of coal. The industrial development 
of this territory has just begun, but it has advanced 
sufficiently, now, to entitle us to admission to the 
union. The fact that the territory has been able to 
advance so far, beneath the handicap of the terri- 
torial form of government, is in itself proof positive 
of the richness of our natural resources. 



Rests with the People 

Atty. Gen. Bonaparte 
In our country, neither the president nor any one 
else can execute the laws faithfully or execute 
them at all, unless the American people wish them 
executed. If it be truly the people's wish that any 
laws or that all laws shall become dead letters 
whenever rich or influential men find their faithful 
execution a source of loss or danger to themselves, 
then such laws cannot be, and will not be, enforced 
against such men. But I. for one, believe firmly 
that the people have no such wish, and I believe 
further that practically every one else believes 
about this as I do'; so that the very men who raise 
these misleading clamors do not, because they dare 
not, say plainly what they mean and what they 
think. 

* * * 

A Tourist Tomcat 

Conductor Jesse Miller of the Santa Fe is cred- 
ited with the authorship of a cat story which would 
make President Roosevelt and all other anti-nature 
fakers turn giddy, says the Albuquerque Journal. 
The story is, however, vouched for with proof that 
no one but a confirmed skeptic can doubt. 

The cat was a small animal of the gray variety. 
It was first noticed on the Santa Fe passenger train 
near Gallup, comfortably ensconced on the trucks 
under the engine tender. At Winslow when the 
train changed engines, the cat hopped nimbly down 
and waited until the new engine backed up and 
coupled on. Then, in spite of the efforts of by- 
standers, the cat jumped the train as it pulled out. 
Three times Thomas leaped for the tender trucks 
and at last, after miraculous escapes from losing 
three of his nine lives he made good and caught 
the train. 

The performance, it is said, was repeated every 
time the train changed engines. The cat was last 
heard of at Ludlow, Cal., and by that time mes- 
sages were being sent to look out for the cat and 
see that it got safely aboard. Further news of the 
cat will be awaited with interest. It was evidently 
a California cat, whose homing instinct didn't stop 
at a little thing like riding the brakebeam and tht 
rods. Or it may have been merely a cat of con- 
firmed hobo habits. At any rate, it must be ad- 
mitted that it was a cat of most unusual qualities. 
The report that it took its meals regularly at the 
Harvey houses has not yet been confirmed. 



Pacific Outlook 






^ 



©be to tbe pepper XLree 



(By Jlxel Emil Qibson 

O noble pepper tree, 

The queen of trees and flowers, 

Whose fairy symmetry 

Is traced in beauty's bowers — 

Where strength and grace 

A matchless maze 

Of leaves and buds are molding, 

And fragrant life. 

Aloof from strife 

Is radiantly unfolding — 

Hail thee, Oh pepper tree, 

As fragrant as a flower, 

Whose outward harmony 

Is poised on inward power. 

Oh noble pepper tree, 

How modest in thy glory, 

How tranquil, strong and free! 

Thou tellest thy beauty story — 

Those drooping leaves, 

The fairy weaves 

Through zephyrs sweet caresses 

And spreads a calm, 

Which like a balm 

At once subdues and blesses — 

Therefore, Oh pepper tree, 

Thou queen of trailing splendor, 

Accept as gift from me 

The word of my surrender. 

O noble peppertree 

In lands of sunsets glowing — 

In lands where men are free 

And riches overflowing. 

These blessed lands 

Where sunkissed sands 

Enchain a mighty ocean, 

And dizzy heights 

Unravel sights 

That stir to high emotions. 

Hence, noble peppertree, 

Thou pride of vast dominions, 

My heart here brings to thee 

Its gift on rosy pinions. 





10 



Pacific Outlook 



"Wizardry of trie Autom 

YOU do it often every day, yet it is probable that 
you have not the least idea why you insert your 
fingers in certain apertures and revolve the dial a 
definite number of times — no idea of the reason of the 
process, except the result. But every time you call a 
number on an automatic Home phone, whether or not 
you realize the wizardry of your action, you are putting 
into operation one of the most wonderful processes that 
it ever was granted to the brain of man to develop or to 
his fingers to operate. 

The mechanical details of the automatic telephone 
seem a mass of complication to the layman whose brain 
is not trained in mechanics ; yet the men who preside 
over the system — the telephone nerve specialists who 
keep the wonderful internal organism in "tone" — say 




Leo Keller 

Chief Engineer of the local Home Telephone Company 

that the real wonder of it all is its perfect simplicity. 
After all, simplicity is the only perfect end of any work 
— it is art ; so here, in this mechanical achievement, we 
have a mechanical device which is actually artistic in 
its masterful simplicity — simplicity evolved from help- 
less intricacy. Evolved only after tremendous brain 
effort and the expenditure of much time, for simple as 
is the finished product, the evolution of the idea from 
the moment it was first sensed must have been through 
mechanical tangles inconceivably difficult to the aver- 
age mind. Thus it is with art; and simplicity is 
universally recognized as the ultimate greatness of a 
work, not because the resultant achievement accom- 
plishes its purpose easily and without any suggestion of 
previous effort, but because simplicity, which alone is 



atic "Central" Exposed 

useful, always represents the success of a struggle with 
a stubborn intricacy. 

An hour spent in one of the automatic telephone 
exchanges, listening to the click and purr of human 
thoughts flashing mysteriously in and out of the 
mechanical "centrals," which work away day and night 
so busily, so correctly, hearing, answering, counting, 
distributing' thousands of conversations over the length 
and breadth of the city, saving time and money for 
their employers by never wasting a moment (these 
centrals spend less than five seconds in making each 
connection), all without the aid or guidance of human 
ear or hand or eye — such an hour will puzzle you 
mightily, despite the smiling assurance from the master 
of it all that the automatic switches are simplicity itself. 

It is difficult to give a correct explanation of the 
workings of the automatic telephone without making it 
somewhat technical. Perhaps the clearest and most 
correct idea will be conveyed by quoting the exact 
language used by Chief Engineer Leo Keller of the 
Home Telephone and Telegraph Company of Los 
Angeles, who has personal charge of the automatic 
system, and who recently explained its mechanism to 
the Pacific Outlook. 

But first there are a few points of general interest to 
be mentioned. 

A man by the name of Strowdger, of Iowa, is said 
to be the inventor of the first practical automatic tele- 
phone arrangement. This was as much as fifteen years 
ago, but for a long time the process was used only in 
a small way. 

There are now seventy-five towns and cities in the 
United States in which the modern automatic system 
is used, but Los Angeles is the first citv with service on 
a large scale where a series of automatic exchanges 
have been used. The company employing this system 
here now operates eleven local exchanges, and half of 
its 30,000 telephones are equipped with the automatic 
device. Ultimately the whole Home system will be 
automatic. About $750,000 already has been spent in 
introducing' the automatic system. While it costs more 
to install an automatic telephone plant than the old 
manual system, the ultimate saving to the company is 
said to be great. The number of employes necessary 
to every five thousand phones under the automatic 
system is about twelve ; under the old manual system it 
is about 156. All worry about obtaining and retaining- 
a large number of girls for the switchboards is obviated 
by the automatic, and the results the latter gives are 
said to be much more satisfactory to subscribers. The 
automatic never makes a mistake ; if you get the wrong 
number it is your own fault — you have not operated' 
the dial correctly. 

This is how Engineer Keller explains the successive 
steps of the process by which you secure connection 
with a designated number in less than five seconds : 

"The automatic calling device consists mainly of an 
impulse wheel fastened onto the same axle with the 
dial, two platinum-tipped springs on which the two 
line wires terminate, one platinum-tipped contact post 
on which the ground wire terminates, a speed governor 
and a finger stop. If a subscriber wishes to call say 
No. 23456, he places his finger in the dial hole opposite 



Pacific Outlook 



11 



figure 2 and rotates the dial as far as the finger stop 
will allow. In revolving back the impulse wheel first 
I>iT"i-v one si.k' of the line twice against the ground 
contact and the other side of the line just once against 
the ground contact. This interruption, making and 
breaking first one side of the line and then the other 
side of the line to ground, has the effect in the exchange 
of actuating two magnets which, in turn, actuate a 
ratchet-like arrangement. These ratchets act upon a 
shaft. ' The tir-t act of impulse lit't- the shaft up and 
the impulse on the second side of the line rotates the 

shaft. To this shaft are fastened contact springs, 
anil these form what is known as a sub- 
scriber's or first selection switch. Stepping the 
shaft up tow steps and rotating it connects 
these shaft contacts to a trunk line leading to 
the portion of the system where all 20.000 group 



of the 400 group line terminal of the 23,000 section 
of the system. 

'By stepping this connector up five anil rotating it 
in six the shaft contacts are placed directly on the 56 
terminal of the 23,000 hoard, thus completing the con- 
nections with \. i, 23,456. 

"When through talking, the act of hanging up the 
receiver connects momentarily both sides of the line 
to the "ground," which, through a very ingenious ar- 
rangement, releases all four switches Used in establish- 
ing a connection. 

"In connection with this process it is important to 
know that as each switch has done its share of the 
work it automatically disconnects itself from the line, 
'leaving the line of communication which you are estab- 
lishing perfectly clear for talking purposes. 

"From the foregoing description one would think 



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Close View op an Auaomatic Switchboard 



numbers are located. This trunk line terminates on a 
second selection switch which is very similar to a first 
selector. The difference is thai, whereas each sub- 
scriber has a first selector of his own, one hundred 
subscribers have the common iise of ten second selec- 
tors. This second selector being now brought, through 
the action of the first selector, into contact with the 
calling 'phone, corresponds to the second move of the 
dial, being, in the number we are considering, the 
figure 3 ; and steps up three steps, from which third 
step, or level, as it is known, a pair of wires connect to 
a third selector located in the 23,000 group of the sys- 
tem. At the next move of the dial figure 4 will step 
the third's selector up to the fourth level, which leads 
to a final or connector switch located in the 23,400 
group of the system. From this connector one hun- 
dred pairs of wires lead to the one hundred phones 



that all this would take up a lot of time. As a matter 
of fact, the average time consumed in calling a five 
figure number is less than five seconds. Should the 
called line be busy, the two parties talking are not dis- 
turbed, but the calling party will receive a busy buzz 
signal. 

"There is no doubt that the automatic is one of the 
greatest and most ingenious inventions of the present 
age." 

When the local Home Telephone service was in- 
augurated, about five years ago, it was believed by the 
founders of the company, after considerable allowance 
for the city's growth, that about 10,000 'phones would 
accommodate all possible subscribers for an indefinite 
time to come. Consequently a manual switchboard 
with a capacity of 10,000 was installed. In less than 
two years the phenomenal growth of Los Angeles had 



12 



Pacific Outlook 



so increased the demands on this telephone system that 
it became imperative that some process more flexible, 
allowing of more rapid expansion, than the manual 
switching' system be introduced. The question of 
securing an adequate number of telephone operators 
was becoming a serious one, and it was decided, de- 
spite the immense immediate expense it would entail, 
to introduce the automatic system as one which would 
at one and the same time solve the question of opera- 
tors, allow of rapid addition of new lines and furnish 
the most correct service to subscribers. 

In this matter of operators it is interesting to note 
that here in Southern California, where the opportuni- 
ties for more remunerative and less confining employ- 
ment are so many and where the climate is so sug- 
gestive of outdoor pursuits and enjoyments, it is more 
difficult than it is in any other portion of the United 
States to keep a large manual telephone system sup- 
plied with sufficient girls twenty-four hours of the 
day, seven days of the week. 

Since the automatic system was first installed here 
by a Chicago firm the minor deficiencies which it de- 



and good to know, full of best promise, and in a fair 
way to become a product of which California would 
have been very proud. Seeing this, the Southern 
Pacific put to work upon him its cunning "interest" 
system of debauchery, and, in ten years, by its work- 
ings, ruined him body and soul. I knew him then 
and know him now. The contrast is more than 
shocking; it is revolting. 

Abraham Ruef, as a young man, was a fine sample 
of that high-toned sweet Jewish home life that makes 
the best of men. He had brains, too, in plenty, and 
ambition along political lines. But he ttjed to play 
the political game as conducted by the Southern Pa- 
cific in San Francisco. Result : The unmaking of a 
great and useful man and the making of a confessed 
traitor and debaucher. 

Charles E. Thomas, recent test candidate for post- 
master of Berkeley, in the first real fight between 
Devil and Decency in this state was once, to my 
knowledge, all that could be asked of a rising man 
according to the highest standards. He is not now. 
The Southern Pacific killed him. 




Olive Street Exchange, Showing Automatic Switching Apparatus for 5,000 'Phones 
The room is planned to accommodate 20,000 'Phones 



veloped under the severe test of metropolitan demands 
(automatic switching never before having been done 
through a series of exchange offices) have been over- 
come by the Home engineers, who have been con- 
stantly improving on the original patents. Mr. Keller 
and others have introduced inventions which are now 
in use on local telephones, and Mr. Keller has im- 
portant patents pending in Washington now. 
* * * 

the: severest indictment 

By Eyesandears 

WHETHER or not the Southern Pacific is ever 
indicted by a gran a jury for its many and 
heinous crimes, beyond doubt the People of 
the State of California are indicting it in this 
present upon many and specific counts. One 
count, however, I have not seen exploited hereaway, 
though it is the chief count among decent citizens in 
Northern California. A few instances will make clear 
what I mean. 

Tirey L. Ford came to the state senate years ago 
from a northern district. He was good to look upon 



Cooper, Kerrigan, Hall — the men who have made 
Justice a stench in the United States — I know them 
well. Machine-made men of the best approved Harri- 
man-Herrin type, they released Ruef and Schmitz be- 
cause, if they didn't, the "higher-ups" were likely to 
get hurt : and they did it. Yes, they did it. That 
says it all. 

I could go on and on, down this terrible line, multi- 
plying- instances where noble women have given their 
all to make manly sons, only to see the Southern Pa- 
cific turn them into veneered devils before their prime. 
Indeed, so true is this that San Francisco bay region 
has become a place unfit for the young to try to start 
in life. If they would be clean, they cannot succeed; 
if they yield to the railroad forces, they . rot before 
they are ripe. 

This, then, is the chief count of the indictment : The 
Southern Pacific "system" is ruining our sons and 
daughters — making it practically impossible for Cali- 
fornia to produce what God intended her to rear — the 
best men and women in this big world. 

What think you of it, kind sir, good madame ? For 
myself, I've taken my children out of the San Fran- 



Pacific Outlook 



13 



cisco bay region, the home of this 'System." and n<'\\ 
I'm going to take a hand in the coming primaries. 
The "system," prime-minister of the devil and execu- 
tive by devil's means only, has run California just 
twenty years too li n 

Will you help us tree the state? All we have to 

do is carry the primaries. 

9 9 9 
EarthquaKe-proof Library 

Profiting by the disastrous lesson experienced in 
the recent earthquake by Stanford University, sayo 
the Berkeley Independent, the University of Cali- 
fornia is doing what it can to obviate all danger 
from a recurrence of such a shake by building the 
new and expensive Doe library upon bedrock, with 
all pillars resting directly upon solid rock. In or- 
der to accomplish this the contractors putting in 
the foundations have been compelled to sink deep 
wells in places where the solid strata had been bro- 
ken near the surface. In other places the rock 
cropped so near the surface that miners had to be 
employed to drill into the solid lime deposits and 
blast away a trench of sufficient width to admit the 
concrete foundation. 

While the work of blasting away the rock inch 
by inch is slow and tedious, it is not delaying the 
work on the Doe library beyond the original plans, 
because the contractors have made allowances for 
this work and before beginning on the foundation 
made borings all around the site to determine just 
how deep they would have to go to reach bedrock. 
In several places the rock strata that underlies ths 
site appeared to have been broken, so that the cen- 
ter pillars rest on concrete pillars many feet deep, 
where wells were bored through the thick earth 
covering and broken crust. 

Victor Henderson, secretary to the regents, in 
explaining why this unusual precaution was taken 
in placing the foundation for this building, said the 
university authorities purposed to obviate as much 
as possible all danger from earthauake by having 
the building rest only on bedrock. 

"During an earthquake," said Mr. Henderson, 
"a building resting on solid rock is not shaken a: 
all, or only very slightly. The earthquake wave is 
always most violent in its movement through the 
ground above the solid rock, and it has been ob- 
served that a building resting on foundations built 
upon the earth above the solid rock are shaken vio- 
lently. The university is not taking any chances 
with another earthquake, and is building this li- 
brary on the solid rock, where an earthquake in 
future vears will not shake it until it crumbles and 
falls." 

* * * 

It Never Rests 

The minister was addressing the Sunday-school. 
"Children, I want to talk to you for a few moments 
about one of the most wonderful, one of the most 
important organs in the whole world," he said. "What 
is it that throbs away, beats away, never stopping, 
never ceasing, whether you wake or sleep, night or 
day. week in and week out, month in and month out, 
year in and year out, without any volition on your 
part, bidden away in the depths, as it were, unseen 
by you, throbbing, throbbing, throbbing rhythmically 
all your life long?" During this pause for oratorical 
effect a small voice was heard: "I know; it's the k ;1s 
meter !" 




>c\ MEN'S SUITS 

$15.50 

^Tf Values $25, $30, $35. 



(Vl'toiii lines "f fine Chesterfield Suits, 
V;C1 ""'l including blacks, blues and fan- 
cy patterns, marked at the one Hat price. 
$15.50, for quick clearance. These suits are 
regular $25, $30 and $35 values, with all the 
perfection of tailoring a.nd finish that puts 
Chesterfield clothing in a class by itself. 
They're rare bargains at $15.50. 



MATHESON CO. BERNER 

Broadway, Cor. 3rd 



s 



Not Connected With Other Stores 



uperior Carpets anfc Ikuqs 



— ■ ■ ■—■ Our entire top floor is devoted to the display of our floor coverings. 

New exclusive designs, artistic palterns and beautiful colorings ate shown in abund- 
ance and everything you could wirh for will be found in this immense assortment. 

Prompt Delivery in Perfect Condition 



L 



i™ 640-646 SOUTH MILL ST. i 



:- 



Holtzclaw, Allen®. Co. 

Successors to McCann, Allen & Co. 

Decorators and Furnishers 

Exclusive Designs a Specialty 
347 South Hill Street 



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Otto Stcincn Supply Co. V 


k Vj®) 


Shaving Outfits, Pocket and 

Table Knives, Corkscrews, 1 

Manicure Goods, Silverware, 


Tyvurv pf //J\ 


scissors, SDears, Cutlery /-.» *■ -*■ \ _ I \J >V' 1 
Specialties and Novelties. ^^i«b^ ^"1 J* *\j£ 


do it well. 




210 W. 1 hird St. Los Angeles 





Pacific Outlook 




By Fred F. 

Who Probably Will be the Nominee of 

The almost universal sweep of the prohibition 
wave throughout the South is an epoch-making 
event and is attracting attention throughout the 
world. The passage by the Georgia legislature of a 
state-wide prohibitory law banishing every saloon, 
brewery and distillery by a vote of three to one 
was followed in a short time by a similar law being 
passed by the legislature of Alabama by a still 
larger majority, notwithstanding the city of Mobile 
threatened to secede if it were enacted. 

In the meantime Oklahoma had come into the 
sisterhood of states with a Constitution prohibiting 
the liquor traffic from that state. The state of 
Tennessee is all "dry" but five cities, located in 
three different counties. Kentucky is nearly as 
completely dry, even Bourbon county having gone 
prohibition. Texas has a large portion of the state 
already dry, and a state-wide movement is now on 
looking to the election of a prohibitory legislature 
that will place this magnificent commonwealth in 
the prohibition column. 

The governors of North Carolina, Florida and 
Mississippi are avowed prohibition Democrats, and 
the last-named state will be the next one to join the 
prohibition group, probably within sixty days, to be 
followed closely by the others. In fact it is freely 
predicted that the South will be solidly prohibition 
within five years, and the question is often asked : 
"Why is the South advancing so much more rapidly 
than the North in this matter?" There are two spe- 
cial reasons and other contributory ones. 

1st. The South is today more generally American 
in thought and purpose and life than is the North. 
The people of the South retain more of the old- 
fashioned native American- opinions of home and 
morality and conduct. The influx of foreign popula- 
tion in the North has lowered our moral standards 
about drinking, Sabbath desecration and other social 
questions, until today the South excels the North 
in these respects. 

2nd. The negro problem is ever present with 
the South, and the awful consequences of the liquor 
traffic upon the negro, both in its moral and its 
economic phases, have compelled action. The pro- 
hibition of the liquor traffic has been an evolution 
there. In the old days the average planter sold his 
own negroes whiskey with the corn and bacon and 
other necessities which they required. But a dol- 
lar's worth of whiskey sold Saturday night meant 
a drunken negro on Sunday, and a sick negro on 
Monday, not returning to work until Tuesday, per- 
haps afternoon. 

This meant great economic loss (waiving the 
crimes. that resulted) to the planter when he could 
not plant, or cultivate, or harvest his crops for- want 
of sufficient help. His first evolution was to de- 
termine that he would not sell his own negroes 
whiskey. This resulted in some of them leaving 
him entirely to work for other plantations where 
they could secure whiskey, and in many more going 
to adjoining plantations and purchasing it, and the 
planter was worse off than before. 

His next step was to induce his neighbors to join 



Wheeler 

the Prohibition Party for President 

with him and vote it out of their town — this was 
town option. But it was so easy to go or send into 
adjoining towns and purchase it that the planters 
were not much better off. Their next evolution was 
to county option, and a very large portion of all 
the South is now under county option. But owing 
to the decisions of the courts that under the inter- 
state commerce laws liquors may be shipped any- 
where in unbroken packages, a "jug trade" of large 
proportions has grown up. Liquor is sent by 
express to fictitious names and delivered to anyone 
who can pay the pride, thus making the express 
agent the town bartender. 

The result of all this has been to convince the 
people of the South that the liquor traffic is so 
law-defying, so brazen and determined in its efforts 
to increase its business, regardless of the moral con- 
sequences or the financial burdens imposed upon 
other lines of industry, that they have arisen in 
their might and are now determined to drive it en- 
tirely out of their beloved Southland. 

Several bills have already been introduced in 
Congress which, if adopted, will place all liquors 
when shipped into another state subject to the laws 
of the state to which they are consigned. When 
this is accomplished and another law forbidding 
the internal revenue department from accepting 
money for receipts or permits (virtually licenses) 
in prohibition communities is passed, the faithful 
enforcement of prohibitory enactments will be much 
easier and more efficient. 

But this movement is riot confined to the South. 
One year ago we had three prohibition states with 
a population of 2,800,000 people. Today we have 
six prohibition states with a population of 9,145,490 
and fourteen other states where. the fight is on with 
the certainty that several of them will be won. 

There are more than eighty cities under absolute 
prohibition in seventeen different states, the largest 
being Atlanta, Georgia, with a population of 160,- 
000, Worcester, Mass., with 130,000, and Kansas 
City, Kans., with 100,000. The entire eighty cities 
average more than 25,000 population each, thus ex- 
ploding the theory that prohibition can not be en- 
forced in cities. A rigid enforcement of the law in 
Kansas City, Kans., the past year by the attorney- 
general has resulted in closing every saloon and 
brewery in the city, with wonderful benefits to the 
legitimate business and banking interests, large in- 
crease in school attendance, and consequent happi- 
ness and prosperity of the people generally. 

The most striking illustration the world has ever 
witnessed of the value and efficiency of prohibition 
in a large city was seen in San Francisco after the 
earthquake, as acknowledged by all local papers, 
and even forcing Mayor Schmitz to say : "I do not 
pose as a prohibitionist, a reformer, or a radical, but 
we have proved one thing in the present municipal 
administration, viz., that the so-called 'necessary' 
evils of a great city are necessary only so long as 
the people permit them to be, and not an instant 
longer; and that every law on the statute books 
touching these necessary evils can be enforced as 



Pacific Outlook 



15 



fully and successfully as any • >tbcr. providing the 
officials care to respect their oaths of office." 

The weakness of the movement in the South lies 
in the fact that thus far it is treated as a state issue 
only. The evil is nation-wide, and nothing short 
of a national party whose predominating purpose 
shall be the repeal of all license and revenue laws 
• hat now legalize, sanction, and sustain the traffic 
in State and nation, and the enactment of such fur- 
ther legislation and constitutional amendments as 
shall forever prohil.it the manufacture, importation. 
transportation and sale of all alcoholic liquor for 
beverage purposes, will meet the imperative needs of 

the situation. (This does not preclude the use oi 
alcohol for medicinal, mechanical or sacramental 
purpi is 

With the national government receiving more 
than S200.000.000 from' the liquor traffic out of a to- 
tal annual income of approximately $600,000,000 
with the cities and towns of the nation re- 
ceiving $100,000,000 more from the same source: 
with the liquor traffic so solidly intrenched in both 
tin- Republican and Democratic parties nationally 
that the loss of its support means the hopeless de- 
feat of the party in the national elections (as strik- 
ingly illustrated bv our courageous President who, 
while writing a 30,000-word message to Congress 
covering a multitude of subjects of more or less in- 
terest, did not utter a word upon this sub- 
ject, the most vital of all), with the great bulk of 
the anti-liquor men of the South in the Democratic 
party, and the great majority of the anti-liquor men 
of the North in the Republican party, thus nullify- 
ing each other's political influence nationally ; the 
imperative necessity of such a nation-wide party 
wherein these sympathetic forces may gather seems 
conclusive.. 

The lifelong political prejudices and hatreds grow- 
ing out of the Civil War seem to preclude the possi- 
bility of the Democrats of the South being willing 
to gather within the Republican party to fight the 
liquor traffic, and there is no more hope that the 
Republicans of the North will be willing to gather 
under the Democratic banner for that purpose. 
These facts seem to prove the wisdom and the need 
of the prohibitionists of these two parties meeting 
each other half way and forgetting the things that 
are past, accept the proffered hand of union, and 
march forward together for the protection of home 
and loved ones and country from the accursed liquor 
traffic. 

That half way meeting place is already provided 
in the Prohibition party. A Southern Democrat 
gives up no more and travels no farther than does 
his Northern Republican brother when they meet 
there. The reasons wdiy the Prohibition party is 
available may be briefly summarized: 

1st. It is a national and not a sectional party. 

2nd. It is organized in every state in the Union, 
and its leaders, North and South as well as East and 
West, are thoroughly acquainted with and have 
confidence in each other. 

3rd. It is already supported by hundreds of local 
state and national papers through which all sections 
of the nation can be quickly and thoroughly reached. 

4th. Such a union of forces would immediately 
compel the liquor traffic to concentrate in one op- 
position party. When that is accomplished and 
the prohibition forces are concentrated in the Pro- 
hibition party, there will be but two parties and 
it will be a straight contest between the moral 



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1G 



Pacific Outlook 



forces of the nation on one side, fighting for the 
protection of wife and children and decency and 
morality, against the immoral forces on the other, 
fighting to retain the saloon, the gambling den and 
the house of prostitution, and fighting for greed, 
gain and sensuality; and such a contest would be 
short, sharp and decisive. 

In this connection may I correct two or three 
widely prevalent errors? 

A. The Prohibition party is not a total abstinence 
society. It is a practical political party, organized 
to obtain possession of the state and national gov- 
ernments for the purposes already stated. We 
want votes, and men are welcomed to our ranks 
regardless of whether they are total abstainers or 
not. 

B. It is not a Sunday school or religious move- 
ment, but a broadly patriotic one, and men are wel- 
comed who believe the liquor traffic should be de- 
stroyed, whether they have any religious convictions 
or not. 

In conclusion I desire to emphasize this thought; 
that while the Prohibition party has not elected a 
single governor, yet it has succeeded in electing its 
issue. All substitutes offered, whether low license, 
high license, Gothenburg or dispensary systems, 
have been tried and found wanting, and we are now 
entering a period of prohibition. Place a party in 
power in full and hearty sympathy with the law and 
wonderful results will surely follow. 

A million votes for the Prohibition candidate 
this year will mean the certain reorganization of 
political forces around ths question. There is so 
little real difference between the two old parties this 
year that we feel we have a right to appeal to the 
patriotic and temperance forces to give us their sup- 
port now, even though they may not be fully con- 
vinced of the necessity of doing so permanently. 
* * * 

Literary Notes 

By Pbrez Field 

A recent work by Jeremiah Curtin is called "The 
Mongols : A History." There is an introduction 
by President Roosevelt in which he says, among 
other things : "It is extraordinary to see how ig- 
norant even the best scholars of America and Eng- 
land are of the tremendous importance in world his- 
tory of the nation-shattering Mongol invasions — 
the most stupendous fact of the Thirteenth Century, 
the rise of Genghis Khan and the spread of the Mon- 
gol power from the Yellow sea to the Adriatic and 
the Persian gulf. * * * It is this ignorance, of 
course, accentuated among those who are not schol- 
ars, which accounts for the possibility of such com- 
ically absurd remarks as the one not infrequently 
made at the time of the Japanese-Russian war, that 
for the first time since Salamis, Asia had con- 
quered Europe. As a matter of fact, the recent mili- 
tary supremacy of the white or European races is a 
matter of only some three centuries. For the four 
preceding centuries, that is, from the thirteenth to 
the seventeenth, the Mongol and Turkish armies 
generally had the upper hand in any contest with 
European foes, appearing in Europe always as in- 
vaders, and often as conquerers, while no ruler 
of Europe of their days had to his credit such mighty 
feats of arms, such wide conquests, as Genghis 
Khan, as Timour the Limper, as Bazazet, Selim and 
Amurath, as Baber and Akbar." 

It was, by the way, Akbar who tried so hard 
to collect and to codify, if one may use that term, 




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Pacific Outlook 



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the occult kno ■< his time — an attempt re- 

el by the priesthood, who have not spared this 
rulers reputation on that account. Alter 
likening the Mongol invaders to the American 

tnd Apaches Of the nineteenth fin 

tury." and tracing the spread of their power to Eu- 
rope, the President sums up l>y saying: "Western 
Europe could have no adequate defense, but for- 
tunately by this time the Mongol attack had spent 
itself, simply because tlie distance from the central 

point had become so great. It was no Christian or 
European power which first by force set hounds to 
the Mongol conquests, hut the Turkish mamelukes 
of Egypt in the West and in the East, some two 
score years later, the armies of Japan." 

This volume should he of especial interest to us 
on the Pacific Coast, whence China is only beyond 
the dip of the horizon and whose children we meet 
in daily contact. It is published by Little, I'.rown 
& Co. ' 



The John Lane Company has brought out a book 
by A. M. W. Stirling entitled "Coke of Norfolk 
and his Friends; the life of Thomas William Coke, 
First Earl of Leicester." The career of this man 
has the charm of independence and sincerity. He 
was rich enough not to have to truckle to the pow- 
ers that be for preferment and such ambitions as he 
had were not for place and precedence. It was he 
who moved in the House of Commons "that the in- 
dependence of America should be recognized," and 
who at dawn after a weary night's sitting, found his 
motion carried by a majority of one. Coke having 
been offered a peerage, which he considered a bribe, 
he posted to London from his country place and 
went to see the Duke of Portland, the then minister 
of George IV. The following is related of him. 

"Coke and Sir John Miller found the Duke of 
Portland surrounded by about half a dozen friends, 
who were evidently paying great court to him. Di- 
rectly, however, the duke saw who his fresh visitors 
were, he rose, and hurrying eagerly forward, held 
out both his hands, and welcomed Coke warmly to 
Burlington House. Coke drew back, and amidst 
the sudden silence of those present addressed the 
duke in the following words: 'My lord duke, I 
have come in person to answer your letter and to 
express my astonishment and disgust at your grace's 
believing me capable of selling my principles for a 
peerage ; and I beg to acquaint you that from this 
hour I will never again set my foot within your 
doors. Good morning, my lord.' He then turned 
and quitted the room, leaving the duke confused and 
the rest of the company much astonished at the 
episode." 

These two volumes make excellent reading. So 
many of us are honest from the lack of opportunity 
to rob or from a small appetite that it is refreshing 
to read of a man out of fiction who "dared to live 
largely," as Lucas Malet puts it, and who main- 
tained his integrity throughout a brilliant life. Not 
the least of his merits is that he was a good farmer 
and reclaimed much waste land on his estate. 



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18 



Pacific Outlook 




SOCIETY 



That "Simple" Wedding 

If any of the Los Angeles spring brides contem- 
plate having a "simple" wedding like Gladys Van- 
derbilt's they must not forget the orchids. Gladys 
had thousands of them — they only cost a few dollars 
apiece and greatly emphasized that "dignified sim- 
plicity" the press dispatches mentioned so fre- 
quently. 

An altar cloth of gold, such as was used at this 
ceremony, when Gladys and her millions became the 
bride of the count with the outlandish name, should 
also be provided. Nothing so sweetly simple as a 
cloth of gold throw — that's what a good old Yankee 
would call it. They're cheap and not showy, you 
known. 

And another thing. Don't have too many people. 
Gladys has only three hundred at her wedding; a 
small number like that gives the informal air which 
would be lost if you invited a crowd. 

It would be perfectly lovely, to carry out this idea 
of simplicity that characterized this function, if you 
could get the bridegroom to wear something like 
Count Szechenyi's costume. Any Los Angeles 
tailor could get up a suit quiet and subdued like his 
for a song. The success of a costume of this sort, 
it should be borne in mind, on account of its very 
modesty, depends upon its perfect fit. Otherwise 
the whole thing would be a chromatic orgy. Here 
is a description of it appended for the benefit of any 
sensible young couple who would like to pattern 
after this quiet wedding: 

"His tight-fitting coat was of pale gray Cashmere, 
as smooth as finest satin and slashed with bands of 
brilliant braid. From his shoulders hung a mantle 
of Astrakhan fur that fell to his waist. His trousers 
— skin tight — were bright red in color, and vanished 
at the knees into a pair of tasseled boots that 
gleamed under the electric lights like carvings in 
jet. 

"At his hip hung a sword, curved like a scimiter ; 
its hilt gleaming with gold and jewels. In his left 
hand the bride-groom held his shako, gleaming 
white, and crested with a pompon a foot high." 

Don't forget the pompon ! 




Those Assembly Bouquets ! 

Painfully batting one eye while he tried to see 
out of the other, a man stood in a corner at Kramer's 
Tuesday night looking out in bewilderment over the 
maze of dancers. He wore a sort of a "who-hit-me?" 
expression. Another man came up rubbing an im- 
aginary scratch on his cheek. They had both with- 
drawn from the firing-line, which was the floor, 
where the women were doing terrible execution 
with the huge bouquets they carried while dancing. 

"Look out!" warned the one of the injured eye. 
The other dodged, but not in time to miss a swat — 
bad English but that is just what he received — on 
his other cheek from a whirling beauty in pink chif- 
fon, whose weapon was a bunch of American Beau- 
ties held at arm's length while she waltzed. 

"A woman looks all right with an armful of flow- 



ers," grumbled the victim", "but I'll be blessed if I 
can see the sense in trying to dance and carry a flor- 
al cascade. My nerves are going to pieces from the 
dodging I've had to do." 

_ "I'll cease to be a dancing-man and return to 
tiddledy-winks if it keeps up," said the other, sav- 
agely. "Who started the blooming fad, anyhow?" 

There were other complaints, mostly from the 
men, at the Assembly, where the new fashion first 
.manifested itself in local society. The bouquets 
were enormous, of all kinds of flowers, and some 
were built like bridal pieces, in shower effect, trail- 
ing to the floor. American Beauties predominated, 
and it was really no joke — dodging the flower bear- 
ers. The petals fell on the floor, of course, and that 
did not add any to the pleasure of dancing. 

Otherwise the Assembly was the most successful 
of the season. There were many beautiful women in 
exquisite costumes and the appointments could not 
have been better. The supper was especially well 
ordered. The hosts and hostesses were Dr. and 
Mrs. Ernest A. Bryant, Mr. and Mrs. Allan C. Balch, 
Mr. and Mrs. George J. Denis, Mr. and 'Mrs. W. E. 
Dunn, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Bixby and Count and 
Mrs. Jaro von Schmidt. 

The last assembly will be held in March and will 
be a Mardi Gras. 



Knights of Columbus Ball 

An affair at which the flower of Catholic society 
figured was the annual ball given last Monday night 
by the Knights of Columbus. The entire upper 
floor of Levy's cafe was used for the dancing and 
supper was served at the conclusion. There were 
fully two hundred present in spite of its being a 
rainy night. 

Joseph Scott was most active in working for the 
success of the event and he was ably assisted by the 
following men: C. C. Desmond, John P. Burke, 
Leo J. Maguire, M. J. McGarry, Arthur Mullen, 
Charles L. Whipple, P. W. Croake, Charles A. King, 
D. J. Coyne, PI. A. Formaneck, Carrell J. Daly and 
Charles E. Schilling. 

The reception committee was: R. J. Dillon, W. 
R. Burke, John G. Mott, John H. Clancy, John H. 
Alton, Dr. J. A. McGarry, Martin C. Marsh, I. B. 
Dockweiler, J. E. Arnoldy, John P. Coyne, J J. 
Doran, J. J. Bergin, Dr. A. Burkelman, James M. 
Lynch, John F. Howard, Dr. P. G. Cotter, A. I. 
McCormick, Dr. W. R. Molony, Dr. P. O. Dough- 
erty, Dr. A. J. Scholl, Carl Leonardt, Eugene Mc- 
Laughlin, P. J. McDonald, Thomas J. Cunningham, 
J. A. Hancock, John R. Grant and Joseph W. 
Lynch. 

Leo J. Maguire was floor director, and assisting 
him were C. B. Bergin, Henry Daly, E. G. Durnerin, 
Walter J. Goldsmith, J. F. McElheney, H. C. Lim- 
brock, Charles A. King, C. J. McGarry, J. P. De- 
laney, Phil O'Brien, P. J. McGarry, J. H. Le Sage, 
Lewis A. Kerwin, James D. Irwin, James J. Gee, 
Jr., W. E. Lanigan, George P. Green, Thomas F. 
Fitzgerald, G. A. Howard, James F. Breen, Thomas 



Pacific Outlook 



19 



F. Griffii Grelek, J. E. Harmon, A. J. 

O'Rourki E. Quigley and W. J. Hanlon. 



Literary Tea 
Mrs. Alfred Dudley Cheshire, recently of San 
Francisco, was the gfuest of hon ir at a tea given 
Tuesday afternoon by Mrs. Frederick A. Miller in 

her apartments at the Loomis. The hostess was 
assisted by Mrs. Ethel Bennett and Miss Martha 
Hankins. The reading of impromptu literary com- 
positions by the uiic-ts composed the entertainment 
for the afternoon. Those present were: Mmes. 
George Drake Ruddy, F. L. Drenneu, Julia M. 
Phelps of Pasadena. Una Xixon Hopkins, Frederick 
Immen of Grand Rapids, Mich., Fred Bacon, Frnest 
(). Woodruff. Long Beach; \Y. H. Tow'nsend, 
Hollywood; Alfred Ottaway, E. C. Slosson and 
Alice Castillo of Monrovia; Richard Poor, George 
Barry, Attie A. Stowe, Mary A. Bowman, Dvvight 
Satterlee, Ethel Bennett, Mary White Hickox. Ab- 
ner Fry, Ralph Ff. Bates, Helen Edmunds, J. K. 
Van Sant. Elton R. Wolcott, Katherine Dake, Har- 
riet Myers, Evans, Misses Martha Hankins, Marie 
Lane of Seattle, Bertha L. Corbett, Agnes Wood- 
ward. Mae Glashan, Grace Bates, Wilma Bennett, 
Abbie Fry, Bassett and Frsula Cheshire. 



Breakfast and Box Party 

Mrs. Frank Pixley was hostess Thursday at a 
breakfast at the Alexandria followed by a box party 
at the Belasco, which was given for Miss Kate Ma- 
comber of Des Moines, la., who is visiting her 
brother and sister-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Kingsley 
Macomber in Pasadena. The other guests were 
Miss Marion MacGilvray of Pasadena, Mrs. Karl 
Sargent and Mrs. Cosmo Morgan. 



Mrs. Ella Wheeler Wilcox, the poetess of the 
Hearst papers, was given a parting send-off by her 
admirers, in a large reception last Monday at the 
Hotel Lankershim, that was quite in keeping with 
the many other brilliant affairs arranged in her 
honor that have marked the past two or three 
months. This reception was to bid Mrs. Wilcox and 
her. husband godspeed on their journey to Hono- 
lulu, on which they started Wednesday. Mr. and 
Mrs. Wilcox will not return to Los Angeles this 
season. Assisting in receiving were Madame C. M. 
Severance, Mrs. Edward Davis, Mrs. John W. 
Mitchell and Mrs. George Drake Ruddy. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. P. Ripley have come to Pasadena 
for two months and are being entertained by the 
elect of the Crown City. Friday of last week Mrs. 
George Harris of Bellefontaine street, gave a din- 
ner party in their honor. They have been staying 
at the Raymond, but before their departure for the 
East will be the guests for a few weeks of Mr. and 
Mrs. Hampton L. Story at their Pasadena villa. 
The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Story's daughter to 
Robert Harris Ripley, son of the Santa Fe presi- 
dent, was one of the society events in Pasadena 
three years ago. 

A new singer has come to Los Angeles to make 
her home, Mrs. Lillian Ballagh, soprano, recently of 
Chicago. Mrs. Ballagh was obliged to give up the 
concert career in which she had won no little suc- 
cess in the Middle West, to come to California for 
the benefit of the health of one of the members of 
her family. 

Mrs. Frederick Webb, 1002 South Bonnie Brae 
street, entertained at the Belasco with a box party 



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Pacific Outlook 



followed by a luncheon at Christopher's. The 
guests included Mrs. M„ F. Van Horn, Miss Sadie 
Van Horn, Mrs. Charles H. White, Mrs. N. R. Mar- 
tin, Mrs. Charles H. Fayram, Mrs. Thomas F. Fitz- 
gerald, Mrs. Grove Ketchum, Mrs. John W. Mona- 
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ham, Miss Bingham, Mrs. James F. Moses, Mrs. W. 
W. Elliott, Mrs. C. J. Balfour, Mrs. A. P. Yerington, 
Mrs. A. A. Polhamus and Miss Helen Henschel. 

Mrs. George Denis, who with Miss Alberta re- 
cently returned from a European trip, has taken 
possession of her new home on Westlake avenue. 
Before going abroad the family made their home at 
the Van Nuys hotel. Sunday evening Mr. and Mrs. 
Denis gave an informal dinner party for Miss Alice 
Denis and Edmund Denis of New Orleans, sister 
and brother of Mr. Denis. The others at table were 
Mr. and Mrs. Randolph Miner, Mr. and Mrs. Han- 
cock Banning, Miss Alberta Denis, Mr. Newlin and 
Boris de Londonier. 

Wednesday evening Miss Selma Goebel, daughter 
of Mrs. Rose Goebel, 200 West Fortieth street, was 
married to Albert Gibbons Harper, brother of Mayor 
Harper. The ceremony was a quiet home affair. 
Rev. E. J. Harper officiated. After a wedding trip 
Mr. and Mrs. Harper will be at home in Hollywood. 

Miss Inez Ray, who is to be married Feb. 22 to 
Paul Works of Philadelphia, was the guest of honor 
at a tea Wednesday afternoon, given by Miss Flor- 
ence Clark, 2629 Van Buren Place. Thursday Mrs. 
G. I. Cochran and Mrs. Walter Comstock gave a 
box party at the Belasco for her. 

Mrs. Harmon David Ryus gave a violet luncheon 
recently at the Jonathan Club to a few women of 
artistic turn. Her guests were Mrs. William Bayly, 
Mrs. Edward L. Doheny, Mrs. Lillian Burkhart 
Goldsmith, Mrs. Dick Ferris, Mrs. Frank Goldsmith 
and Mrs. Hays. 

Mrs. Hancock Banning gave an informal tea to 
about one hundred of the younger set last Saturday 
in honor of Mr. Banning's cousin, Miss Mabel Horn 
of St. Paul, who is visiting at the Melius home, and 
Miss Alberta Denis. Mrs. Banning will soon have 
Miss Horn with her for a visit. 

Miss Adela Verne, who is having all kinds of at- 
tentions paid her by society during her stay here, 
was a guest last week at a dinner given by Mr. and 
Mrs. W. A. Clark, Jr., at their West Adams street 
home. Mr. and Mrs. Clark are entertaining Mr. and 
Mrs. C. L. Monsch of Lexington, Ky. 

Boris de Londonier will entertain Adela Verne, 
the celebrated English pianist, and Stanley Josling, 
the well known miniature painter of London, with a 
tea and musicale Saturday afternoon, Feb. 8, at four 
o'clock, at No. 922J4 South Hope street. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cosmo Morgan entertained at din- 
ner last Friday night in honor of that whimsical 
genius, Frank Pixley, maker of comic opera suc- 
cesses, and Mrs. Pixley, who are guests at the Alex- 
andria. 

Mrs. E. Avery McCarthy entertained Monday 
afternoon at bridge whist at the home of her mother, 
Mrs. A. J. Howard, 1540 Wilton Place. 

A tea will be given Sunday afternoon by the 
Dominant club in honor of Miss Adela Verne, the 
English pianist. 

Mrs. Katherine Greenleaf Locke is leaving for 
New York the first of February. 





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21 



AMONG THE WOMEN'S CLUBS 



Ruskin Art 

"Different Interpretations of the Engraver and 
the Etcher," was the subject of Hector AlllOt's in- 
structive talk before the Ruskin Art Wednesday. 
Thursday the anniversary of Knskin's birthday was 

observed by a tea given to the club members and a 

few others by Miss A. E. Wadleigh and Mrs. Geo. 
II. Wadleigh at the home of the latter. 1515 South 
Hope St. The annual observance of their patron 
philosopher's birthday has not been neglected since 
the club was first organized. The date falls on Feb. 
8, but it was found more convenient this year to 
have the celebration a little earlier. Mrs. W. J. 
Saunders added great interest to the short pro- 
gramme that was presented by telling of traditions 
of the Ruskin family, never printed. Her grand- 
mother and the mother of Ruskin were friends and 
the two had exchanged teapots and during her talk 
she showed a precious urn that Mrs. Ruskin had 
used. 

Mrs. W. H. Miles, who has been photographing 
young birds in their nests, showed some of the re- 
sults of her adventures with her camera and told 
how she accomplished the difficult feats. The host- 
ess had on exhibition some of the pictures of Mr. 
Borg, who is going to Santa Barbara soon. Mrs. 
Herman Smith and Mrs. W. J. Chambers assisted 
and the following young girls, daughters of mem- 
bers, helped serve : Misses Ruth Hutchison, Allen 
Bullis and Eleanor ^ r alls. 



Ebell Club 

An afternoon of pure delight was provided for the 
Ebell Club last Monday by Mrs. Edwin G. Voight 
and Mrs. Marion Welsh, who arranged the musical 
programme that took the place of the usual lecture 
and study session. A newcomer, Mrs. Lucian Caen, 
recently from Germany, a contralto of charming tal- 
ent, proved the most attractive feature of the pro- 
gramme, wholly excellent. Mrs. Caen sang beautiful- 
ly. Her voice is of most pleasing quality, of wide 
range and well controlled. With it she has an unusual 
dramatic power that enables her to reach the emo- 
tions of her hearers and play on them at will. Two 
Strauss songs were among her numbers. 

A quartette composed of Mrs. Robert Wankowski, 
Mrs. Marie Welsh, Mrs. Mary Schallert and Mrs. 
Elizabeth Fonda, sang "The Seasons," by Hawley; 
a lullabv by Nordlinger and an arrangement of 
"Robin "Adair," by Dudley Buck. Mrs. Voight 
played three piano selections. Mrs. Sidney Webb 
contributed two violin solos and Mrs. Fred Lang 
gave a reading. 

Highland Park Ebell 

In spite of the rain, Mrs. Emma Greenleaf Locke 
drew a good crowd at the meeting of the Highland 
Park Ebell Tuesday, to hear her tell of the broken- 
hearted Josephine and the faithless Napoleon. Her 
lecture, which is called "The Fate of an Empress," 
was full of interest to the audience, Josephine's sad 
story rousing the never-failing 'sympathies of the 
women, as the history of her rejected love never 
fails to do. After the lecture the members of the 
executive board were entertained at luncheon by 
Mrs. Frank Colby at her home, 335 West Avenue 
52. where the afternoon was pleasantly passed in 



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22 



Pacific Outlook 



listening to a programme of music the hostess had 
arranged. 



UNDER THE SKYLIGHTS 



Political Equality 

Lack of space this week will not permit the print- 
ing of Mrs. Elizabeth Baker Bohan's paper on the 
"Finland Movement,'' which she read at the last 
meeting of the Political Equality Club in the Wo- 
man's Clubhouse. It was considered one of the best 
meetings the organization has yet held, and the able 
manner in which Mrs. Bohan handled her subject 
occasioned much favorable comment. It has been 
decided to print the paper in pamphlet form to use 
in the propaganda for equal suffrage. Several new 
faces were seen in the gathering and some of the 
re.cent comers made interesting speeches in the 
discussion that followed the reading of the paper. 



Friday Morning 

On account of the light attendance, due to the 
pouring rain, the talk on Oriental rugs by H. M. 




Mrs. Otie Chew Becker, who played before the 
Friday Morning Club during the week 

Khazoyan was postponed Tuesday afternoon and 
given Friday afternoon instead. A beautiful collec- 
tion of Persian rugs was exhibited and the history 
of the evolution and significance of the weaver's art 
was interestingly told. 

In the morning Mr. and Mrs. Thilo Becker gave a 
programme of piano and violin music. 

* * * 

Not in California 

Two ladies who had not seen each other for years 
met in the street. They recognized each other after a 
time, and their recognition was cordial. "So delighted 
to see you again. Why, you are scarcely altered." 
"So glad; and how long is it since we met?" "About 
ten years." "And why have you never been to see 
me?" "My dear, just look at the weather we have 
had." 



By Perez Field. 

At the Hotel Maryland in Pasadena there is a pri- 
vate collection of pictures and other art objects be- 
longing to Mrs. E. H. A. Schultz which is offered 
for sale and which will remain there until Feb. 5. 
There are all sorts of things in this collection from 
tapestries and pictures to rugs and snuff boxes. 
Whatever a collector's penchant may be, he will be 
more than likely to find something in this assort- 
ment of curios to please his taste. Some of the rugs 
are beautiful, and the tapestries have a rare interest. 
There are many other objects, some of historic 
value, some merely curious and others very beauti- 
ful, so that a visit to the rooms where they are 
shown is quite worth while. 

Of pictures, there are about sixteen, mostly of the 
Flemish and Dutch schools. They are particularly 
interesting to the student of art, showing, as they 
do, the way in which the older painters did things. 
It is a pity that they cannot be in a public museum, 
or at least that some of them cannot. If a nucleus 
for a local gallery were wanted some of these pic- 
tures would serve the purpose admirably. While 
not by the greatest masters, they are good examples 
of how other times looked at nature, points of view 
it does us well to examine from time to time. Let 
us hope that some of them may remain in Southern 
California at any rate, even if it be impossible to 
procure them for a public gallery. 

One of the most interesting pictures among them 
is the "Descent from the Cross" by Lucas van Lei- 
den (1494-1533) who was one of the well known 
painters of the early Flemish school. There are not 
many of his paintings in existence. This one is 
well preserved and gives one a good idea of the relig- 
ious pictures of that early period. The background 
reminds one of the Madonna by Van Eyck which 
used to hang in the salle carre of the Louvre and 
which is now so badly placed in a small room back 
of the large Marie de Medici pictures by Rubens. 
Van Leiden was very popular in his day, having 
made many engravings which were skillfully done 
and of which about 179 have come down to us. 
One of his pictures, called "The Card Party," is 
owned by the Earl of Pembroke and hangs in Wil- 
ton House. His most famous work is the "Last 
judgment," in the town hall of Leiden. In the 
British museum is "The Dance of the Magdalen." 
Van Leiden's work lacks somewhat the elevation 
of tone of Van Eyck, but is nevertheless full of 
charm and native detail at which one always smiles. 
In the foreground of "The Descent from the Cross" 
may be seen the nails and hammer and the wrench 
with which the nails were withdrawn. The figure 
of Jesus is supported by St. John in red, while the 
Virgin Mother bends over her son arrayed in the 
symbolical blue in which she is always dressed. At 
the feet of the Lord kneels the figure of Mary Maga- 
len with her pot of ointment. The Virgin Mother 
removes the crown of thorns from the brow of the 
Christ, seven thorns remaining broken off in the 
flesh. In a cave at the back may be seen some fig- 
ures which may be taken for the apostles, or for 
those who disputed the raiment of the Savior after 
His crucifixion. Ignorant of modern perspective, 
the artist has introduced what he wished into his 
canvas and thus is able to tell a complete story. The 
art of the Low Countries was for the most part not 



Pacific Outlook 



23 



an inspire.! one. Heavenly themes became of the 
earth, earthy, and while their color and detail arc 
often marvelous, their work remains comfortable. 

The style of this picture is archaic and the interest 

in it perhaps more antiquarian than aesthetic; never- 
theless, it suggests many things, grass grown 
squares, a burgher's pomp and a practical religion 
which reads humanity in heaven and at hand. 

"Still Life," by William Claaz Heda (1594-1678) 
is a good example of its class, the napery being 
very well done. 

"Banks of the River" is an excellent example of 
the work of Salomon Ruisdael (1600-1670). The 
distant, low banks of the river are well brought out, 
and in this picture one realizes how dependent the 
painters of those tlat lands are on sky effects. If 
must always lie the dominant feature in any of their 
out-door work, and its very extent must lead them 
to seek the limitations of an interior, of firesides and 
of a pot of beer. 

There are two portraits by Ter Borch (1613-1681). 
If they are husband and wife they neither of them 
married beauties, but they may have been happy for 
all that. The hair and lace work are worked out in 
great detail and the man apparently had a mind of 
his own. 

"Courtship." by Adriaan Van Ostade (1610-1685), 
is as good a bit of color as any. It is rather sketchy 
and represents a happy fellow with pipe in hand and 
mug on table trying to steal man's necessary nectar 
from the lips of an only-waiting-to-be-further- 
pressed lady. It is a jolly picture. Asceticism did 
not tarry long in Dutch studios. 

"The Musicians," by Govaert Flinck, is a well 
grouped trio, a woman playing a guitar, while two 
men listen to her.- The light in this picture is finely 
handled and the tones are rich and decorative. 

There are other pictures of interest, among them 
works by Van der Heist, Van der Velde, Van Beyer- 
en, Cuyp, Van der Does, and Martens. This week 
we reproduce a picture by Van Leiden. 



George H. Mellen has "lately opened a studio in 
the Blanchard building, where he works in modeled 
leather, an art which has heretofore been chiefly de- 
voted to bookbinding. Mr. Mellen is from Boston. 
He passed one winter in San Francisco and one in 
Mexico, where he went to study the leather work of 
the Franciscan monks. He had many difficulties to 
encounter before he was able to reach his present 
skill. Not the least of his troubles has been that he 
is more or less of a pioneer in trying to use shaded 
color and fine modeling in his work. The latter is a 
task beyond patience, as the leather yields and 
shrinks under the modeler's tool. Only by repeated 
efforts can anything worth while be accomplished 
in this laborious art. The success of this artist has 
been achieved apparently by a dogged determination 
to overcome the limitations inherent in his craft and 
thus to externalize somewhat of his ideals. The 
articles which he has in his studio show a great va- 
riety of blended color, from the major yet soft reds 
and greens to the quieter and less dominant blues 
and violets, those tones which seem to lead the im- 
agination to the portals of a mysterious Eden, half 
feared, half hoped for. His coloring is harmonious 
and attractive. Many of his designs are taken from 
Apache or other Indian motives. Fortunately his 
work has at once met with the recognition which it 
deserves. The design on a bag which he is about 



to send to Toronto is particularly pleasing, Being 
of a graceful symmetrical design, it appeals to what 
we believe to be the d minant note in the taste of 

the hour: that is. a desire for a ii.it too rigid con- 
ventionality. I he exuberant freedom and even ar- 
tistic license of the past century now seek the refuge 
01 a formal outline and a flat tint to curb the crudi- 
ties of unselected expression and to concentrate ran- 
dom impulses. A systematized treatment does awa\ 
with eccentricities, the vaunted value of romanti- 
cism in art being the glorification of unregulated 
sports of fancy, the prizing of illplaced lumps of 
imagination. Mr. Mellen is a sane, 'cheerful and 
practical craftsman whose work embodies a sense 
of well being and satisfaction which ought to be 
communicable to the wearer of any portion of it. 



Art Briefs 

The Art League will meet next Wednesday after- 
noon at four o'clock in the Ruskin Art rooms to 




"The Descent from the Cross" 

By Lucas van Leiden. Picture now at Pasadena 

discuss plans for the inclusion of all the arts in the 
work of the society. 

Joseph Greenbaum is painting a portrait of Henry 
Greenbaum of Chicago, a man well known among 
philanthropists. 

Just at this time Stanley Josling is painting a 
miniature of Mrs. Randolph Miner which promises 
to be full of charm and witching grace. He has 
nearly finished one of Mrs. Dora Chase Smith which 
is singularly happy in its expression of serenity. He 
has also painted a miniature of Mrs. Wellington 
Rand, a delightful study of illusive qualities subtly 
suggested. 

Mrs. M. E. Perley, whose studio is in the Blanch- 
ard building, produced the names on the mugs which 
the Gamut Club gave to its guests last week. The 
guests were Mr. and Mrs. Josef Hofmann. M. Fro- 
mani and Mine. Zelie de Lussan. Mrs. Perlev is 
busy just now designing vases for some of her for- 
mer pupils in San Francisco. 

The demand for good draughtsmanship is not 
confined to the fine arts alone, as is shown by the 



24 



Pacific Outlook 



many cleverly designed folders which advertise 
cheap railroad rates or commercial advantages. If 
Sir Joshua Reynolds helps to make a certain brand 
of cocoa notorious, there is no reason why less well 
known masters of line and color should not get ex- 
cellent training in the same way. Some recent 
sketches by J. Paul Burnham for an out-of-town 
hotel evince a good deal of dexterity. This sort of 
work reaches a vast number of people, and when of 
the right kind, as Burnham's and Barndollar's seems 
to be, it far outreaches in effect the more patrician 
oil painting, closeted in lordly halls beyond the ken 
of those rattling incivilities we wrongly call demo- 
cratic. 

The Museum of the Hispanic Society of America 
was opened last week in New York. The society 
was founded by Archer M. Huntington, son of the 
late Collis P. Huntington, who gave the land upon 
which the museum is built. The object of the so- 
ciety is to bring the American people in closer touch 
with the Spanish and Portuguese peoples of South 
America and of Europe. The Museum is on 156th 
street. 

"Hiawatha," a statue done in marble by St. Gau- 
dens, has been lost from the Metropolitan Museum, 
New York, and is advertised for by the authorities. 
It is a rather droll idea, this misplacing of a 
ton and not knowing precisely where it is. 

There will be an exhibition of craftsman jewelry 
at Miss Grace Nickelson's gallery in Pasadena dur- 
ing the first week in February. 

Bertha Corbett, who has been smothering babies 
in sunbonnets and attractiveness on the printed page 
for the last few years, is visiting Los Angeles, 
where babies, if they need any covering at all on 
their heads, may safely call their headgear "sun" 
bonnets. 

Hector Alliot lectured last Tuesday at the Shakes- 
peare Club in Pasadena, where he is conducting a 
series of talks on art. 

C. P. Neilson was in town last Saturday. He is 
painting some large canvases at San Gabriel. 

Miss Nona White will show some of her recent 
water colors at the Woman's Club house in about a 
fortnight. She has many new sketches in her studio 
in Blanchard Hall. 

* * * 

He Guessed Wrong 

It is said that the Poetess of Passion demonstrated . 
her temperamental qualities in a most decisive man- 
ner at a recent local gathering of select spirits. The 
cause for the temper (amental) outburst from the 
lady was a remark addressed to her by a prominent 
and usually diplomatic gentleman of Los Angeles, 
who, in attempting to be pleasantly facetious and at 
the same time to inform himself on the puzzling- 
question of how to classify the emotional celebrity's 
husband, inquired : 

"I suppose it would be eminently proper to call 
the fortunate husband of such a notable lady as 
yourself 'Mr. Ella Wheeler Wilcox?'" 

The answer he received is reported to have been 
delivered in that warmly temperamental manner 
which made him lamentably aware that he had per- 
petrated an undiplomatic joke and hazarded a wrong 
guess. 

* * * 

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Pacific Outlook 



25 




The Week's Music Reviewed 

Frank V. Pollock, the well known tenor, appeared 
in a song recital Monday night in Santa Monica un- 
der the auspices of the Woman's Club of that place. 
Mr. Pollock, who was a member of the Metropolitan 
Operahouse of New York, which organization he 
left two years ago on account of ill health, has im- 
proved wonderfully in the climate of Southern 
California, as we had occasion to judge from his re- 
cital Monday, for his magnificent voice never was 
heard here to better advantage. 

It is rare to find on opera singer whose interpreta- 
tive ability is as versatile as that of Mr. Pollock, 
and who combines all the good qualities in so 
strongly' developed a measure as an interpreter of 
songs as well as as an opera singer. In possession 
of one of the most beautiful voices of a pure and 
warm timbre, he interprets the great masters with an 
intelligence and understanding which demonstrates 
the great artist. Very seldom is such perfect enun- 
ciation heard in French or Italian from any Anglo- 
Saxon as was delivered by Mr. Pollock. 

The arias from "Carmen," "Rigoletto," and 
''L'Elisire d' Amore," gave opportunity for the dis- 
play of the extraordinary power of his remarkable 
vocal organ, and Mr. Pollock executes them with a 
temperament, phrase and voice color which show 
distinctly the master in the art of singing. 

The German and French selections gave Mr. Pol- 
lock opportunity to display his ability as a song 
interpreter. He controlled them vocally with per- 
fect voice, production and enunciated them with a 
simplicity which distinctly showed the musician of 
taste. 

Mrs. Harry B. Goodwin, who presided at the 
piano, is a musician with rare gifts and accom- 
panied the singer with a skill and ability and with 
the rhythm and refined touch of an unusual talent. 
It is to be hoped that the people of Los Angeles 
will have an opportunity to hear Mr. Pollock in con- 
cert before he returns to New York. 

The following was the complete programme of the 
evening: 

PART I 
i. Ini wunderschonen Monat Mai 

2. Aus meinen Thrancn spriessen 

I Fn mi Diccliterliebe) 

3. Si me? vers avaient des ailes 

4. Sonnet d'Amour 

5. Una Furtiva Lagrima 

(From the Opera l'Elisirc d'Amore) 
PART II 

6. At Parting 

7. Thy Beaming Eyes . . 

8. La Fleur que tu m'avais jetee 

(From the Opera "Carmen") 
g. La Donna e Mobile .... 

PART III 

10. In Bygone Days 

11. Nocturne 

12. Du Bisl Wie Eine Plume 

13. The Year's at the Spring 



Schumann 
Schumann 

R. Hahn 

Thome 

Donizetti 



Rogers 

MacDim ell 

Bizet 

Verdi 

Chadwick 

Chadwick 

Chadwick 

Mrs. Beach 



After an absence of two years Josef Hofmann 
appeared here again in recital at Simpson Audi- 
torium Thursday night, Jan 25, and demonstrated 
on that occasion that he begins to take the lead of 
the world-great pianists. If Hofmann continues to 
grow in his work as he has in the past two years, 
he soon will not have an equal. 

As a technician, he is alone now, as such evenness 
and faithlessness in technique we have not yet had 
the chance to admire to such an extent in anyone 
else as in Hofmann ; and if we do not agree, perhaps, 
in his conception of Beethoven on account of his 
modernizing him, Hofmann is too much of an artist 
and musician to be open to advice in the matter 
from any living critic, as his ideas and tastes of 
interpretation are more cultured and developed than 
those of any of the living musical critics. His mod- 
ernized interpretation of Beethoven is with him only 
a matter of taste, and not lack of knowledge ; and so 
it is not a matter for criticism. He is above it. 

In the B Minor Sonata by Chopin, Hofmann dis- 
played an indisputable and unapproachable great- 
ness. Not one of his great confreres ever ap- 
proached the spirit of Chopin in this Sonata so 
closely in character and sentiment, and perhaps none 
ever will, as did Hofmann on that remarkable night. 

The music lovers and admirers of Chopin may 
consider themselves lucky to : have had a chance to 
listen to so divine a conception of this Sonata. To 
please,, probably, the "Wild West," Hofmann gave 
us the Legend by Liszt, "St. Francis Walking on 
the Waves." We may call it anything rather than 
a legend, as a legend has sentiment, charm and poe- 
try, and Liszt's composition is nothing else than a 
senseless, chromatique, pounding fantasy, uninter- 
esting, tiresome and unworthy the programme of a 
Hofmann. 

The "Campanella," by Liszt, the closing number, 
gave Hofmann an opportunity to display his marvel- 
ous brio in octaves staccati and his supernatural 
technique. 



Jan Kubelik appeared at Simpson Auditorium 
Tuesday night, Jan. 28, before a crowded house and 
scored a great and well deserved success with his 
violin. His performance of the Sinding Concerto 
was technically marvelous. His flawless bowing 
draws a tone as pure and clean as crystal, and his 
phrasing of it was full of distinction and thought. 

Kubelik's ability as a violinist is indisputable, as 
far as technique is considered, and we may dutifully 
bow to his mastery, in spite of the fact that he does 
not satisfy our soul, as depth and temperament are 
qualities which we fail to discover in him. 

Kubelik is a genius we admire and wdio thrills his 
listeners with his perfection, but he neither touches 
nor impresses deeply. 

Miss Berthe Roy, who assisted in the concert as 



26 



Pacific Outlook 



solo-pianist, is not yet fitted for concert work, and if 
she ever will be fitted for it is very doubtful, as she 
is lacking entirely in the qualities of a pianist. Senti- 
ment, rhythm, temperament, phrase, etc., are un- 
known to this performer, and such unfinished piano 
playing has not yet been heard here from a touring 
musician. 

Mr. Schwab accompanied the violinist very well 
indeed at times, and would have been acceptable if 
he had not tried to overreach his position as an ac- 
companist. He tried to rival the soloist, which made 
him noisy and in bad taste. 

VERO. 



The Dog in Luck 

It should be a matter of no small satisfaction to 
that large portion of the Los Angeles public inter- 
ested in the theater, that this youthful city way out 
in the western "provinces" (it is a great capital in 
our eyes, of course, but the Overprouds from New 
York tell us that hayseeds are still visible in our 
hair) has been chosen as the target for so many pre- 
miers this winter. Of course, the Overprouds are 
careful to impress upon us that firing off new plays 
here is merely a matter of "trying it on the dog 
first;" but after all, as long as we are classed in the 
kennels, isn't it more exciting and agreeable to have 
fresh dramatic concoctions tried on us first, than to 
have stale ones thrown out to us through New 
York's back door? 

A delightful sense of expectancy steals over us as 
we swallow untested potions, and these expectant 
moments must perforce give us some importance, 
while they last, even in the eyes of the capital of 
theaterdom ; for it cannot help but be interesting — 
indeed, -it must be quite intensely interesting (for 
the moment only, of course) — to see whether the 
new dope kills the dog, or merely causes him to 
throw a fit, or really inspires him to leap about on 
his hind legs and yowl for pure joy. It is conceded 
in the capital of art over there in the east that it is 
no difficult matter to exhilarate the D.og to the 
point of hind leg dances and joy yowls, for constant 
hunger for theatrical good things keeps his stomach 
empty and susceptible ; but it is admitted that if the 
effects of the new play keep the pup up to a high 
pitch of exhilaration for, say, a week running with- 
out exhausting him, then the prescription is worth 
trying on the less susceptible critics of a real city — 
beg pardon, the real city. 

Yes, so long as we can't be New York, in the mat- 
ter of dramatics, we are willing to be its clinical sub- 
ject. This weeks dose certainly tasted "like more"; 
and we have several coming to us yet. 

"Commencement Days," a play of girls' college life 
by Margaret Mayo and Virginia Frame, received its 
premier at the Belasco Monday night. This is a 
wholesome, rollicking comedy of girlish glee, with 
just enough girlish sorrow interlaced with the light- 
er fabric to give the plot stability and to make the 
characters really and lovably human. The move- 
ment is brisk throughout, the situations expand 
with smooth, logical sequence, there is a fairly dra- 
matic climax, which, while not strikingly intense, 
seems adequate, for it hardly would be in keeping 
with the effervescent spirit of the play to turn it sud- 
denly into genuine tragedy ; and there are scenes 
sufficiently piquant (take, for example, the conclu- 
sion of the first act, where a half, dozen or more of 
the pretty girls of Colton College are gathered in 
Lorraine's .room "after hours," doing high jinks in 



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PHOTOGRAPHER... 



Pacific Outlook 



27 



their dressing gowns ami finally disappearing under 
beds and tallies at the approach of an awakened 
teacher) to give /est to a very simple story. 

"Commencement Days" is not a great play, bul it 
is delightfully original in its setting, and the plot, 

while simple in the extreme and perfectly obvi- 
ous throughout, is developed with such technical 

skill on the part of the playwright and with such a 
tine sense for refreshing, untainted, out-and-out fun 
(with hardly a touch of farce) that the auditor is 
borne along uninterruptedly by its buoyant move- 
ment with iut any conscious effort on his own part. 
It is a sweet, simple little play, most tastefully sea- 
soned and garnished. Judging it from the standpoint 
of \\ estern taste — the standpoint of a mere provin- 
cial of course! — we would say that "Commencement 
Days," if it always can be put on as well as the local 
Belasco organization has put on its first production, 
has a mighty good chance of a successful future. 
What its chances are of impressing the New York 
type of dramatic consciousness is best known to the 
New York theatrical managers who witnessed the 
Los Angeles production this week. 

This new play is well handled by the Belasco 
players. The company is strikingly well cast in the 
various characters of "Commencement Days," and 
while the enactment of these roles does not call for 
any tremendous histrionic efforts, still, they all play 
so intelligently into each other's parts that, as a 
whole, they produce a finely finished effect. 

The most peculiar feature of the play is its re- 
quirement that real twins appear in the cast. It 
was not possible to stage the work until Manager 
Blackwood discovered the Misses Genevieve and 
Erminie De Lacour, two very pretty San Diego 
twin sisters, who already had had sufficient stage 
experience to make them eligible for the twin roles 
of "Emma Lou" and "Teddy" in the long deferred 
production of "Commencement Days." It is quite 
a novel sight to see these pretty sisters on the stage 
together, and they both carry their girlish parts 
quite nicely. Some of the most interesting situ- 
ations of the play are built around these two. 

We never have seen Miss Emmet look so attrac- 
tive as she does in the part of Kate Wells "President 
of the Senior Class," and she handles the dramatic 
situations of the plot, which center chiefly on her, 
with her usual refined intelligence. Florence Smythe 
is seen in the part of the unfortunate Lorraine 
Douglas, whose unwise devotion to her rascally 
voting brother, played by Charles Ruggles, is the 
cause of the entanglements which constitute the 
foundation of the story. 

Dorothy Bernard is noticeably good as "Put," cap- 
tain of the basketball team, and the small part of 
"Penny," undertaken by Jessie Norman, is a nice 
little characterization. , 

Lewis Stone makes a handsome and friendly chap 
out of the part of Billy Douglas, in love with Kate 
Wells; and Richard Vivian as "Brick" Harding, 
plays the young college ass in a manner undeniably 
funny. 



i If real music there is even less than a little in 
this production; but George Kunkel as Van Typel, 
"a clock maker", and Frank Bertrand as Baltazar, 
"a professional conspirator", do pretty fair justice 
to what possibilities of fun there are to be dis- 
covered in tile lines and situations of " I'.ahette". 
though a claim that this is a clever comic opera is 
haidly substantiated in the current production. 

Aiila Ilemini in the part of Babette sings prettily, 
and several of her songs — for instance, the dainty 
little "Be Kind to Poor Pierrot", fiiyl immediate 
favor with the audiences. 

Eugene Weiner does not scintillate in the tenor 
role of Marcel, "a painter in love with Babette". 
The tenor is the company's weakest point, musical- 
ly. Arthur Cunningham as Mondragon, "a soldier 
of fortune", usese his big voice to some advantage 
in the limited opportunities allowed him by this 
role. In the "funny business", Kunkel (a really 
droll and amusing fellow on the stage is Kunkel) 
is seconded by Maude Beatty .who impersonates 
Eva, the clock maker's wife. The costuming is 
very effective. 

A performance by the San Francisco Opera Com- 
pany with winsome little Daphne Pollard eliminat- 
ed is like a dish with its spiciest ingredient re- 
moved. She was the flavor of its earlier local pro- 
ductions. 



Crowded houses through the week sums up the 
public's verdict of "Are You a Mason?" at the Bur- 
bank. It is a jolly bit of a farce, "jolly well done," 
as any of our English friends would say — and some 
probably have said since Sunday ; for really, it is 
enough to make an Englishman laugh right out in 
meeting. 

When it comes to "criticism" of farce, there isn't 
much more than this that can be said. There are no 
subtleties to analyze ; no problems to soliloquize 
over, no "ifs" to juggle with. The thing is either 
good or bad, of its kind. This one is good. 

Henry Stockbridge in the part of a woman 
achieves the most prominent success of the play. In 
this role he is a laugh cannon of twelve inch caliber. 

John W. Burton, always a successful fun-maker, 
and Louise Royce make a strong team in this Ma- 
sonic affair, and Carroll Marshall, H. J. Ginn and B. 
Byron Beasely are highly successful in their respec- 
tive parts. 

It is doubtful if the Burbank folk will ever do 
anything funnier or more successful of its kind than 
"Are You a Mason?" L. B. 



Leaving musical considerations aside, the week's 
production of "Babette" at the Los Angeles Theater 
by the San Francisco Opera Company offers a 
good deal in the way of fun and frolic, passed over 
the footlights by performers who have become 
favorites with a large number of the patrons of this 
house of amusement. 



Theater Notes 

Dick Ferris will appear in the Auditorium cast 
again next week, the play being "Way Out West," 
which the Ferris organization never before has 
plaved in Los Angeles. It is stated that the play was 
written for his own use by himself and Ferdinand 
Grahame. In this production he appears in dual 
roles. Miss Stone will be seen in an ingenue role. 
"Cnder the Polar Star" is to follow "Way Out 
West." 

"Little Dorritt," a German dramatization of Dick- 
ens's works recast into English by Margaret Mayo, 
will have its first presentation in America at the Bel- 
asco next week. The play has been running for the 
past three vears in Berlin and Vienna. George \\ . 
Barnum will appear in the role of William Dorritt. 



28 



Pacific Outlook 



and Miss Emmet will be seen as Amy Dorritt. The 
combination should be a strong one. 

The Burbank offering for the coming week will 
be "Home Folks," a play by the author of "In Old 
Kentucky." 

"Fantana," with Teddy Webb in the principal 
part, will be produced at the Los Angeles next week 
by the San Francisco Opera Company. 

Mary — our own Mary — pulchritudinous Mary 
Van Buren — is really to be married at last. The 
report comes from across the waters and is pretty 
authentic, that the beautiful being who has left a 
trail of broken hearts across four continents, includ- 
ing Australia and Asia, has at last consented to be 
led to the altar. The winning man is a Mr. Paul of 
Calcutta, India, who has been a persistent wooer, 
ever since Miss Van Buren made her appearance 
in India on her tour with Frawley. 



Ferris Indoor Circus 

Dick Ferris has decided to supply Los Angeles 
with what he believes is" one of its "long felt wants." 
This is an "indoor circus," which opens under the 
Ferris management Saturday at Hill and Fourth 
streets. Of course, that charm of the dear old cir- 
cus, the billowy canvas, will be absent, but with a 
lavish use of bunting and streamers the roof will be 
make to look as delusively circusey as possible. 

In the big garage which has been secured for the 
circus purposes a regular sawdust ring has been con- 
structed and in addition to the ring features there 
will be a menagerie, among the inmates of which are 
to be named, it is said, four tiger kittens, "the only 
ones born in captivity" ; "Sunday," the smallest 
horse in the world, a sacred ox from the banks of 
the Ganges, and lions, snakes, monkeys and apes 
galore. Performing elephants are down on the pro- 
gramme. Regular daily circus parades are prom- 
ised. 



Fourth Symphony 

Friday afternoon, Feb. 7, the fourth concert of 
the season's Symphony series will take place at the 
Auditorium. The programme promises to be one of 
the best of the year, and will include the well known 
Saracen suite, Op. 30, by the late Edward Mac- 
Dowell — an appreciation to his memory as a com- 
poser. 

The soloist will be Arnold Kraus, violinist, who 
will render the Scotch Fantasie, Op. 46, by Max 
Bruch. 

Director Hamilton and his scymphony orchestra 
are a source of much pleasure and musical benefit 
to the people of Southern California, and the con- 
certs are coming into great favor with students and 
teachers. 

The full programme will be as follows : 

War March of the Priests, (Athalia) . Mendelssohn 
Saracen Suite, Op. 30. 

1. The .Saracens 

2. The Beautiful Alda . . . MadDowell 
Scotch Fantasie, Op. 46 Max Bruch 

Introduction; grave 
Allegro (dance) Andante Sestenuto 
Finale — Allegro Guerriero 
PART II 
Eighth Symphony in F Major, Op. 93 . Beethoven 
Allegro; Vivace e con brio 
Allegretto Scherzando 
Tempo di Menuetto 
Allegro vivace 



The Verne Farewell 

Adela Verne, the English pianist, has become a 
great favorite in this vicinity. Her farewell appear- 
ance has been planned for Thursday night, Feb. 6, 
when she will play at Simpson Auditorium. The 
programme will be as follows : 
The "Moonlight" Sonata .... .Beethoven 

Adagio Sostunuto 

Allegretto 

Presto Agitato 
Sonata, Op. 57, (Appassionata) . . . Beethoven 

Allegro assai 

Andante con moto 

Allegro ma non troppo 

PART II 

Nocturne Chopin 

Etude Chopin 

Polonaise Chopin 

PART III 

Prelude, Dedicated to Adela Verne . Fannie C. Dillon 

"A Withered Flower" . . . Francesco D'Auria 

(Composed for and dedicated to Adela Verne) 

Barcarolle Albert Elkus 

(Dedicated to Adela Verne) 
Liebestodt (Tristan and Isolde) . . Wagner-Liszt 
Military March Schubert-Tausig 

Eastern and Western Audiences. 

The many little clashes of opinion between eastern 
and western American communities are very amus- 
ing; and, as we are naturally a bit prejudiced in the 
matter, we cannot but believe that the West usually 
has the stronger argument. The following editorial 
comment on rudeness among theater-goers, taken 
from a paper supposed to voice the sentiments of a 
decidedly Western community — the Journal, of Al- 
buquerque — is illuminating: 

"Our Eastern friends are wont to refer to the West 
as the land of the "wild and woolly," but it looks 
very much as though an impartial jury would have 
to hold that in so doing they make a radical mistake 
in longitude. The real wild and woolly seems to 
make its home on Manhattan island — in proof of 
which take the following, which we copy from an 
editorial in the New York World : 

"The first performance of Miss Maude Adams' 
'The Testers' in the Empire theater was all but 
ruined by a theater party sideshow indulged in by a 
group of rude young people who occupied thirty-two 
seats in the middle of the house. They arrived late 
in the middle of an act. They had no interest in the 
play, but pre-empted the theater for social conven- 
ience. They laughed and chattered constantly. Their 
conduct was insolent, not only toward Miss Adams 
and her company, but toward their neighbors. Yet 
in their own homes they probably consider them- 
selves mannerly and considerate of others. Such 
scenes take place in Broadway theaters nearly every 
night.' 

"In England, it is said, persons who are so devoid 
of good breeding as to disturb an audience in the 
manner referred to above, are hissed, and if that does 
not have the desired effect a police officer is called. 
It is clear from the World's item, that English meth- 
ods ought to be adopted in New York, but there is 
no need of such measures "out west," because west- 
ern people know how to behave themselves." 

Stage Clothes. 

A writer in the Theater Magazine insists that very 
few American actresses have acquired the art of 
dressing a part properly, that is to say they do not 
understand the psychology of stage clothes. The 
writer, herself a woman, says : 

In real life, women of different types have certain 



Pacific Outlook 



29 



characteristic ways of dressing which, it properly 
understood, usually prove to be the keynotes of their 
respective personalities. An actress of artistic tem- 
perament ami intuition will tell you that to design 
gowns and wear them as would their counterparts in 
real life, is half the secret of character impersona- 
tion. Consequently, in choosing toilettes, an actress 

Should select those that will most forcibly accentuate 
the psychology of the character she is to enact, while 
at the same time they will emphasize the salient and 
distinctive personality of the woman she intends to 
portray. While lunching one day with Lizzie Hud- 
son Collier, she reminisccntlv confided to the writer 
that Madame Janauschek found it impossible to 
faithfully and artistically portray the character of 
Nancy Oldfield, unless she wore, as she always did in 



has tasted the bitterness of poverty, and upon whose 
mind her father's method of acquiring his wealth 
had preyed to the verge of morbidness. The gowns 
she wore were simple in make, even quiet in color, 
and the absence of elaborate trimming and intricate 
design, which would have suggested an expensive 
dressmaker, proclaimed at once to the audience a 
phase of the hidden psychology of the character 
which Miss i lre\ so subtly portrayed. 



Dickens's Notable Walks, 

Dickens was a horn walker, and the ability to 
walk is one of the choicest gifts that fortune be- 
stows, declares T. P.'s Weekly. To put one foot 
before the other, to shift oneself from place to place, 








Adela Verne whose farewell recital will be given February 6 



playing the part, coarse, unbleached muslin under- 
garments. This appreciation of the psychology of 
clothes, while it may seem so, is not extreme. If, as 
many women will "acknowledge, certain of their 
gowns will plunge them into appropriate moods, how 
true it must be that the correct toilet will put a tem- 
peramentally sensitive actress psychologically en 
rapport with the role she is interpreting. For in- 
stance, Katherine Grey in "Business Is Business" 
played the daughter of an extreme type of parvenu 
not in Redfern's latest walking gowns, not Worth's 
dernier cri in evening toilettes, but in the clothes of 
a sincere, unassuming type of a thoughtful girl, who 



is mere locomotion, it is not walking in the true, 
happy sense of the word. There are few walkers 
now, and day by day they grow fewer. There are 
two kinds of walking, and Boz has himself de- 
scribed them for us : "My walking is of two kinds : 
one, straight on end to a definite goal at a round 
pace: one, objectless, loitering, and finely vagabond. 
In the latter state, no gipsy on earth is a greater 
vagabond than myself; it is so natural to me. and 
strong with me. that I think I must be the descend- 
ant, at no great distance, of some irreclaimable 
tramp." 

We have, by chance, record of the origin of a 



30 



Pacific Outlook 



striking passage in "The Old Curiosity Shop" — 
the outcome of one of Dickens's innumerable night 
walks, "the fruit," says he, writing from Broad- 
stairs, "of a solitary walk by starlight on the cliff." 
And in the book we read : Little Nell is watching 
the stars, and then "she bent over the calm river, 
and saw .them shining- in the same majestic order 
as when the dove beheld them gleaming through 
the sullen waters, upon the mountain tops far 
down below, and dead mankind a thousand fathoms 
deep." "I really think," he says in the letter al- 
ready referred to, "the dead mankind of a thousand 
fathoms deep the best thing in the sentence. I have 
a notion of the dreadful silence down there, and of 
the stars shining through upon their dead eyes." 

It is not often that we gain so intimate a sight 
into the genesis of a thought. Is not the picture 
clear? Dickens, walking alone by starlight on the 
cliffs, whence you look out over waters which, 
when peaceful, seem innocent of any power to hurt ; 
over waters which lap the Goodwin Sands ; over 
waters beneath which moulder the carcases of many 
a stout ship and the worn bones of many a stout 
seaman. Walking there alone, under the stars, 
looking out over the calm waters which reflect 
them, thinking of Little Nell, who to him was as 
much alive as any of his children asleep at home, 
and whom he sees by his side, now looking up, and 
then down, there came to him that haunting image 
of the stars shining down through the waters upon 
. "dead mankind a thousand fathoms deep.". It is an 
error to think of Dickens as having immortalized 
himself solely by his wonderful treatment of Lon- 
don and its life. There are numbers of passages 
in his works which prove his thorough understand- 
ing and knowledge of the English country side. 
How can we learn to know the country except by 
walking through it? Walking- through it, not 
striding, not racing from the place we would leave 
to the place we would gain, but by vagabondizing 
about the byways and highways, in all seasons anrt 
in all weathers. It is the vagabond who knows na- 
ture's secrets. 

* * * 
The Fatal Alps 

Statistics officially compiled for 1907 supply us 
with the death-rate due to misadventure in the year 
now closing on the Alps — Italian, Swiss, and Aus- 
trian, and those of Dauphine, says the London 
Lancet. Actual loss of life is noted in 75 cases, the 
majority of the victims being divided between 
Swiss and German "peak-stormers" ; next in num- 
ber are those from the British Isles ; and then 
come the Italians. Among the causes of this fatal- 
ity, that which overtops all others is the foolhardi- 
ness (every year more prevalent) of essaying the 
more difficult ascents without a guide ; in many 
of most frequent "misadventure" are those of Cen- 
tral Switzerland — the Bernese Oberland particular- 
ly; next come the Graian Alps, the highest peak of 
Alps which figure first in the black list as the scene 
cases, moreover, without even a companion. The 
which is the Gran Paradiso, and the Pennine range, 
culminating in Mont Blanc and Monte Rosa. 
Among the "'incidents of fatality" fourteen are 
classed under the head of "flower-gathering in dan- 
gerous localities," the edelweiss tempting the ma- 
jority of victims. Of those thus lured to their de- 
struction there were two ladies of- mature years,' 
two young ladies, and three young men. Accidents 



not terminating fatally but more or less grave were 
three hundred and fifty — some not figuring in that 
number- from not having been reported or regis- 
tered. 

* * » 
Change of Robbers 

"So you enjoyed Venice?" said the traveler. 
"Yes," answered Mr. Cum.rox. "It was kind of 
pleasant, for a change, to be robbed by a gondolier 
instead of a hack driver." — Washington Star. 

* # * 

Book Agent — Good morning! Are you the lady of 
the house? Bridget — I'm wan o' thim. — Life. 



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Position Business . 



>• .Angeles, California 




MS 



February 8. 1908 



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The Truth About Roosevelt 

PROGRESS OF "THE GAME" 

IN LOCAL POLITICS 

DIVING UNDER A CHURCH 

Fearless Editorial Comment — Candid Musical, Dramatic and Art 
Criticism — Chat from Society and Women's 
Clubs — Literary Notes 



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Gworgr Baker Jtndersnn 
COITOR AND GINCRtL MANAGER 



Jt Southwestern Weekly 

Lanier Bartleit 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR 



Howard Ctark Galtoupm 

MANAGER OF ADVERTISING 



Published every Saturday at 3rS>3lQ>320 Lissner BuUd'.ng. 
Los Jtngetes, California, by the 

Pacific Outlook Company. 

Subscription price S2.00 a year in advance. Single copy 10 
cents on all neuts stands. 

Entered 11 »econd-clais matter April 5, 1907, at the postofticc at Los Angeles, 
California, under ihe act of Congress of March J, 1879. 

The Editor of the Pacific Oitlook cannot guarantee to return manuscripts, 
» Hough he will endeavor to do so if stamps for that purpose are inclosed with tbem 
If your manuscript is valuable, keep a copy of it. 

Vol. 4. Los Jingeles, CaL, February S, 190S Mo. 6 

NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS 

The Pacific Outlook is mailed to subscribers through 
the Los Angeles Post Office every Friday, and should be 
delivered in every part of the city by Saturday's post. If 
for any reason it should be delayed, or be delivered in 
poor condition, subscribers will confer a favor upon the 
publishers by giving them immediate notice. The date on 
the wrapper shows the time to which your subscription is 
paid as shown by our ledgers. No receipts will be mailed 
unless specially requested. Telephone Home F 7966. 

COMMENT 

MAYOR HARPER will not reappoint James A. 
Anderson to the Board of Public Works. He will 
name Chief of Police Edward Kern as successor to 
Mr. Anderson. This, at least, is the present pro- 
gramme. On the last Monday in January, during the 
days when the subject of Mr. Anderson's reappoint- 
ment was being agitated in practically all of the 
newspapers of Los Angeles, which was the day on 
which the Examiner published an interview with 
Mayor Harper in which the latter was reported as 
declaring emphatically that under no circumstances 
would he reappoint Mr. Anderson, the mayor 
issued a statement to the effect that 
Machine's he would name Mr. Anderson. pro- 
Plot vided the latter would accept a reap- 
pointment. From what has transpired 
since that time it is evident that in making this 
statement Mayor Harper did not act in that good 
faith which should characterize the course of the 
chief executive of a large city. The initiated un- 
derstand that the mayor has been hoping that there 
might arise some situation that could be employed 
as a pretext for superseding Mr. Anderson. That 
situation has now arisen, and upon other shoulders 
the mayor will be able to place the responsibility, 
or a good share of it, for his failure to respond to 
the demands of the people that he abandon his 
project of converting the Board of Public Works 
into a part of the political machine which he is 
striving to build up. 

* * * 

THE SCHEME of the mayor and the Demo- 
cratic machine leaders is a brilliant one. It is — 
really brilliant. Whether it will be put through or 
not depends entirely upon the citizens of Los 
Angeles. The "frame-up" is as follows: The Dem- 
ocratic central committee will meet at an early 
date and pass a resolution declaring that inasmuch 



as the law requires that one of the members ol 
the Board of Public Works shall be a Democrat 

and that as Mr. Anderson is not a gomd Democrat 
he is not eligible, the mayor shall name Edward 
Kern, a Democrat of Democrats, as Mr. 
In Anderson's successor. The plan is that 
Debt no unseemly haste shall be shown, but 
that things shall be allowed, apparently, 
to take their natural course. By adopting this 
course the mayor hopes to avoid the invocation 
of the, recall and to pay a political debt which has 
been annoying him ever since he assumed office. 
"Uncle" George Smith, at one time a candidate 
for the nomination for the mayoralty, is said to 
have exacted of Mr. Harper a promise that, in 
the event of the election of the latter, he would 
put Mr. Kern on the Board of Public Works. The 
present "frame-up" indicates that Mr. Harper gave 
his word ; and now, according to the talk among 
Democratic politicians and others, he is striving 
to find some way in which he may "make good." 
*** 

THERE IS MORE to the scheme. There is 
much talk of pressure brought to bear upon the 
mayor from one of his chief advisers, the man- 
agement of the Times, to the end that Captain 
Broadhead shall be made chief of police. Of 
course there cannot be two heads to the police 
department; so if Broadhead is to have the job 
Kern must be looked after. The Times is said 
to have a pretty stiff story regarding the mayor 
which it is prepared to tell if Harper does not 
"come through" with these appointments. The 
city government as at present constituted is run 

by Captain Broadhead, Captain 

Royal Arch Flammer, Captain Auble, Sam- 

And The Times uel Schenck, the mayor's chief 

adviser, and the Los Angejes 
Times. There are' certain non-essentials in which 
these men do not interfere, it is true ; but when it 
comes down to such important undertakings as 
the administration of great public enterprises the 
advice of these men is now generall}- understood 
to "go." Not only the Times, but the Royal Arch, 
also, in which Frank Goings, a saloonist, etc., etc., 
is a chief spirit, demands that Kern, one of its 
pets, shall be treated with due consideration and 
that Broadhead shall not be overlooked. City 
Prosecutor Fleming is said to be in possession of 
the details concerning the project of the Royal 
Arch, but how much he will do or how much he 
can do is a question. 

*** 

WHAT WE HAVE SAID on this matter has 
become the talk of the streets. That there is more 
truth than poetry in it all has been made evident 
by the tactics the mayor is pursuing in his fight 
to get Mr. Anderson off the Board of Public Works. 
The Pacific Outlook was aware of the fact that 
the mayor proposed a reorganization of the board 
as long ago as the second week of the < (wens river 



Pacific Outlook 



aqueduct campaign. From time to time it directed 
attention to the danger which confronted the 
city, but none of the daily papers took the 
matter up until the mayor's intentions became so 
notorious that nearly everybody in town was talk- 
ing about the matter. When the mayor was inter- 
viewed by a delegation of well- 
Does Not Fear known men a day or two after 
the Recall? the editor of this paper had in- 
dicated that His Honor had some- 
thing of this sort "up his sleeve," he denied in 
emphatic terms that he had any thought of re- 
moving or asking for the resignation of either Mr. 
Edwards or Mr. Hubbard. But it appears that he 
had said nothing regarding his plans looking 
toward superseding Mr. Anderson. Possibly at 
that time the thought of getting rid of Mr. Ander- 
son upon the expiration of his term had not entered 
his mind. The great hue and cry which he realized 
would follow the appointment of other men to 
succeed either Mr. Edwards or Mr. Hubbard may 
have influenced him to abandon this project and 
to turn his attention to the other member of the 
board. . However that may be, the mayor prob- 
ably will now bend every energy, reinforced by the 
embryo machine, to get rid of Mr. Anderson, re- 
gardless of all threats to invoke the recall. 

* ¥ ¥ 

THERE IS MUCH MORE that might be said 
to indicate that the city faces a grave danger. There 
are stories afloat that fairly sicken one. But 
leaving all other things out of consideration, the 
fact that Mr. Anderson's term expired more than 
five weeks ago, that Mayor Harper promised to 
appoint him if he would accept the office again, 
and that he has not yet seen fit to keep his word, 
are enough to convince a man of reasonable per- 
spicuity that something is wrong. It is not what 
the mayor says or what he promises to do that 
counts. It is what he actually does. If he would 
preserve his fair name there is but one thing left 

for him to do, and that is to reap- 
Suppose He point Mr. Anderson without ar.other 
Goes Ahead day's delay. Every day that he 

defers action in this direction serves 
to pile up the popular feeling of resentment at his 
course and to strengthen the fear that he and 
his machine advisers still entertain sinister de- 
signs regarding the administration of the affairs 
of the Board of Public Works. Perhaps, after all, 
it will be as well for the city, in the end, if the 
mayor be permitted to go ahead with his scheme 
and oust Mr. Anderson, naming Chief Kern in his 
place. This act would be followed by such a tre- 
mendous outpouring of popular wrath that the 
recall of our chief executive and the salvation of 
the public works department would be inevitable. 
Let the mayor proceed with his gigantic folly, then ! 
It is high time that the whole rotten political mess 
were aired, anyway. 

* * * 

IN THIS CONNECTION it is worthy of note 
that the Herald, the only Democratic paper in the 
city, after having refrained for many weeks from 
uttering a single word condemnatory of the policy 
of the mayor in this matter, has at last come out 
vigorously in a demand that the mayor shall cease 
to play petty politics and reappoint Mr. Anderson 



at once. The Herald, after editorially reviewing 
the situation, says : "The appointment of Mr. An- 
derson is indicated by the public 
Democratic necessities of the case while the ap- 
Advice pointment of Mr. Kern or anyone else 

on a seemingly arbitrary but its real- 
ity skillfully arranged for demand of the Democratic 
central committee, will, in the long run, have such 
a demoralizing effect on the mayor's political health 
that for purely selfish and hygienic reasons, 
if those that are nobler and more patriotic do not 
convince him, Mayor Harper should appoint Mr, 
Anderson without delay." If our Democratic poli- 
tician-mayor does not see fit to listen to the voice 
of the people, will he prudently listen to the voice 
of the only Democratic daily in the city? Will he? 

* * * 

THE BOLD ATTITUDE of the Herald, which 
at last has suggested the mayor's recall in the 
event that he obstinately refuse to cease playing 
petty politics (the suggestion coming in the shape 
of its cartoon of Wednesday morning), ought to 
influence the mayor. We quote still further 
"In endeavoring to find an explanation of the 
mayor's display of the characteristic that horse- 
men call, balkiness the puzzled optimist, who seeks 
to put the best possible construction on motives 
and action, is reluctantly compelled to accept the 
conclusion that his honor is temporizing, or, as 
they say down south, 'trifling.' Why should he 
be marking time instead of marching forward in 
the road called 'Right'? In the effort to find an 
explanation that is consistent with reason and 
that does not -impugn the mayor's common sense, 
it is suggested that he is waiting 

The Two until the Democratic central corn- 
Ends Sought mittee meets. The onus of execut- 
ing a secretly cherished programme 
will then be thrown upon that body. The law re- 
quires that a Democrat shall be appointed. The 
committee will call upon the mayor to appoint some 
one, and possibly may recommend Ed. Kern! 
To bold the appointment — and the public — in stis- . 
pense until the committee meets will give the ap- 
pearance of a skillful and deliberate 'avoidance of 
'unseemly haste,' while the methodical manner in 
which the programme will be carried out may pro- 
tect the mayor from the aspersion that he has 
allowed his zeal to outrun his discretion, though 
every present indication would warrant a belief 
that he is allowing his private political discretion 
to deter his public zeal. By adhering to the policy 
of making haste at a snail's pace the mayor hopes 
to achieve two noble, altruistic, heroic ends, the 
mere statement of which should inspire the public 
recorder to write the name of Harper in the Hall 
of Fame." 

* * * 

THE RECALL provision of the existing charter 
will be incorporated in the new charter. Of that 
there is no doubt. So emphatically have the people 
once declared in its favor that, regardless of 
what may happen to other "socialistic," "un- 
American", "long-hair" devices, the recall surely 
will stay. Good. The recall is, beyond all ques- 
tion, the most effective popular weapon of defense 
against crooked and incompetent elective officials 
yet devised. While years may pass without find- 
ing it necessary or wise to invoke it, it is well 
to have it near at hand. Like the old-time school- 



Pacific Outlook 



master's switch which stood conveniently near his 
desk, the moral effect of its presence 
The Recall must be great. When public officials 
Will Stay know that there is a certain point be- 
yond which they cannot go and hope 
bo escape the recall, government will l>c adminis- 
tered more nearly in accord with the voice pi the 

people. With the initiative, the referendum and 
the recall as fundamentals in our City Charter, and 
a still further enlightened citizenship, the ad- 
ministration of municipal affairs in this city bids 
fair to reach as high a plane as that thus far 
attained by any city in the country. But without 
the recall, above all principles, we surely shall 
retrograde — descend once more to the level of 
th se cities which are misgoverned almost to their 
death by the small politicians — of whom we have 
a few exceedingly conspicuous examples in our 
own Los Angeles. 

* * * 

THE BETHLEHEM Institutions and the de- 
cent people of Los Angeles do not stand "deuce 
high" with that noble body of men, the police com- 
mission of Los Angeles. The other day a man 
who has been for some time in the employ of a 
large brewery in this city applied to the commis- 
sion for a license to conduct a saloon within a short 
distance of the soul- and body-saving institution 
managed by Dana Bartlett. Mr. Bartlett and sev- 
eral others protested, showing that the location of 
a saloon at the point in question would work 
havoc among those for whom his insti- 
"Booze" tution was endeavoring to accomplish 
Is King! something. The commission undoubt- 
edly realized that in granting the license 
it was setting at work a force aimed at the 
destruction of the very foundations of the 
undertaking established by Mr. Bartlett. But 
difl it hesitate? Xo — it did not even think of hesi- 
tating. Mayor Harper — may this be put to his 
everlasting credit — voted against the granting of 
the license. Commissioners Fuller, Woodhill and 
Lewis voted for it. If the mayor would pay a 
little more attention to his police commission, 
wdiich needs attention, and a little less to the Board 
of Public Works, which does not need his atten- 
tion, he would be doing a distinct service for the 
city. — "Booze" is -King! All hail "Booze!" 

* * * 

AX INSTANCE of petty graft of a kind that 
usually fails to attract public attention because it 
has become so common has been brought to light 
by that splendid citizen an'', conscientious public 
official, Supervisor George Alexander. The tri- 
umvirate known as "the solid three" in the Board 
of Supervisors charged the county with mileage for 
a trip made, at no expense to these men, in 
the automobile provided by the county for the 
use of the highway commission — that was all. In 
other words, these three men demanded that the 
county should pay certain traveling ex- 
Petty penses twice. Contemptible as the demand 
Graft was, its payment was insisted upon, even 
after Supervisor Alexander had denounced 
it. This is a specimen of graft which has been 
tolerated for so long that it is presumable that 
the members of the Board of Supervisors, like the 
members of the state legislature who ride to and 
from the capital on passes and collect their mileage 
also, lo k upon it as a vested right. Probably none 



of them would think of making any such claim 

in private business. Whatever the law may or ma) 

i i say on the subject, viewed from any Other 

point the collection of these mileage accounts 

would not lie pressed by honest nun. But the 

district attorney •ays the demands are illegal li 
will be interesting to note whether the graft goes 
through after it has been laid bare. 
* * * 

HOW LONG, ob, how long, ye literary gods. 
manaclers of wisdom and secreters of knowledge, 
how long, we cry, must the dainty, tapefed fingers 
of our friends and the thick, vilely expressive 
thumbs of our enemies search, pinch themselves 
and twist in the narrow and dusty slots, the crev- 
asses of gloom, at the public library, seeking vainly 
the current magazine which is not there except 
perhaps before dawn. This venerable storehouse 
of ephemeral wit and cheerful but nevertheless 
at least ebdomadally sought misstatement is un- 
doubtedly an heirloom. It has the 
A Reader's marks of thoughtless carpentry, of 

Plaint illiterate complacency in a thing badly 

done. Praise the sweet public for its 
acquiescence in the stable decrees of the gods ! 
May this publication, if it ever lie within the 
dim and musty confines of that husk of inconven- 
ience, the magazine rack at the public library, 
carry with it a disrupting germ to destroy the fond 
traditions which guard this inadequate structure! 
If there be a niggardly fancy among the powers that 
govern, that library readers enjoy discomfort, dis- 
gust and dirt, let them dispel that playful fancy and 
generously supply us with a decent means to store 
and to display magazines we wish to read. 
* # * 

REYNOLD E. BLIGHT, in "Fellowship," 
speaks with great frankness concerning a certain 
brand of cowards not unknown to Los Angeles and 
the influences which makes them cowards. He 
says: "The fear of being dubbed a crank, an ass, 
or an anarchist has shut the mouth and tied the 
hands of more good people than all the fires of mar- 
tyrdom. If you can't answer your opponent, 
brand him with some opprobrious epithet, and ig- 
nominy will do what your eloquence and argument 
have failed to do. Many a politician with his face 
to the light has crawfished before the challenge, 

'you are a Socialist." Many a 

Damned with promising young prophet has sung 

an Epithet small in fear of the taunt, 'heretic' 

Many a writer wdiose desk was 
rosy with dreams of a noble social order has been 
driven into commonplace drivel under the whip, 
'anarchist'. Once in a while a stout-hearted hero 
of the new time braves the epithet, and flings back 
argument and facts into the teeth of his foes, 1111- 
terrified and- unashamed. Often he goes to prison, 
sometimes to the gibbet, always beyond society's 
artificial pale ; but thev wdio in derision are 'first 
called Christians at Antioch' overthrow the Roman 
Empire, 'Methodist' becomes the synonym of mir- 
acle-working spiritual power, and 'Abolitionist' be- 
comesrthe badge of the apostles of freedom. Only 
the coward fears the epithet." 
* * * 
AXD THE automobile shall devour the camel! 
William C. Magelssen, American consul in Asiatic 
Turkey, in an official report makes the following 
observations, which should be of particular interest 



Pacific Outlook 



to automobilists : "The matter of establishing an 
automobile service was discussed by me with the 
Governor-General and the suggestion made that 
inasmuch as the local government is expending 

money for building a road in certain 

By Auto rough places between the cities of 

to Bagdad Bagdad and Aleppo that it might be 

worth while while looking into the 
feasibility of such a service. The Governor-Gen- 
eral was enthusiastic, and stated that he had con- 
sidered the advisability of introducing motor cars. 
If American builders of automobiles will send cata- 
logues and full description of their freight and pas- 
senger machines, with price lists, I may be 
able to induce the managers of the stage service to 
make a trial with American automobiles. There is 
no electricity obtainable here and the motive 
power must be petroleum or gasoline. Exporters 
should quote prices c. i. f. Beirut and Bassora." 
9 * * 

"IF PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT frames one 
or two more such addresses he will be elected Pres- 
ident in spite of himself,'' declared President Lee 
C. Gates of the City Club at its meeting last Sat- 
urday. The tremendous applause evoked by the 
expression of this opinion was but an echo of pop- 
ular sentiment 'from one end of the land to the 
other. The tone of the press of America is har- 
monious. With the exception of the Republican 
papers upon whose editorial pages is stamped the 
propaganda of Standard Oil, Harriman, Morgan 
and the other big interests which seek the downfall 
of the President and his policies, practically all are 
a unit in announcing that the next 
In Spite of President of the United States will be 

Himself either Roosevelt or Taft. Since the pub- 
lication of the greatest message ever 
sent to the Congress — the most bold and insistent 
appeal that the Congress and the administration 
shall be permitted "to finish the work we are in" 
made by any executive — the American people ap- 
pear to have arisen almost as one man to demand 
of Roosevelt that he reconsider his determination 
not to accept a renomination. On the theory that 
a bad promise is better broken than kept, they 
have begun to argue that it is the sacred duty of 
Roosevelt to remain at the head of the nation until 
the task to which he has set his hand is finished — ■ 
not that popular confidence in Taft is lacking, but 
that even Taft, schooled as he is in the Roosevelt 
doctrine, may not pursue wickedness with the 
same vigor and unrelenting determination that 
has characterized President Roosevelt's adminis- 
tration. 

* * * 

THE PACIFIC OUTLOOK does not take this 
view. While we would prefer to see Roosevelt per- 
sonally continue to conduct the campaign for 
the restoration to the people of the rights and 
privileges guaranteed to them by the organic law 
of the land, but of which they have been deprived, 
in large measure, as the result of the depredations 
of rich malefactors, we have the utmost faith in 
Secretary Taft. Perhaps not so quickly and with 
less offense to the offenders would the latter pros- 
ecute to the end the magnificent work 
All Doubts undertaken by our greatest of Presi- 
Dissipated dents, but we believe that he, more 
than any other man, except Roose- 
velt, yet mentioned for the office, would continue 



to wage war against the organizations of preda- 
tory wealth, to seek to destroy the iniquities which 
threaten to undermine the government, to rebuild 
the political structure, insuring fair play and a 
square deal for all. If Roosevelt cannot be brought 
to give his consent to accept a renomination if it 
should be tendered him practically unanimously, 
the selection of Taft appears inevitable. If there 
were any doubts in the matter a fortnight since, 
they have been dissipated by the remarkable mes- 
sage of the President — the greatest in history, ac- 
cording to the popular view. 

* * * 

IT WAS hardly necessary for the President to 
reiterate his policy toward capital. But so vigor- 
ously has predatory wealth assailed the adminis- 
tration for the efforts put forth to secure an en- 
forcement of the laws governing great combina- 
tions of capital, so great has been the conspiracy 
to discredit the motives of the executive, so vin- 
dictive and so untruthful have been the statements 
issued by the Rockefellers and the Harrimans and 
their paid attorneys in contradiction of the charges 
made by the President, that it 

Not After were well for all advocates of the 
the "Puppets" executive policy continually to 
emphasize a few of the most im- 
portant pronouncements found in this message. 
The administration has not attacked wealth. "We 
attack only the corrupt men of wealth, who find 
in the purchased politicians the most efficient in- 
strument of corruption and in the purchased news- 
paper the most efficient defender of corruption," 
declares the President. "Our main quarrel is not 
with the agents and representatives of the 'inter- 
ests.' They derive their chief power from the great 
sinister offenders who stand behind them. They 
are but puppets who move as the strings are pulled. 
It is not the puppets, but the strong cunning men 
and the mighty forces working for evil behind 
'and through the puppets with whom we have to 
deal." 

* * * 

LET US analyze this brief statement of policy. 
Let us localize it. Let us see who and what there 
may be in California coming under the presidential 
ban. The President says he attacks none but the 
"corrupt men of wealth." What corrupt man or 
men of wealth liable to attack under federal laws 
are directly responsible for the oppression of the 
people of California? Is Edward H. Harriman, 
boss of the great Union Pacific system, which, as 
owner of the Southern Pacific, has politically sub- 
jugated California, one of them? Is 
Who Are John D. Rockefeller, Archbold or Rog- 
the Men?, ers, controlling the Standard Oil mon- 
ster, which, as a partner of the rail- 
roads in crime, has attempted to destroy the inde- 
pendent oil industry in this state, one of them? 
And to whom or to what does the President refer, 
so far as California is most directly interested, 
when he speaks of the "purchased politician" and 
the "purchased newspaper?" Is George C. Per- 
kins, the senatorial champion of Southern Pacific 
politics, one of them? Is Frank P. Flint, now and 
then attorney for the Southern Pacific and the op- 
ponent of full investigation into the matter of that 
railroad's interest in a Panama railroad, one of 
them? Is the Los Angeles Times, the father of 
the anti-Roosevelt fake "Taft clubs" and the friend 
of the San Francisco grafters, one of them ? 



Pacific Outlook 



\\ Hi ' IS 111KKK who will dare openly to qnes- 
t ho motives of the President in his dealings 

with the rich criminal ami the laborer after reading 

this: "We act in no vindictive spirit, and we 

dm respecters of persons. If a labor union does 

wrong, \\ i- oppose it as firmly as we oppose a c r 
poration which does wrong; and we stand equally 
stoutly for the rights of the man of wealth and for 
the rights of the wage worker. We seek to protect 
the property of every man who acts honestly, of 
every corporation that represents wealth honestly 

accumulated and honestly used. We 

Confession seek to stop wrong-doing, and we de- 

of Guilt sire to punish the wrong-doers only so 

far as is necessary to achieve this 
end." What is there in this that should impel any 
rich man to raise the cry of rage? Nothing — unless 
such rich man he dishonest. The attacks upon the 
President coming from this class are prima facie 
evidences of guilt. Every cry of anger, every "ap- 
peal to the people," is a confession of guilt. The 
rich thieves have been detected, and in their des- 
peration they would divert public attention by rais- 
ing a counter cry. But it won't work. The pur- 
chased press and the purchased politicians fool 
nobody — not even themselves. Well may they be 
alarmed for the safety of their clients, the giant 
rascals of high finance and public exploiters. For 
SO sure as there was a God in Israel will the latter 
be punished for their crimes. 

* * * 

WE HAVE referred to United States Senator 
Flint as one of the men possibly coming under ex- 
ecutive ban. Whether Senator Flint was one of 
the men Air. Roosevelt had in mind when he 
penned the paragraph to which reference has been 
made we do not know ; nor does it matter. But 
we do know that Mr. Flint was the choice of the 
Southern Pacific politicians for United States sen- 
ate and that he was elected to the office he 
now fills because the Republican members of the 
legislature — most of them — obeyed the orders 
given to them. We know, also, that in at least 
one crisis in the affairs of the Southern Pacific 
and allied transportation concerns Senator Flint 
used his influence to keep the senate and the nation 

from learning from the lips of 
Whom Does Flint J. L. Bristow, who made a de- 
Represent? tailed investigation into the 

matter, about the conditions in 
the Pacific mail traffic on this coast in connection 
with the question of the Panama railroad. Con- 
fronted with an opportunity to take up an investi- 
gation into the methods employed by the railroad 
he serves to monopolize the traffic on the west 
coast of the United States, Senator Flint vigorously 
opposed the appearance of Mr. Bristow before the 
senate committee on inter-oceanic canals. Mr. 
Bristow knows much about the influence of the 
railroad over transportation across the isthmus, and 
from the Southern Pacific and Flint viewpoint 
he is a thing to be feared and abhorred. Those 
who have expected the Southern California senator 
to serve both the people and the Southern Pacific 
are disappointed. How many oT this class of citi- 
zens will help to make another Flint possible by 
voting for the machine candidates for the state leg- 
islature at the next election? 

* * * 
CONGRESSMAN HAYES is rapidly becoming 

persona non grata with the Southern Pacific outfit. 



Though elected t I ongress a- tlu- candidate of 
the llenin machine, it is now understood among 
the initiated that his failure to obey implicitly all 

orders transmitted to him hv the fountain head 

of authority has resulted in the transfer of his name 
to the blacklist kept in the secret recesses of 
the heart of the Democratic lash-wielder in San 
Francisco. If this is true, it probably means that 
Mr. I laves has discovered in 
Hayes's Change himself a man lacking in that 
of Heart degree of turpitude which is an 

essential qualification to polit- 
ical success, as success is measured by the standard 
of the Southern Pacific bosses. One thing is 
certain: Mr. Hayes has kept himself well-informed 
on the progress of the Lincoln-Roosevelt League 
movement and he fully realizes that Southern 
Pacific domination in California is already prac- 
tically at an end. As he never has been quite as 
willing to "take orders" — and obey them — as the 
other members of the Southern Pacific delegation 
have been, a declaration of comlpete independence 
on his part may be expected at any time. He is 
too good a man to bow forever to the will of such 
forces as the railroad masters have been. He can- 
not remain "loyal" much longer, we believe. 

* * * 

THE REPUBLICAN readers of the Los An- 
geles Times doubtless have been thrown into a 
hilarious mood by the vigorous anti-Roosevelt pro- 
nouncements found in the editorial columns of the 
paper since the publication of the late message of 
President Roosevelt. It is evident that the Times 
has been hard hit by what the President has had 
to say regarding its friends, certain "purchased pol- 
iticians," and more especially by his more per- 
sonal reference to "purchased newspapers." In its 
rage the Times has taken a step from which it can- 
not recede without acting the journalistic poltroo - 
— though this would not be a difficult thing for it 
to do. It has come out against Roosevelt, and nec- 
essarily against what are known as 
The Mask the Roosevelt policies, in terms that 
Has Fallen cannot be misunderstood. Its hatred 
of the President, long held in leash, 
has escaped ; in phrases that Times readers may 
easily interpret it Iieaps maledictions upon the 
chief executive. Nurtured by the infamy of Her- 
rinism, made fat by feeding upon Calhoun and Har- 
riman, its senile eyes blinded by rage at the 
thought that the President may have had it in 
mind, along with others of its stripe, when he wrote 
the fateful words "purchased newspapers," in 
Times has snapped at the bait and swallowed 
hook and sinker. It is a Republican paper no more, 
excepting that it will continue to stand by 
the criminals enriched through the wantonness of 
the plutocratic wing of the party. It is standing 
bv its colors loyally. Its fangs are easily identi- 
fied. They are those of the jackal interrupted at 
his feast. How hideous in the eyes of decent, patri- 
otic men ! 

* * * 

"Did you have a good time at your musical?" 
"No," answered Mr. Cumrox. "every time the 
band played anything I enjoyed I got worried for 
fear it wasn't classical enough to be the money's 
worth." — Washington Star. 



8 



Pacific Outlook 



CHile Con Came 

As, civilized couples advance in the art of getting 
rid of each other legally, the Indian is just working 
up to the point of invoking the old-fashioned pale 
face law to enforce marriage promises. A Nez 
Perce maiden, aged twenty-three, up in Idaho, has 
just filed a $3,000 damage suit against a buck of the 
same tribe who had been snooping around her wig- 
wam with the apparent — and. indeed, she claims 
actually expressed — purpose of matrimony. Now 
she alleges breach of promise. The Nez Perces are 
progressing in civilization. 

A Kansas newspaper complains because when its 
editor went to church the congregation sang "Shall 
We Know Each Other There?" when, upon look- 
ing around, he discovered that half the congrega- 
tion was not on speaking terms with the other half. 
To suit such a church this hymn should be sung 
"Must We Know Each Other There?" 

Mrs. B. Fay Mills declares that every man is a 
minister. If this is true, the mayor and the chief 
of police should do some missionary work among 
the saloonists who violate the Sunday closing ordi- 
nance and the brothel keepers and brothel own- 
ers who laugh at the efforts of those other ministers 
who have been ordained. 

Senator Perkins says that he is camping upon the 
trail of the recalcitrant, stubborn and unyielding 
Wiley. Somebody else, we recently have become 
convinced, is camping upon the trail of the once 
recalcitrant, stubborn and unyielding Perkins. 

Isn't it about time to abolish the railroad death 
traps in Los Angeles? The cost of a viaduct at the 
point where the recent Brooklyn avenue car tragedy- 
occurred would not be prohibitive. 

A daily newspaper of Santa Fe, New Mexico, is 
known in some quarters of that territory as the 
"Almanac." In Los Angeles we have one which 
deserves the sobriquet of "Almaniac." 

Let us watch out lest some big portion of that 
twenty-three millions should skidoo mysteriously 
after the proposed Democratic reorganization of 
the Board of Public Works. 

A little learning is a dangerous thing. For ex- 
ample, take the cases of the grafters who have re- 
fused to profit by all they might have learned about 
Rudolph Spreckels. 

So the Arcadia racetrack sheol furnishes passes 

to the Los Angeles police commissioners ! And 

Arcadia still circulates its printed touts on the 
streets of the city. 

A wise husband may be he who brags about his 
wife's cooking, but a wise wife is she who brags 
about how her husband controls his appetite for 
cigars. 

Petrarch says that "books were only invented to 
aid the memory." It is a pity that he could not 
come back and tell us why some newspapers exist. 

After shouting for Foraker for twenty years, an 
Ohio club has announced itself for Taft. It's get- 
ting to be horribly infectious, this Taftitis. 

Monday would have been a good day for the or- 
ganization of the Oregon Society of Southern Cali- 
fornia. It was a typical "webfoot" day. 

Chancellor Day of Syracuse University admits 
that he is one of the "hired" book writers referred 



to by the President in his message. He ought also 
to be a "fired" chancellor. No patriotic American 
out to send a son to sit under the teachings of 
Chancellor Day. 

If the electric road csin transport passengers to 
Arcadia at tweny-five cents -per round trip at a 
profit, what is a fair rate to the beaches? 

The most effectual "knocking" you can give your 
town is to be afraid to have alleged abuses investi- 
gated. — Albuquerque Journal. 

Now that the Times has abandoned the Repub- 
lican party to its fate what is Los Angeles to do for 
a morning Republican paper? 

Mayor Taylor has removed a San Francisco fire 
commissioner for "doing politics." Nothing like 
that in our municipal family. 

Calhoun's eagerness to be tried before Ruef is 
proves how thoroughly he believes that his inno- 
cence may be established. 

President Ripley says he didn't, but that letter 
Henry forwarded to the President is rather embar- 
rassing, to say the least. 

California should be very proud of one of its 
possessions. Its State Legislature is the very best 
that money can buy. 

The Express is wrong. The Near-Taft clubs are 
not "come-ons." They are "get-outs." 

Coldwater, Mich., should change its name. It 
has refused to vote "dry." 

She worries most who is not the object of worry 
on the part of some man. 

How would Taft and Bryan sound for a cam- 
paign slogan? 

Bryan says that silver is an issue no longer. 
Neither is Bryan. 

¥ * * 

WHAT NOTED PEOPLE: SAY 



Eminent Jurist on "Yellow Peril" 
Justice Harlan, TJ. S. Supreme Court 
If I had the opportunity I would vote for an 
appropriation of $50,000,000 a year for a period of 
ten years for a larger navy. The great importance 
of a navy is shown in the Constitution, which re- 
stricts the appropriations for the army, but sets ho 
limit for those for the navy. There is no such 
thing as friendship between nations as between 
men. Nations make no sacrifice to preserve friend- 
ships and do not forbear to do certain things be- 
cause they do not meet with the approval of 
another nation. The trend of the immigration of 
the white people in the past has been from the East 
to the West. There has been none from the West. 
Just across the water there is a country with an 
immense population whose commerce we are seek- 
ing. There are 400,000,000 Chinese, as strong 
physically and mentally as we are. There is over 
there another nation whose people are progressive 
and ambitious. We may some day see a skilled 
army in Japan of from 5.000,000 to 10.000,000. 
They will say : "You claim Europe as your country. 
This is ours. Get out !" I don't think they have 
any such idea now, and we have no hostility toward 
them. But there will be a conflict between the 






Pacific Outlook 



tul the « ' * li nt will shake the 

earth. \\ hen it c mes 1 want to see this countrj 
with a navy "ii both oceans that will be strong 
igh. 



Trade Schools a Necessity 

N v. Education commissioner 
We have come to the point where it is manifest 
enough th;it if millions of American 1> ys and girls 
arc to have their fair chance we must establish new 
public policies to give it to them; if auything like 
sirable number are to become good workmen, 
the schools must train them for it; it we an 
be just t i the rich and poor alike, if we are to lei 
public policies give equal support to all of the com- 
mon interests, and if we arc to have the conditions 
which are precedent to the mural and intel- 
lectual worth of men and women, we must estab- 
lish in the educational system a just balance 
between the interest?- of th se who are to work 
with their heads and those who are to work with 
their hands throughout the country. 



Broaden Use of School-Room 
Prof. Zorblin, University of Chicago 
When we sneak of schoolhouses we do not neces- 
sarily mean that the}' are places merely to pursue 
studies. We can bring into them features like 
concerts and lecture-, which will add to the 
social enjoyment of all. We should treat these 
buildings like tremendous plants, and anything that 
tends to stimulate the intellect has its function in 
the schoolhouse. To limit the schoolhouse for 
school purposes only is wrong. It is criminal neg- 
ligence to allow these buildings to remain idle 
when there are organizations that are only too glad 
to utilize them for entertainments, lectures and 
other purposes which add to the enjoyment of life, 
and at the same time which help to broaden and 
improve the mind. In Chicago some years ago we 
were compelled to go to the legislature and ask 
for a law giving us permission to utilize our school 
buildings, valued at more than $25,000,000, for 
other than school purposes. 



Our Country's Needs 

Ex-President Cleveland 
I am profoundly impressed by the conviction that 
the situation now confronting the people of our 
land has directed their attention more to their relief 
from conditions that alarm and startle them 
than to the empty satisfaction of partisan suprem- 
acy. ( >ur country needs conservatism, recupera- 
tion from nervous prostration, reinstatement of 
constitutional observance, buoyant but none the 
less safe and prudent Americanism; scrupulous 
care of every person and every interest entitled to 
care and a "square deal" that means exact and hon- 
est equality before the law and under constitutional 
guaranty. 

Magnitude of Our Tramp Problem 

What the size of the tramp army is no one can 
tell, Inn a vague idea of its magnitude can be 
guessed from the fact that the number of trespass- 
ers killed and injured on American railroads from 
the year 1901 to the year lQO.S, inclusive, of which 
it is estimated that at least two-thirds were tramps 
— amounted to 4 ( ),200; just thirteen times more 
than the number of passengers and more than the 



combined total I passenger- and trainmen killed 
and injured during the same period. Someone has 

estimated that if the number of vagrants on the 

load is in the same proportion to the number of 
int.- killed as the number of trainmen on the 

road is in prop rtion to the number of trainmen 
killed, there must lie more than hall a million 
tramps heating their \\a\ on American railroads 
every year. The annual loss to railroads through 
the destruction of property by tramps has been 
el) estimated bj Major |. ( ;. Pangborn, of the 
Baltimore & i duo. as something like $2,500,000. 

All this represents a tremendous cost to society, 
writes Frances Mamie Bjorkman in the Review of 
Reviews For February in discussing "The New 
Anti- Vagrancy Campaign." The tramp who is in- 
jured on the railroad usually becomes a public 
charge for the rest of his life, anil the tramp who 
is considerate enough to permit himself to be killed 
outright has to be buried, either by the railroad or 
by the county, town, or State in which he loses his 
life. 

And these things are only a part of what it costs 
us to maintain our national joke. Supervisor S. K. 
Kstabrook, of the Wayfarers' Lodges in Phila- 
phia, estimates that, tramps, when they are not on 
the road being fed and lodged by farmers and rail- 
roads, spend one-third of their time in almshouses, 
i ne-third in house:, of correction, and one-third in 
missions and lodging-houses whose rates are so low 
that the price of a bed can readilv be begged on the 
street. At the approach of winter the jails which 
impose no labor on their prisoners are taxed to their 
capacity to accommodate the sudden flood of petty 
malefactors who seem to be hurling themselves into 
the arms of the law. In the summer such mem- 
bers of the constitutionally- fatigued brotherhood as 
are not in the country begging their way, and in- 
cidentally rendering the highways unsafe for wo- 
men and children, are. in the city occupying the 
parks as lodgings and incidentally unfitting the 
park benches for use by any one but themselves. 
* * * 

Public Oversig'ht of Railroad Finances 

If capitalization had been kept small from the 
beginning, and earnings had been properly applied 
to the maintenance and development of the lines, 
we should have seen no such piling up of obliga- 
tions as now hanjpers almost every mile of rail- 
way in the United States. The situation calls im- 
peratively for governmental regulation of issues of 
stocks and bonds. The new legislation that the 
President called for in his message is greatly to be 
desired from all standpoints. Railroads now espe- 
cially need supervision for the protection of the 
holders of their stocks and bonds. The Interstate 
Commerce Commission makes a very favorable re- 
port upon the working of the amended rate law for 
the period of fifteen months during which it has 
been in operation. The point of view of the Ad- 
ministration and of the Interstate Commerce Com- 
missioners is by no means hostile to railroad pros- 
perity. Amendments to existing laws as asked for 
by the Administration would enhance the value of 
railroad investments. The railroads should be al- 
lowed, for example, to make reasonable agreements, 
particularlv as regards the fixing and maintaining 
of rates. On the other hand, they should be pre- 
vented from speculative investment in the stocks of 
other companies, and should be held strictly to their 
duties as common carriers. 



10 



Pacific Outlook 



T 



Written for the Pacific Outlook by Veritas 



"WHY Taft Should Not Be Nominated" is the 
" text of the leaflet which is now being gen- 
erously circulated at Wall Street expense. It is 
an interesting human document. It devotes sev- 
eral thousand words to a distorted exposition of 
the Roosevelt policies. And it devotes a score or 
two of words to. Taft, whose nomination should be 
prevented, because "he stands for all these things." 

It is not necessary to go into particulars. The 
public is already familiar with them. Roosevelt is 
responsible for the recent panic. So is Taft. Roose- 
veit will bring on war with Japan. So will Taft. 
Roosevelt has ursuped legislative power. Taft 
shares the onus of the act. Roosevelt investigated 
the pork-packing establishments of Chicago. There- 
fore, don't nominate Taft. Roosevelt raided the 
capitalists. Taft helped, aided, and abetted. The Fili- 
pinos should be given their independence. Defeat 
Taft. Thus the attack runs, denouncing as vicious 
the very virtues which have endeared Roosevelt to 
the American people, in the development of which 
the name of Taft has ever been coupled with that 
of Roosevelt in the public mind. 

But the leaflet in question, by the very obvious- 
ness of its purpose, tends toward worthy ends. It- 
make him regard retrospectively the achievements 
of the administration which it seeks to discredit. 
What has Theadore Roosevelt accomplished? For 
what has he stood ? In what measure does William 
Howard Taft share the glory or the dishonor of 
these accomplishments, principles, or policies? 

Whatever Roosevelt has -done is due to charac- 
teristic qualities — to courage, honesty, decency, 
morality, faithfulness to his oath and to the people. 
Whatever aid Taft has rendered him in executing 
the policies of his administration is due to a funda- 
mental agreement as to these same qualities. These 
two men love the same human qualities, abhor the 
same qualities. Whatever they have accomplished 
is attributable to this constitutional similarity. In 
Cuba, in the Philippines, in the construction of the 
Panama canal, in their foreign policy, in the regu- 
lation of the railroads and the curbing of the trusts 
— in many other questions in which their voices 
were the voices of the people, their acts the acts 
of the people, they have stood for what is right and 
just and moral and decent. And their courage has 
made them do the things which their other quali- 
ties of mind and soul demanded. 

Candor in our relations with other peoples, pub- 
licity in dealing with our internal problems, have 
been the keynotes of the Roosevelt administration. 
"Turn on the light" has been its motto. The light 
was turned on. It flooded dark corners and for- 
bidding crevices ; but the results have tended to 
strengthen the confidence of the people in Presi- 
dent Roosevelt and the men who stood by him at 
his monumental task. 

The United States gave to Cuba its independ- 
ence. Four years later American occupation was 
re-established. It was quietly, peacefully clone, 



without inflicting a wound to the keen sensibilities 
of the Cuban people. It was .accompanied by a 
pledge that evacuation should occur again when 
the natives had shown greater aptitude for self- 
government. The pledge has since been renewed, 
with a time definitely fixed. The situation was the 
most delicate imaginable. A false step, a lack of 
courtesy or consideration, would have precipitated 
interminable strife, rebellion, revolt, guerrilla war- 
fare, such as harrassed the home government of 
Spain for many years. But the resourcefulness of 
Roosevelt and the tact of Taft leveled the way, and 
to-day Cuba bids fair to progress toward a happy 
future under the tutelage of her American friends. 
If Roosevelt and Taft had done no more than that, 
the world would owe them gratitude. 

Roosevelt inherited the Philippine problem from 
the preceding administration. Whatever policy he 
adopted there he adopted because Taft had inau- 
gurated it and because he had quickly given his im- 
plicit confidence to Taft. Immediately after the 
suppression of the insurrection the army in the 
archchipelago had been reduced from 67,000 to 15,- 
000 men. Taft established civil government. Fili- 
pinos fill most of the offices and their own elective 
assembly has been organized. Secretary Taft's re- 
cent tour of the world would not have been under- 
taken but for the desire to witness the opening ses- 
sion of that assembly. "The Father of the Fili- 
pinos" they acclaimed him, a term as endearing and 
affectionate as the "Father of his Country" applied 
to George Washington to the homeland. The ac- 
complishments of the administration in the Philip- 
pines have been examples of the highest type of 
constructive statecraft. The noblest civic ideals 
have been impressed upon the brown people, who 
are working toward salvation under our guidance. 
There is no more beautiful chapter written in 
American history. 

In the opinion of many, the achievements of the 
Roosevelt administration in Panama stand worthily 
side by side with those in the Philippines. The ad- 
vantages of connecting the waters of the Pacific 
with the waters of the Atlantic had been appreci- 
ated by a long line of President Roosevelt's pre- 
decessors. But not until the Roosevelt administra- 
tion was the treaty negotiated which the Senate 
finally ratified, and which obviated all clanger of 
foreign interference in the great undertaking. 
Events followed each other with startling rapidity 
after that. Construction was authorized ; funds 
were provided ; the route was chosen ; American 
jurisdiction over the canal zone was secured. Every 
succeeding step was marked by good faith and dis- 
interested statesmanship; every step was accom- 
plished without armed conflict and with the hearty 
approval of the people of the United States, of the 
great states of Central and South America, and 
of the Powers of the Old World. The way was 
paved and the work begun. Army engineers were 
placed in charge. Roosevelt and Taft gave it the 



Pacific Outlook 



11 



impetus which has transformed a pest hole into a 
nfort "f the employes has 
u red ; a railroad system has been establish- 
ed; • proceeding energetically, with more 
than two million cubic yards removed last month 
where the removal of a minion cubic yards was 
sidered a marvelous accomplishment but a few 
months before. And though millions upon millions 
have been expended, the cry of "raft has not been 
raised — no', even the whisper of graft. Let Wall 
Street attack that record. 

The position of the L'nited States in the concert 
of nations has been completely changed since the 
the Roosevelt administration. Uncle 
Sam has become one of the commanding figures of 
the world's council. What Secretary of State Root 
has accomplished in the countries to the South 
Secretary of War Taft has duplicated in the Orient 
and in Europe. There is an era of better under- 
Standing, a movement looking to the promotion of 
our export trade, a perpetuation of the reign of 
Peace. Reform of the army and navy has been co- 
incidental with this movement; the marksmanship 
of American gunners has improved; coast defenses 
have been strengthened ; the readiness of the navy 
has been demonstrated by the great cruise of the 
Atlantic battle Meet. For without engines of war 
there can be no abiding peace, and a powerful navy 
is a weapon for peace which none can disregard. It 
had its effect on the jingoes of Japan, and the peace- 
ful mission of the fleet was emphasized by Secre- 
tary Taft's visit to Japan. "Secretary of peace" 
they called the secretary of war in that country, 
and no mission within recent years can compare 
with it in importance or significance. But for the 
better understanding reached between the two coun- 
tries through Secretary Taft's tactful yet candid 
conferences, the tension would have been aggra- 
vated rather than relieved. 

Thus it has been throughout the world, during 
President Roosevelt's incumbency. Every source 
of irritation has been removed. Germany, Great 
Britain and Italy, blockading Venezuela, were per- 
suaded to re-establish peaceful relations — and this 
without threat or blustering. Santo Domingo was 
brought to organize a stable government and to 
recognize the doctrines of international honesty, 
paving the way for her to an era of enlightened 
civilization and prosperity. Japan and Russia, 
grappled in a death struggle, were brought to 
terms, after President Roosevelt had already re- 
stricted their hostile operations to Manchuria and 
Korea. But for such restriction, China would have 
become a prey of the nations, and a world war 
might have been precipitated. That danger re- 
mained while the combat was on. It was the pres- 
ence of that danger that made Roosevelt seek to 
establish peace. He brought the foes face to face; 
he created a world sentiment that cornpelled peace. 
China remained intact, her integrity and the open- 
door policy were maintained. Perhaps Wall Street 
will find fault with that. 

It was the influence of President Roosevelt and 
the United States that preserved the republics to 
the South from the collection of debt by force, and 
it was he who secured their participation in the 
Hague conferences. It was he who gave perman- 
ence to the Hague arbitration tribunal by reference 
to it of certain phases of the Venezuela dispute. 
His influence was used to promote more intimate 




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Broadway, Cor. 3rd 



READ- 

The Right Hand Columns 

The publishers of the PACIFIC OUT- 
LOOK exercise caution in accepting ad- 
vertising contracts; and while it is impos- 
sible to investigate the merits of every 
article or institution advertised, we want to 
know that the advertiser is honest and is 
acting in good fatih before we present his 
announcement to the PACIFIC OUT- 
LOOK'S readers. 

We believe the advertisements in these 
columns to be truthful and worthy of your 
attention. If you want or need any article 
here offered for sale, and you decide to buy 
it, you should go to the firm advertising 
that particular article and purchase it of 
them. Let the advertiser know why you 
are there to purchase — you will receive 
closer attention and better treatment when 
he knows that you are interested in his 
welfare. It's a little thing to do, but it 
pays. 



Otto Stcinen Supply Co. 



Shaving Outfits, Pocket and 
Table Knives, Corkscrews, 
Manicure Goods, Silverware, 
Scissors, Shears, Cutlery 
Specialties and Novelties. 



We grind all kinds of Cutlery and 
do it well. 



210 W. Third St. Los Angeles 




12 



Pacific Outlook 



and harmonious relations between PamAmerican 
states; he brought warring republics "together 
aboard an American man-of-war to make terms of 
peace. If nothing else had been accomplished, it 
were enough to shed undying lustre on the Ameri- 
can people. 

But in the internal affairs of the American re- 
public the' power for good of Theodore Roosevelt 
and William H. Taft has constantly been exerted. 
Private morality and public honesty have been their 
goal. Govermental supervision of railroads and 
laws further controlling the great American trusts 
have been the accomplishments, most distasteful to 
Wall Street, and most satisfactory to the people, 
which distinguish the Roosevelt administration. 
But the policy of conserving the natural resources 
of the country, of preventing the woeful waste that 
has accomplished their exploitation, is destined to 
live in history as the most ambitious programme set 
afoot by any American President. 

Already, during this administration, millions of 
acres of the public domain have been rescued from 
the grasp of the land thieves; irrigation projects 
now under way will add 6,500,000 acres to the pro- 
ductive area of the country, increase the value of 
farm lands by more than $120,000,000 and furnish 
homes for 300,000 families ; the reclamation of 
swamp lands has begun and twenty-five million 
acres now under water will eventually be turned 
into homes and farms, making room for 1,250,000 
families as the flood of immigation is poured on 
our shores from the countries of the old world. A 
national forest policy has been established and 165,- 
000,000 acres are now under government control, 
as against 46,000,000 acres seven years ago, obvi- 
ating the danger of total extinction of their re- 
sources under private management. The governors 
of the states have been invited to attend a White 
House conference in May, at which time steps will 
be taken to preserve the country's resources in tim- 
ber, coal, gas, iron, oil, etc., as well as to devise 
means to conserve the' waterways and protect the 
headwaters of streams. The postoffice department 
corruption has been cleaned out and other depart- 
ments have been renovated. Those who stood in 
the way of an honest investigation of the land 
frauds and prosecution of the swindlers were mer- 
cilessly run over; cities and states were aided in 
securing clean administration ; contributions by cor- 
porations and national banks to campaign funds 
were prohibited by Congress at the President's 
recommendation. 

But constructive as well as reformatory policies 
were put in motion. A new department, that of 
commerce and iabor, was created; the consular 
service was reorganized ; and through supervision 
of railroads the death blow was dealt to the greatest 
evil in our modern industrial fabric. The railroad 
rate law insured equal treatment for the small 
with the largest shipper. Of course the railroad 
and the corporation interests were arrayed against 
the administration in the fight; but the people stood 
by the President and the victory was achieved. The 
law thus written is now being judiciously enforced 
and is giving results which has reconciled those of 
its former opponents, who placed their opposition 
on honest grounds. 

Equal justice for the rich and the poor has been 
one of the Roosevelt-Taft policies. There seemed 
no reason why special interests, being rich and 
powerful, should be excepted from the operation of 









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Yosemite Valley 

Open to Tourists 

Winter Summer 

via 

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Fare only tip 50 R° unc l Trip 
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Fine Vestibule Train Leaves Merced Daily at 2:30 p. m. 

See Yosemite this winter — nature's vast amphi- 
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Get our free literature describing the "Kite". 

E. W. McGee, 334 So. Spring St. 



Pacific Outlook 



18 



the laws, nor \vl and political prestige 

perate. Xor did tl 'it recog 

nizf any special privilege on the part of labor or- 
ganizations. The law* were to be enforced: h< 
forced them against a United States senator. 
Where they wen- inadequate, he demanded their 
amendment; and it became speedilv evident that 
they ii" longer sufficed to regulate the accumula 
ti>>Ti and distribution of wealth. No hasty or ill- 
advised action was taken. Inquiry preceded even 
step. Abuses were quickly made patent and cor 
rective measures were devised in a spirit of sober 
self-restraint. Publicity was the weapon first 
evoked; and publicity gave to the people the insur- 
ance scandals, the railroad scandals, the stock job- 
bing scandals. 

The enactment of corporation and railroad laws 
was a logical result; the prosecution of the Stand- 
ard t hi trust, resulting in the imposition of a $29,- 
000.000 fine, another. The resentment of men of 
the John D. Rockefeller and Edward H. Harriman 
stripe followed unavoidably. The light had been 
turned on and publicity exposed those who neces- 
sarily would resent such a programme as the one 
the administration has outlined. In the opinion or 
President Roosevelt, there was nothing to conceal; 
in the opinion of Rockfeller and Harriman there 
was everything to conceal. President Roosevelt 
acted on the conviction that honest corporations 
had nothing" to fear from publicity; there was no 
reason to spare the others. The beef trust, the to- 
bacco trust, the sugar trust. Standard Oil, Harri- 
man and the others interposed every possible ob- 
stacle: they hampered all investigations to the full 
of their ability. But it availed them not. The CJ. P. 
and S. P. merger, the manipulation of the Chicago 
and Alton, securing of unreasonable profits by the 
Standard Oil through the granting of rebates, the 
amassing of colossal fortunes bv railroad officials 
through the same means, the criminal partnership 
which existed between certain shippers and certain 
railroads — all these are pages of an open book to- 
dav. These exposures put in motion forces that led 
to a change. Laws of sound and wholesome nature 
were written on the statute books; real values were 
conserved : there was no quarrel with honest 
wealth. But the railroad speculators wdio played 
the Wall Street game found a skillful player op- 
posed ; and honesty carried the day. 

Without reference to one or two other incidents' 
of the Roosevelt administration this article would 
be incomplete. For one of the greatest accomplish- 
ments of modern times was the adjudication of the 
anthractie coal strike, which certain of the mine 
owners resented as 'interference in private affairs.'' 
the sufferings of the people being, in their opinion, 
no business of the President or the public. What 
they wanted was a President who would call out 
troops and drive the miners back to work; what 
they got was an act that brought peace and pros- 
perity to the anthracite coal region of Pennsylvania, 
an act which has the approval of wage earners and 
employer alike, which put an end to arrogance and 
provided means for the harmonizing of differences 
between capital and labor. 

Another act of "interference" was the investiga- 
tion of the nauseous packing-house conditions, 
which resulted in bringing about adequate federal 
inspection, and which restored the confidence of the 
public in the inspected meat supply. Xor have the 



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Pacific Outlook 



packers themselves suffered, for domestic and for- 
eign trade in meat products has long since resumed, 
even exceeded, normal proportions. The pure food 
law, also, is a child of this investigation, and decep- 
tion and fraud, once the rule, are now the exception. 
Reforms of such far-reaching character could not 
be quietly accomplished. They could not be ac- 
complished without creating enduring animosities. 
As exposure of corruption in high places tread on 
each others' heels, mistrust and suspicion ensued. 
The people withdrew their support from certain men 
of affairs in whose enterprises they had invested 
money. Dishonest financiers had sown the wind ; 
they reaped as they sowed. Some among them .wel- 
comed the situation ; they aided it in order to arouse 
a public fear that exposure in high places might 
mean suffering among the less exalted. Such a 
sentiment would in the end aid them to escape the 
penalty of their acts. But again they reckoned 
without the President. A word from him sufficed 
to recall the panic-stricken to their senses, and to- 
day the situation, again fully in hand, is thoroughly 
understood throughout the length and breadth of 
the land. The public conscience has been aroused; 
a higher ethical conduct in the community at large 
is demanded. 

And Roosevelt and his policies and his admin- 
istration and his chief advisers — and none ranks 
higher among them than W. H. Taft — are responsi- 
ble for it. Is it any wonder that an earnest man, 
of the stripe of Theodore Roosevelt, demands that 
these .policies be carried forward? 

* ¥ * 

America's LacK 

When Oscar Wilde visited this country in the 
winter of 1881-82, he went to Washington, where 
he was greatly feted, says the New York Tribune. 
After he was the guest of the Secretary of State, 
Mr. Blaine, Mrs. Pendleton gave a dinner in his 
honor. Seated at her right hand, Wilde was most 
entertaining, giving impressions of the United 
States in his own peculiar vein. Having listened 
most courteously to these, Mrs. Pendleton turned 
to her guest and said: 

"Mr. Wilde, you have not yet told us, as most 
Englishmen are prone to do, what you miss most 
in America?" 

"Your lack of -ruins and curiosities," answered 
Wilde rather curtly. 

Mrs. Pendleton smiled, paused a second, and re- 
plied, "Time will give us our ruins, Mr. Wilde ; and 
as for our curiosities, we import them." 

An irrepressible laugh ran round the table, in 
which no one joined more heartily than Wilde. 

* * * 

She Was tKe Proof 

Nervous Lady Passenger (to deck hand) — Have 
you ever seen any worse weather than this, Mister 
Sailor? Deck Hand — Take a word from an old salt, 
mum. The weather's never very bad while there's 
any females on deck a-making inquiries about it. — 
Sketch. 

* * * 

Ag'ainst Female Footpads 

In several instances women have lately figured, 
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protect himself unless he go armed with a live 
mouse. — Philadelphia Ledger. 




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Pacific Outlook 



15 



* 


Diving' Uimdler A Church 


4 

4 



A .Strange Sight at Winchester Cathedral 

BY LANIER BARTLETT 



Dow ti where the dear little old town of Winches- 
ter nestles beside the purlins; river Itchen. in the 
sweet Hampshire country of England, there stands 

in hoary solemnity one of the greatest of the aged 
religious monuments of Great Britain — Winchester 
Cathedral, William of Wykeham's church. It is a 
splendid example of the architecture of its period. 
is this gray old-timer of Christianity, rising beauti- 
fully from the immaculate greensward of its sur- 
rounding park and graveyard, which much time has 
ciowded with the molderings of much death. In- 
deed, so old is most of the death which the weather- 
beaten grave stones represent that the sense of 
any intimate sadness is losl in wandering through 
it. and the quaint thoughts so quaintly expressed 
on the graven tablets arc more likclx in produce a 
touch of humor than of respectful regret in him 
who strolls curiously among the carved names of 
other centuries. 

A careful tour through this fine old cathedral 
with one wdio is really acquainted with its history 
and the story of the ruins which are interwoven 
with its later walls is as fascinating an experience 
as any retrospective mind could hope to enjoy; but 
to the average visitor the most striking thing to 
he met with about these ancient premises just now 
is the unique modern work which is being carried 
on there by the government in the effort to save the 
precious edifice from collapse. 

Here in California we set great store by the re- 
mains of our old Missions and have done much 
o mmendable work of restoration, so we may well 
appreciate the heavy task which is being under- 
taken in England now of saving from decay those 
monuments of its early Christian career which are 
of so much greater architectural value and necessi- 
tate a so much vaster skill and expenditure in re- 
pairing that it makes our little task with the Mis- 
sions here seem as a mere nothing. This work of 
strengthening the old cathedrals is going on all over 
England. The aged edifices seem to have developed 
alarming symptoms at about the same time and the 
English have awakened to a realization that con- 
certed action is necessary to save them from ulti- 
mate ruin. Even St. Paul's in London is very seri- 
ously affected, and it is a grave question among 
English engineers as to what had best be done to 
steady the sagging foundations, the weakness of 
which is shown in the cracking of the dome. 

Xo where is this salvage work so interesting as at 
Winchester, for here is to be seen the anomalv of 
a diver in a regulation diving dress working at the 
foundations of an inland church. Apparently the 
site of the Winchester Cathedral was a bog in early 
times and investigation has discovered that the 
foundations of the building stand in water of con- 
siderable depth today. This has slowly undermine 1 
most of the edifice until some of the walls have 
reached so near to the point of collapse that they 
have had to be propped with immense timbers while 
the relaxing of the foundations proceeds. 



Wax down in the dim crypt of the building a 
shaft lias been sunk alongside one of the important 
buttresses, and into the vile Mack water that seeps 
from innumerable graves sinks the nervy diver 
every morning and works through llie eight-hour 
day of the average mason. lie is engaged in re- 
building the foundations with cement blocks. It is 
doubtful if a civilized workman can be found who 
is employed in a task of more disagreeable appear- 
ance than is this fellow. Yet he goes about his 
work as calmly as any of the masons who are en- 
gaged above the sod and reeking slush. When 
the writer saw him he was sitting restfully on a 
pile of building material down in the dark, lantern- 
lit under part of the cathedral, not far from the 
mouth of the shaft, taking a pull at his pipe during 
one of his brief periods of rest : and it was hard to 
make him understand why anyone should be par- 
ticularly interested in the queer task upon which 
he was employed. In fact, he avoided the publicity 
wdiich he saw threatening him 1 by diving back into 
the swamp like a muskrat. It was said that he re- 
ceived a wage of fort}' shillings, or about ten dol- 
lars a day, for groping down there in the invisible 
region of the dead. 

A most interesting fact which has been noted 
with relation to the weakening of the walls of the 
Winchester Cathedral is this: On its site once 
stood two adjoining Roman temples, one dedicated 
to Apollo and the other to Concord. Wherever the 
cathedral walls have followed the original Roman 
foundations they appear as firm as when first built; 
wherever they overlap the outline of the old Roman 
basilicas they are sinking. The Romans, those mas- 
ter builders, found bedrock, wdiich the Normans 
and subsequent builders neglected to do. 

Winchester was the "Caer Gwent" of the Britons 
and the "Venta Belgarum" of the Romans, and was 
a town of much importance in early times, largely 
on account of its central position on the Roman 
highways in the south of England. In the third 
century it became one of the chief centers of the 
Celtic Christians and some students hold that the 
strange little un-Norman crypt under the great 
cathedral represents the remains of the original 
Christian chapel of that date. 

The Saxon invaders, at the end of the fifth cen- 
turv, transformed the Roman word "Venta" into 
"White" and called the town "Winteceaster", or 
"City of the Winter". In the sixth century it be- 
came the capital of Wessex and the kings of W r es- 
sex were crowned and buried in the cathedral. 
Even after the Norman conquest many sovereigns 
were crowned here. 

The first Christian church is said to have been 
destroyed during the Aurelian persecutions in 293. 
After restoration it was burned by the Saxons in 
495. A greater cathedral was begun by Bishop 
Walkelin in 1070, and of this building two Norman 
transepts and the low central tower still exist, in- 
corporated in the present structure which was com- 



1U 



Pacific Outlook 



menced by William of Wykeham at the end of the 
fourteenth century. 

The Winchester Cathedral has a length of 546 
feet, making it the longest church in England with 
the exception of St. Alban's, which is about the same 
size. Many of the magnificent fourteenth-centurs' 
stained glass windows still exist. 

The preservation of this historic building is to 
cost thousands of pounds, and the work already has 
been going on for over three years. 
* * * 
Modern Apache Cunning 

That all the characteristics of early Western life 
have not yet been blotted out. is made apparent by 
the following account, in a recent issue of the Al- 
buquerque Journal, of the old-time astuteness of 
modern reservation Apaches in the trailing of an 
enemy. The dispatch, dated Alamogordo, N. M., 
says: 

It was a most gruesome sight that met the eyes 
of the court house janitor yesterday morning when 
he arrived at the court house to open up the several 
offices and put them in readiness for the day's work , 
On entering the sheriff's office he started back in 
amazement. Strewn over the floor, wrapped in 
their blankets, were a dozen Mescalero Apache In- 
dians, their rifles lying beside them. In the jail 
was, the dead body of "Blind Ike," the Indian whom 
they had been trailing and whom they shot to death 
as soon as discovered. The news of the capture 
spread rapidly, and from daybreak until after the 
inquest, about 11 o'clock, the court house and yard 
were thronged with people eager to get a look at the 
dead outlaw — "a good Indian," as many expressed 
it. It is said the deceased was shot twelve times, 
but this was hard to determine. His head, should- 
ers and chest seemed riddled with bullets. After 
the inquest his body was taken out into the court 
yard where a local photographer took a picture of 
the filthy and bloody remains, the undertaker then 
taking charge. He was buried in an obscure corner 
of the local cemetery today. 



The Indian who, has so surely paid the penalty of 
his latest crime, was considered a dangerous man 
by his associates on the reservation, and when the 
opportunity presented itself for them to take up the 
trail they did it with a whoop of joy. Sheriff Denny 
was forced in the rear by the Indians, who im- 
pressed upon him the fact that as soon as they came 
up to the fugitive he would first kill the squaw and 
then shoot the white men; the Indians he would 
not harm. It is the supposition here that this was 
done for the reason they feared the sheriff would 
take him alive, and they desired that he be killed 
and thus be forever out of the way. Whether or 
not there is an}' foundation for this report, it is 
hard to say. At any rate, he was killed, and by the 
Indian trailers. 

There seems to be no doubt that he was the mur- 
derer of young McLain, who, in the employ of the 
Flying H ranch, was sent out to round up the miss- 
ing cattle. Upon coming up on the Indian, who 
had killed one of the steers, the Indian was sur- 
prised, being deal. They evidently thought the best 
plan was to kill him. He remained on the reserva- 
tion until the body was found and the authorities 
had assembled at the place of finding the body. It 
was then he took his squaw and horse and started 
for Mexico, through the Sacramentos. The Indian 
trailers never for a moment lost the trail, once they 
took it up at the place of the killing. Over arid 
wastes, through the mountain defiles, through a 
herd of range horses, they went right ahead until 
they found their man. It was a latter-day exempli- 
fication of the Indian cunning so little heard of at 
this day. 

* * * 

Designs on His Throat 

Judge (to prisoner just condemned to death) — 
You have the legal right to express a last wish, and 
if it is possible it will be granted. Prisoner (a bar- 
ber) — I should like just once more to be allowed 
to shave the district attorney. — Boston Globe. 




Pacific Outlook 



17 




Spring Song 



on the wane 
And Spring bring 

This rule by win - from France— 

"Buy your hair to match your hat!" 

If on one side your headpiece tilts, 

"lis apt i" leave .1 surface flat; 

fluffy puffs should be ap] 

But — buy the hair to match the hat! 






The Humanitarian and the Girl 

The Humanitarian took the Practical Girl to the 
Auditorium one day last week. They had box seats, 
e was not obliged i • lake off her new bird hat. 
This pleased her. It worried him. Two tine lines 
appeared between his strongly marked William 
Desmond eyebrows even time he looked at her 
hat; for though he is handsome, the Humanitarian 
is a very serious fellow. The ['radical Girl was so 
gay and happy that he hated to speak, but duty 
urged him on. 

"Did von see that article in the Saturday Even- 
ing Post a few weeks ago?" he began, somewhat 
cautiously, because the Practical Girl, pretty as she 
is. lias a tongue. 

"You mean that one that described how herons 
were slaughtered in order that we thoughtless wo- 
men might have trimming for our hats?" she inter- 
rupted. 

"What did you think of it?" 

"Is this to be a lecture on the subject of cruelty 
to animals just because I happen to have a hat with 
a few feathers on it ?" demanded the Practical Girl, 

spiritedly. 

"It's a whole bird— wings, bill, Dpdy and all — 
ugh! A dead bird," said the Humanitarian. 

"I see I shall have to take your education in hand. 
It is time some of that useless sentimentality should 
be eradicated from your system." she replied, un- 
ruffled, looking at the Humanitarian sadly. "You 
think I am a barbarian for wearing a bunch of dyed 
chicken feathers arranged to look like some ornitho- 
logical specimen that "was never known to man or 
nature. By the way, you like chicken, don't you— 
fried?" 

"Yes," replied the Humanitarian, weakly. 
"Cannibal !" 
"1 sav now — " 

"That is just what you are. Now, I never eat 
lledi Think of the sufferings of the poor chicken. 
( )ne minute gaily pursuing the bug through the green 
grass— the next prostrate and kicking blindly, trying 
to reach its severed and bleeding head at the other side 
of the yard, while the murderer stands with his bleed- 
ing axe. watching unmoved the death struggles of his 
victim. And what is the sacrifice for? That you, 
who feel so sorry for the birds you can't eat, may 
have a gastronomic festival— fried, a la Maryland." 

"But, I sav — " 

"Now wait till I finish. After the poor little creature 
has been prepared for the cooking, the feathers are 



thrown over the fence — you can t carillon, you know. 
Along comes my milliner, who gathers them up and 
takes them to his work room, from which they issue in 
the form of this beautiful ornament you observe on 
my hat. The leavings from .the poor crt'aturc slain 
to administer to your cannibalistic appetite is taken to 
create a thing of beautj to satisfy my aesthetic soul. 
Are you quite squelched ?" 

"Quite," responded the Humanitarian. "The hat is 
pretty and becoming." 

"Thanks; you ought to have said that in the begin- 
ning." she replied, turning her big, innocent eyes on 
the stage, where the curtain was rising on the next act. 



Society at the Opera 

That society is genuinely appreciative of good music 
was evidenced by the very good audiences at the four 
performances of "Madame Butterfly." Monday night's 
audience was especially brilliant. To a large part of 
those attending the handsomely attired groups in the 
boxes were almost as much an object of observation as 
the people behind the footlights. 

Miss Leila Holterhoff was the guest of honor in a 
party of twenty given by Mr. and Airs. E. P. Clark. 
Mrs. Alfred Solano entertained in one box and Louis 
G. Vetter was the host in another. Others who gave 
box parties were Mr. and Mrs. Frank Pixley, who 
had Air. and Mrs. Cosmo Morgan with them; Earle 
Anthony, Mr. and Mrs. John V. Posey, Leo Young- 
worth, Mr. and Mrs. George J. Denis; Adolph Fleish- - 
man. who had as his guests Mr. and Mrs. Louis Cole, 
the Misses Flossie Marks, Amy Hellman, Lena Marks, 
Rosaline Seligman, anil Messrs. Alen Brownstein, Carl 
Steinleiu. Marco H. Hellman and J. Marks. 



Boris de Londonier Gives Tea 
Saturday Boris de Londonier entertains Adela Yerne 
and Stanley Josling with a musical and tea. The pro- 
gramme arranged consists of numbers by Mrs. Robert 
Farquhar, Miss Blanche Ruby, Miss Emily May Wil- 
son, and Miss Blanche Brocklebank. The guests in- 
clude Mrs. John P. Jones, of Santa Monica, Mr. and 
Mrs. Hancock Banning, Mr. and Mrs. George Denis, 
Mr. and Mrs. Roy Jones, Mrs. H. C. Hooker. Mrs. W. 
C. Curtis, Mrs. Cornelia Goodwin. Mrs. Edwin T. 
Earl, Mrs. Mark Sibley Severance. Mrs. Walter Jar- 
vis Barlow. Mrs. D. C. McCann, Airs. George Wear- 
ing. Airs. I. E. Ingraham. Airs. Avery .McCarthy, Airs. 
Eugene Overton, Aliss Laura Grover Smith, Aliss 
Alice Denis, Aliss Echo Allen, Aliss Georgina Jones, 
Aliss Grace Melius, Aliss Elizabeth Jordan, Aliss Alable 
Horn, Aliss Angel Shipman, Alessrs. LaHaie, Peje 
Storck, Gregory Perkins. Count Axel Wachtmeister, 
Edmund Denis, Robert Farquhar, Pandia Ralli Denis, 
Jack Rubie. 



Marjorie Brown's Return 

Aliss Marjorie Brown is expected home early in 
Alarch from Xew York, where she has been studying 
very seriously for the past year under the best music 



18 



Pacific Outlook 



masters, and at the same time enjoying many social 
attentions. Miss Brown's friends will not have a 
chance to see very much oLher, as her stay is to be 
short, only long enough to rest a bit and get ready to 
go to Europe to continue her studies. It was only after 
the best critics in the East had passed favorably on her 
voice that Miss Brown decided to try for a professional 
career. Walter Damrosch, in whose conservatory she 
took a course in old branches of music and acting, 
said she would certainly make a name for herself in 
opera. Matja Nissen Stone, pupil of Lili Lehman, 
gave Miss Brown private lessons in the vocal art and 
encouraged her to go on in her chosen career. 

In addition to her beautiful dramatic soprano voice. 
Miss Brown is an accomplished linguist, having a com- 
mand of five languages, speaking French with a per- 
fect accent. She will go first to Paris. 

Miss Dimple Dyas Engaged 

From St. Louis comes, the announcement of the en- 
gagement of Miss Dimple Dyas, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Richard J. Dyas, to Morten Flarris, a Chicago 
capitalist. This news will be of great interest to Los 
Angeles society, as the young woman, who is exceed- 
ingly pretty and accomplished, passed several seasons 
here, and was the object of much attention. This news 
became public shortly after the announcement of the 
engagement of the brother of Miss Dyas, Bernal Dyas, 
to Nan Marsh. The wedding of the two last named 
will precede that of the Miss Dyas and Mr. Harris, 
which will take place in April. 



Another Interesting Engagement 

The engagement of Earle Youmans Boothe of South 
Pasadena and Miss Ethel McGrew Monypeny, daugh- 
ter of William Monypeny, Jr., of Columbus, Ohio, 
is announced. The family. of Miss Monypeny is win- 
tering in Southern California and the wedding will 
take place on the evening of February 26, in St. Paul's 
Pro-Cathedral. 



Mrs. Robe'rt A. Rowan gave a luncheon Saturday at 
her Orange Grove avenue home in Pasadena, in honor 
of Mrs. Robert Farquhar of Santa Monica. The other 
guests were Mrs. William R. Staats, Mrs. Samuel 
Cupples Pierce, Mrs. J. Howard Dews, Mrs. William 
Burns, Mrs. H. Page Warden, Mrs. John B. Miller, 
Mrs. Chapman Smith, Mrs. Thaddeus Up de Graff, 
and Miss Marion McGilvray. 

The Treble Clef Club of which Mrs. Edwin H. 
Cooper is president, will entertain with a Valentine 
party at the Ebell clubhouse next Wednesday evening. 
Cards and dancing will form the evening's pleasure. 
Assisting the president in receiving will be Mines. 
Carrie Stone Freeman, E. H. Sargeant, Lillian Fruh- 
lin Frances Thoroughman, J. Hammer, Martha Hunt- 
er, W. G. Eisenmayer and Fred H. Jones. 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Huntington are entertaining 
the latter's sister. Miss Ruth Green, a society belle of 
Berkeley, their mother, Mrs. Ada Green, and Mrs. 
M. A. Huntington, of San Francisco. Miss Green's 
engagement to George Jones of the University town, 
was announced recently and their wedding will be one 
of the social events of April in tire North. 

A box party was given at the Belasco Thursday af- 
ternoon by the Misses Mary and Gertrude Workman 
in honor of Mrs. Harry Watson of Mt. Vernon, 111., 
who is a guest at the home of Mrs. Boyle Workman. 



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Pacific Outlook 



19 



- the performance the party had tea at the Copper 
Kettle. The guests were Mrs. \Y. F. Kennedy, Mrs. 
W. T. lohnston, Mrs. \\ . H. Holmes, Mrs. Mary 
Schallert, Mr-. Daniel Laubersheimer, Mrs. Arthur 
l'.ralv. Mr-. Boyle Workman, Mi-s Sada Johnson, Mr-. 
Conrad Krebs, Mi-s Kate Spence, Miss Emma Bu- 
miller, Miss Bess Stoddard, Miss Cora Foy, Miss 
Millar. Mi-s Edna Foy, Miss Gilletta Workman 
and Miss Florence Foy. 

Miss Margaret Ida Hasson, daughter of Mrs. C. N. 
Hasson, 1115 I louver street, i- to be married in the 
near future to Raymond D. Frisbie, a young business 
man of Tonapah, Nev. Miss Hasson is a native 
daughter and a member of a uell-kn >\vn pioneer fam- 
ily. Her father, the late C. X. Hasson, was a banker 
and mine owner. 

Mrs. Jean Drake of Long Beach gave a box party 
Saturday afternoon at the Belasco in honor of Mi-s 
Kate Macomber. The other guests were Mrs. J. J. 
fenkins, Miss Elizabeth Woodville, Mrs. Roy Seeley, 
"Mi-s Helen Sinclair. Miss Elizabeth Drake. Miss Pen- 
ita Drake and Mrs. John Kingsley Macomber, Jr. 

Thursday night of last week Senator and Mrs. Cor- 
nelius Cole, of Colegrove, gave a dinner for Stanley 
Josling. the well-known miniature painter of London. 
< rther guests included Mr. and Mrs. Stirling Calder, 
of Pasadena, Mrs. Emma Cole-Brown, Peje Storck, 
Joseph : ireenbaum, Boris de Londonier. 

Miss Mathilde Bartlett will give a Valentine dancing 
party the evening of February 11 at the family home, 
No. 2400 West Adams street.' The scheme of decora- 
tion will be symbolic of the approaching festivalof St. 
Valentine, twenty-five couples have been invited. 

Mrs. Leah Seeley entertained Tuesday evening at 
her home on South Figueroa street in honor of three 
Eastern girls who are spending the winter here, the 
Misses Tulia McConn and Mary Shedherd of Ft. Mad- 
ison, la., and Lista Littlefield of New York. 

Mr. and Mrs. George A. Simpson gave a musical 
Tuesday evening at their home, 1500 Fourth avenue, 
in honor of Mrs. Charles S. Bigelow of Boston, who 
is visiting her sister, Mrs. Henry Henderson. 1303 
West lake avenue. 

A morning musical was given at the home of Mrs. 
Walter Jarvis Barlow, Thursday, the programme be- 
ing the fourth in the series of historical musical reci- 
tals by Miss Margaret Goetz of New York. 
* * * 

AMONG THE WOMEN'S CLUBS 



How Fashionable They're Getting 
By One of Them 

In the language of the boulevard, the Press Club is 
certainly going some. By Press Club, of course, is 
meant the Woman's Press Club of Southern Califor- 
nia. There once was another of masculine gender, but 
it was a frail young thing of sickly constitution and 
died in its infancy. To return to the subject. But 
two short years ago we were lunching at Christopher's 
at thirty-five cents a plate and now it is swell Hotel 
( ireen in Pasadena, with the spread in the roof garden. 
surrounded by millionaires, gold-buttoned flunkeys and 
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20 



Pacific Outlook 



the Green, where the Pasadena women will be as- 
sembled to welcome our Los Angeles contingent and 
make them at home in the luxurious atmosphere, and 
where we are to be permitted to lionize Chevalier 
Frank Pixley and Robert J. Burdette, D. D., guests of 
honor. Then it is to the bee-u-ti-ful roof garden — 
glass enclosed — where the luncheon is to be served in 
the midst of the palms and tropical flowers. The 
merely-rich hotel guests will be permitted to look at 
us from the outside. After the luncheon Dr. Burdette 
and Mr. Pixley have kindly consented to utter a few 
witticisms for us, and then members of the club will 
see what they can do in the same line. Several of us 
are pretty good at the impromptu after dinner effort, 
if one does say it who shouldn't. 

The two men are not the only intellectual lights 
among the guests. Not by any means. Miss Bertha 
Corbett will be there, and Miss Phillips of Chicago, the 
writer of children's stories, and Mrs. Carrie Jacob 



The Ebell 

It was a bewildering historical pageant that took 
place at the Ebell Club Monday, when one hundred 
and twenty members appeared in the costumes of all 
nations and gave the national street cries. Great 
pains had been taken to have the costumes correct as 
to the period and country represented, and the result 
was a brilliant kaleidoscopic spectacle. England under 
Elizabeth and Egypt under Ramases, the colonial days 
of America, and Spain under Phillip, were a few of 
the periods portrayed. In the grand march that 
opened the programme were Italian monks, Spanish 
dancing girls, colonial dames, German fraus and Japa- 
nese women. A group of school girls in charge of 
Mrs. W. C. Vallikett, gave a tableau, representing a 
picture of Madelene Lemiare. 

This very successful afternoon was arranged by the 
art and travel section. Those having charge of the 
different parts were. Remarks, Mrs. C. Q. Stanton, 




Pretty Scene at the Ebeli, Monday 



Bond, the composer, and Mrs. Gertrude Potter Dan- 
iels of Chicago ; Mrs. Robert J. Burdette and Mrs. 
Pixley. Miss Alice Eyton, a well-known newspaper 
writer of Australia, and who has been building plays 
since coming to Los Angeles two years ago, will be 
another guest. As the club numbers seventy-five mem- 
bers, and each one usually brings a guest, there will 
be quite a gathering. 

It is to be a Valentine luncheon. All the appoint- 
ments will be suggestive of the tender passion — bleed- 
ing hearts, Cupids with their quivers full — and all that 
sort of thing. 

Mrs. G: G. Green, wife of the owner of the hotel, 
and Mrs. J. H. Holmes, whose husband is manager, 
will receive with the following Pasadena members : 
Mrs. Una Nixon Hopkins, Miss Ada Trotter, Miss 
Martha Dietrichson, Miss Grace Hortense Tower, 
Mrs. S. D. P. Randolph, Mme. Verra de Blumenthal, 
Mrs. C. W. Coman, Gussie Packard Du Bois, Miss 
Neally Stevens. 



Photo by Lcs Angeles Herald 

curator; grand march, Miss Alice Mitton, leader, Mrs. 
Harmon D. Ryus, pianist ; Egypt, in charge of Mrs. 

B. N. Pratt, the call to Allah, the water and beggar 
criers ; Greece, in charge of Mrs. C. E. Curtis, the 
maiden's greeting to Athena ; Italy, in charge of Mrs. 

C. A. Stavnow, "The Italian Comedy" as given in the 
streets, fourteenth century, Columbine, Harlequin, 
Patolone, Pietro ; Spain, in charge of Miss Constance 
Britt, sunshine and shadow of Spanish street life ; 
school girls in charge of Mrs. W. C. Vallikett, from a 
picture by Madelene Lemaire ; France, in charge of 
Madame Donato and Miss Edith Mitchell, criers from 
the provinces in the streets of Paris ; Germany, in 
charge of Mrs. E. W. Britt, peasant women passing 
before the statue of Germania at Niederwald on the 
Rhine ; Holland, in charge of Mrs. Henry Z. Osborne, 
Jr., the calls of the peasant girls ; England, in charge 
of Mrs. James B. Stearns, Elizabethan and Shakes- 
pearean cries ; Japan, in charge of, Mrs. W. H. Frost, 
selecting Japanese prints ; China, in charge of Mrs. 



Pacific Outlook 



21 



(rock and Mr-. Allison Barlow, bridal pro- 

Mexico, in charge of Mr-, G. II. Mosher, the 

grand dames and the criers: America, in charge of 

Mr-. K. W. Dromg »kl, .'tir colonial dames and the 

criers. 



Friday Morning 

At the Tuesday aftern on tea ol the Friday Morn- 
ing Club this week, a verj enjoyable diversi >n was 
offered by the appearance of Mi-- \ irginia Wright, 
known t<> the theater-going public as Miss Virginia 
Berry, who gave two bright monologues. Mrs. George 
V. Wright, one of the pioneer members, is the mother 
of Mis- Virginia, so the club's interest in the young 
.woman, who ha- but recently started out on a pro- 
fessional career, i- more than friendly. 

The monologues were given in very good style and 
were warmly applauded.. Miss Wright will leave in a 
few days for San Diego, where she has been engaged 
as leading' ingenue in the I sis Theater Stock Company. 

Mrs. Charles Park of Massachusetts was also a 
guest of the afternoon, and made an address advocat- 
ing equal suffrage. Mr-. Parks is a graduate of Rad- 
cliffe College and ha- done considerable work in the 
settlement maintained by that college in Boston. Here 
she is making' an effort to organize college women to 
campaign for political equality. Three medical author- 
ities on tuberculosis. Dr. Norman Bridge, Dr. George 
H. Kress and Dr. F. M. Pottinger, addressed the club 
at its regular meeting Friday. 



Ruskin Art 
Mrs. J. D. Gibbs and Mrs. Henderson Hayvvard had 
charge of the meeting of the Ruskin Art Wednesday, 
when American etchers were discussed. The artists 
whose work was taken up were : Farrar, the Morans, 
Parrish, Piatt. Bacher, Coxe, Pennall, and others. 
'"Mezzotint," will be the subject next week, Mrs. J. W. 
Hendrick and Mrs. Georg'e Hutton leading. 



Political Equality 
Dr. Ada Patterson will be the speaker at the meet- 
ing of the Political Eqality League in the Woman's 
Clubhouse Saturday afternoon at 2 :30. Dr. Patterson 
is a brilliant speaker of deep learning and wide culture, 
the possessor of degrees from two German universi- 
ties and one American. Her subject is: "Woman As 
She Is ; As She Ought to Be ; As She Will Be." A 
discussion will follow the address. 

* * * 

Constable — Come along ; you've got to have a bath. 
Tramp — A bath ! What, with water ? Constable — 
Yes, of course. Tramp — Couldn't you manage it with 
one o' them vacuum cleaners? — New York Globe. 

* * * 

The religious editor was struggling with the query, 
"Is it a sin to play poker?" After much prayerful 
consideration, he wrote the following reply: "Yes, 
the way some people play it." — Philadelphia Press. 

* * * 

Dycut Funker — But I do not think I deserve an 
absolute zero. Professor — Neither do I, but that is 
tiie lowest mark I am allowed to give. — Harvard Lam- 
poon. 

* * * 

Bill — Do you find it hard to dodge that bill collector 
now? Jill— Sure; harder than ever. He goes about 
i'-. an automobile, you know. — Yonkers Statesman. 




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Pacific Outlook 



UNDER THE SKYLIGHTS 



By Perez Field 

Man seems to be possessed of at least two forms 
of consciousness : the familiar one of everyday life 
which notes and observes the passing events of the 
hour and another form of consciousness which is 
more subtle. Of this latter we are aware when in 
a brown study or absent minded as the phrase goes. 
We may call the first the personal consciousness 
and the last the larger consciousness. The personal 
consciousness is amenable to reason,, the larger con- 
sciousness to intuition. The first expresses itself 
in science, the second in art. 

All art is eclectic, and according to the quality 
of the choice made is it either of a good or mediocre 
sort. No art can be all bad, as there must be al- 
ways somewhat of selection. It is the mixing in of 
too much of the personal consciousness with art 
which makes it common place or rudimentary. It is 
the personal consciousness in a comic valentine 
which makes it offensive. Its vogue is based on 
another's pian. The predominance of the lower or 
higher consciousness in the creation of any object 
gives us two kinds of art which we may distinguish 




Marine View bv Ruysdael, on Exhibition at tbe 
Hotel Maryland 

by the inspired, like a myth. Sentimental art is 
picturesque, like a loafer eating cheese with his 
stiletto. Sentiment in art is the outcome of that 
abominable thing "the artistic temperament", the 
vehicle of outcast emotions. It is of this sort of 
art which we wish to speak. 

What do we mean when we call anything pic- 
turesque? A little observation will show that it 
alwavs implies someone's suffering, someone's pain, 
somebody else's fortitude under burdens: Our own 
discomfort is not picturesque ; it is hateful. What- 
ever enjoyment is to be had from sentimental art 
comes from the contemplation of the misery of 
another. Pictures of the crucifixion are of this 
order. Furthermore, sentimental art is not useful. 
It glories in decay. No one thinks plumbing pic- 
turesque, only the lack of it is so. One does not 
visit San Malo for its modern improvements, but 
for the generations of drunken license its walls 
have imprisoned. The artistic material in that de- 
lightful old town is abundant and beyond praise. 
If it were as healthful and modern as the neighbor- 



ing town of Parame, not thousands of visitors would 
flock to see it, as they do every season now, but 
scores only, of inartistic folk be it insisted. When 
we visit Lake Como, for instance, it is not the 
breezy and open square of the city of Como itself 
which attracts us, but the picturesque, narrow, 
dingy, and malodorous streets and steps of Bellano 
or Men'aggio, where we find beautiful color, mys- 
terious shadows and human misery, — ill-health and 
garrulous iniquity. It is all great fun- — and so pic- 
turesque ! Come let us, unpolluted souls that we 
are, view these dens of dumb tragedy and buy 
sketches, charming bits, of these silent walls crust- 
ed with anguish. There is no denying the fact that 
a happy Europe would be a dull Europe to visit. If 
it were a good Europe return tickets only would 
be marketable. Let us placard our sentiment to see 
what it looks like. It is always gayer to do wrong 
knowingly than by chance. The best skating is on 
the thinnest ice. This may be an unflattering con- 
clusion to come to, that most of the places and 
purlieus which an induced artistic temperament 
praises, are full of horrors for the other fellow. A 
moment of amused reflection will admit its truth, 
however. 

The Place de la Nation in Paris is a large and 
well ventilated square, but it is not picturesque nor 
is it inhabited by people of frail susceptibilities. It 
is however a fair type of the roomy and wholesome 
towns the New Republicans dream of, with plenty 
of air, plenty of space and nothing for the senti- 
mental tourist to see. From the point of view of a 
"picturesque bit", our Chinatown, with its accom- 
modations for vice, dirt and pain, is much more fer- 
tile in suggestion than St. James Park. Let us 
frankly admit, those of us who pose, and who cock 
our heads wisely on one side and squint artistically 
at the universe at dawn or eve, complacently ad- 
mitting the composition good, let us admit, we say, 
that we like to have other people unhappy and at- 
a-distance sick in order to give us color thrills and 
touching compositions. We do so enjoy our own 
melting hearts. We are not likely to invite pic- 
turesque people to dine more than once, although 
they might make more profitable companions than 
the fragile souls of artistic temperament with their 
refinements of the intimate sensations. Senti- 
mental art appeals to our basest needs. It is the 
attar of roses which disguises the sewers of our pre- 
delictions. Sentimental art gives us the ballet 
dancer tipping a silk hat with her- toes and the 
"gambling of the cheat" in dark cellars, an adorable 
color scheme in putrid lights, reflections of our 
sensibility and our withdrawal. Whenever a pic- 
ture represents anybody's discomfort, whether a 
man's, a devil's, or a flea's, be sure that it is senti- 
mental and charming; the charm being made up 
of our shreds of character and the sins no one 
knows we have committed. Generous sentimental- 
ity is like a dry rain ; it does not exist. From the 
point of view of "an impression in water color", 
nothing is worth while but wretchedness. 



An exhibition of paintings by Martin J. Jackson 
opened last week at Steckel's gallery and will re- 
main open until the fifteenth of this month. There 
are twenty-one oils and ten water colors in the col- 
lection. They are aii landscapes, but of great va- 
riety of treatment. In some of these pictures Mr. 
Jackson seems to hold his brush firmly, while in 



Pacific Outlook 



23 



is to have the untrained fingers 
child. This is notably the case in the water colors, 
hi the upper row hang five pictures, if we remem- 
ber correctly. Four of tin ood, while 
fifth. "The Road to the Farm." is slight in concep- 
tion, fumhlinglv done and mechanical, quite ama- 
teurish, in fact. The pictures on the lower line are 
ig than those above. No. J<> is the 
subject as No. 2, called "Entrance to Santa 
Monica Canyon," the latter being done in oil. Beth 
of these aie unsatisfactory in light of Mr. Jacks 

r work. I'.ti; to return to his water colors. 
"Near the Lagoon" i- a particularly good piece of 
work, done in light washes. It has atmosphere and 
charm which cannot fail to appeal to anyone who 
is familiar with our coast. In this picture the artist 
has caught the •feeling of the sand and sea and of 
the struggling vegetation which knits the shining 
dunes together. Here he is at his best in aquarelle. 
Two other pictures of the same sort hang near, 
"Morning— Playa del Key." and. "At Playa de! 
Rev." They both are views of sea and shore and 
quite entitle Mr. Jackson to rank among- the paint- 
ers of serious intention. "Fickle Shadows" is a 
studv of pepper tree- which shows that he has great 
facility with his brush. 

A study of the oil paintings is a very profitable 
occupation, giving as it .Iocs the key to the enigma 
of Mr. Jackson's work. It will at once be noticed. 
that the artist has several manners, or rather sev- 
eral kinds of technique. He manipulates his brush 
quite differently on different canvases, giving a 
sense of confused personality, of several unseleeted 
goals. He adapts bis technique to his subject or 
to bis feeling of the moment. This is not a bad. 
thing when done tmderstandingly. As vet his 
choice of method is perhaps a little haphazard, 
guided probably more by sensibility than by pur- 
pose. The result is unceftainity and great un- 
evenness. His pictures group themselves by style. 
There are two of great clearness of atmosphere and 
done broadly — "Spring Memories" and "Ripples." 
The first of these is a brilliant bit of coloring and of 
untram/neled thought. It shows a sweep of slope- 
ing ground vivid with the new- life of early Sprino-. 
"Ripples," which is in no way bad, is more preoc- 
cupied, if one may say so. It would seem as if Mr. 
Tackson needed to be atone to do his best work and 
that his inspiration failed a little amid the chatter- 
ings of daily intercourse. "At Hennosa" is similar 
to the best of his water colors and has a hazy sheen 
over it which is unfortunately not incorporated 
thoroughly in the sky. "A Ray of Sunshine" is 
altogether a different sort of a picture, more pen- 
sive and a less defined brush work. The coloring- 
is exquisite and tentative and shows the artist's 
sensitiveness to his environment. It seems that 
he is somewhat fearful yet of his own power and 
only displayed his talent timidly. Yet No. 1 makes 
one feel that the force is there, only waiting the 
command of the will to emerge for strong work. 
One suspects that it will be commanded rather than 
coaxed into activity. 

"Mid-day" and '"The Sheltering Oak" are two 
studies of trees which expose another side of the 
talent of this man. Here he has confidence, which 
is not always the ease. His feeling for composition 
is not always as strong as his sense of color. 

"Breakwater — East San Pedro" is a common- 
place subject made interesting by the skill of tin 
treatment. "Autumn" is one of the most delightful 




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Pacific Outlook 



bits of color in the room. Mr. Jackson evidently 
does not know how well he can do. He is still a 
"little shy of the intimacies with which he might 
express. As a whole, this is a very creditable exhi- 
bition and one which anyone may view with pleas- 
• ure, both for what it is and also for what it prom- 
ises for the future. Mr. Jackson is a painter of un- 
doubted ability whose further development may be 
watched with interest. 



Plans for the new St. Thomas church, New York, 
have been completed. It is desired that the new 
edifice may be scientifically built, without any dis- 
guises. Some money could be saved, it is said, by 
using reinforced concrete. "But such a course", a 
circular to the members says, "would involve one 
of two alternatives — first, abandoning absolutely 
Gothic as a style, since Gothic is above all else hon- v 
est and scientific construction made beautiful by 
perfect proportion, and the evolving of a new 'steel 
and concrete art'; or, second, building a structural 
lie. Neither of these courses seemed justifiable, 
and the only thing left to do ^vas to provide for a 
building Gothic structurally as well as superficially, 
even though the cost was thus increased." This 
desire for honest art is the best possible thing. It 
is a question in a case like that of the Young Men's 
Christian Association in this city whether it would 
not have been more straightforward to have built 
the whole of the new building of the hideous red 
brick which is now used only in the alleys, where 
it is presumed no decent person will see the ugli- 
ness. A pretentious facade and an unsightly back 
seems architecturally to express the intimacies oi 
American feeling. If we look nice on the outside it 
does not matter, evidently, what the bath room 
knows. 



Art Briefs 

The Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences, 
which is building under the direction 1 of McKim 
Mead and White, is to be decorated by thirty sta- 
tues, the modeling of which is under the direction 
of Daniel C. French. He has the assistance of four- 
teen well known sculptors. Some of these models 
are already finished and are about to be cut in 
stone. This calling in of masters in other arts to 
aid in architectural decoration cannot fail to raise 
the character and quality of our public buildings, 
which is the best possible means to improve indi- 
vidual judgment and taste. 

About a fortnight ago an exhibition of British 
art was opened in Berlin. The Emperor William 
having evinced .an interest in it, forty masterpieces 
have been sent to the Prussian capital. Among 
them is the famous "Blue Boy" by Gainsborough, 
which heretofore the Duke of Westminister has al- 
ways refused to loan. J. P. Morgan has aiso sent 
some of his works of art. The pictures are said to 
be insured for $3,750,000 and are constantly 
guarded. 

William Wendt and Carl Oscar Borg have been 
exploring the neighborhod of Chatsworth Park in 
search of material for their sketches. 

Exhibitions next week: Steckel's Gallery, 336>j 
South Broadway: Martin J. Jackson, oil paintings. 

Norman St. Clair will show his pictures at the 
Woman's Club House February 18. 




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Pacific Outlook 



lb 




Former Estimate Confirmed 

's second recital, which took place at 
Simpson Audit irium Saturday afternoon, February 1, 
drew a good sized audience, and her performance con- 
firmed the reputation she won on her first appearance 
here and the statement which we then made, that she 
is one of the best pianists ever hoard in Los Angeles. 
The five pieces For harpsicord by Couperin, Handel 
ami Scarlatti were delightfully interpreted with just 
the simplicity and charm they demand, and Miss Verne 
scored with them a greater success than with the end- 
less and tedious Sonata by Brahms. Chopin's Waltz 
in G flat and the "Berceuse" .Miss Verne executed in 
the real spirit and remained true in the conception of 
them, to which it was a rare treat to listen, as espec- 
ially the "Berceuse" often has to suffer on account of 
a too-great intelligence on the part of this pianist's 
confreres, wh> desire to improve on Chopin. The 
Liszt numbers Miss Verne played in her usual style, 
with a great deal of dash and temperament. Most 
praiseworthy always is the interpretation of Miss 
Verne, as she preserves the real character, sentiment 
and spirit of the composers she renders. 

YERO. 



Campanari Joins Local Circle 

Campanari, whose name is known throughout the 
music world and who has been the musical director 
in Hammerstein's Manhattan Opera House, New 
York, is in Los Angeles. He came very quietly with 
his invalid wife for the benefit of whose health the 
Western trip was taken, and was in the city two weeks 
before the news of his presence became general. It 
means a great deal to the musicians of Los An- 
geles to have the celebrated violinist here. He will 
remain throughout the winter and will doubtless be 
heard in public a number of times before he returns 
to resume the work he left as director of the Hammer- 
stein orchestra. 

Through his brother, the famous opera singer, Cam- 
panari is connected with Tetraezini, the popular singer, 
she being a sister-in-law of the former. 

Friday evening Mr. and Mrs. Hancock Banning 
gave a musical and supper in his honor and also for 
Miss Alberta Denis, who recently returned from 
abroad. Miss Leila Holterhoff and Mrs. Mennion 
Robinson will contribute to the programme. 

To occupy himself while here .Campanari has ac- 
cepted the leadership of the Treble Qef Club. 



At Hotel Pepper 

Mrs. Maude Nichols Lyon, soprani. Mrs. Maria 
Thresher Webb, violinist, and Miss Blanche Brockle- 
bank, pianist, gave a very successful concert at Hotel 
Pepper Mondaj evening, February 3. The fashion- 
able audience which- greeted the artists was very en- 
thusiastic river their performances, and the musicians 



responded graciously to the demands for encores. 
Miss Brocklebank, the pianist of the trio, is yet un- 
known to the musical world of Los Angeles, which is 
to be rgretted, as she is a young musician with un- 
usual gifts. The four studies 1>\ Poldini for which 
she was down on the programme, gave her a most 
successful opportunity to display her sure and clean 
technique, her soft touch and good phrasing. Mosh 
kowski's Waltz in K major, her second number, she 
rendered with a brio full of color ami true sentiment. 
Mis-. Brocklebank has studied with Peje Storck for 
several years and under the training of this prominent 
pianist and musical pedagogue great things may be 
c>:] ected from her in the future. 

Mrs. Lyon tendered songs by not overly-famous, nor 
successful composers, such as Hallway Hopkinson, 
Margaret Lang, Clayton Jones, etc.. but they weie 
favorably received, by the audience. Mrs. Webb exe- 
cuted an adagio by Franz Ries and the Serenade by 
Drdla with a great deal of taste and with technical 
la illlessness. She added much to the success of I he 
recital. 



The Puccini Delight 

A notable musical visitation of the week was 
"Madam Butterfly," presented by one of the Savage 
English grand opera organizations. This is a work 
■which, both musically and dramatically, is really great, 
and the local production was an adequate one, in point 
of performers and stage settings. The orchestra made 
a particularly good showing, and formed a fine back- 
ground for the work of the singers — a combination 
unusual in grand opera prductions in Los Angeles. 
The five performances of this Puccini masterpiece, in 
which the principals alternated, were largely attended, 
and local fashion gathered in striking array at the 
Mason Monday night. The leadership of the two 
directors. Messrs. Rothwell and Dopper, served very 
materially in developing the best in the wonderful 
score of this strange and beautiful opera with a 
Japanese motif. 



Singers Entertained. 

The Gamut Club entertained the principals of 
the "Madam Butterfly" organization at its regular 
monthlv "spread" Wednesday evening. A]t 6:30 
the banquet room was opened and upward of 150 
guests took their seats. In honor of the special 
guests there was placed at each plate a souvenir 
fan containing half-tone pictures respectively of 
Dora de Fillippe, Rena Vivienne, Phoebe Strak- 
osche, and Miss Wolff, the four Madam Butterflies 
of the Savage opera company. Ernest L'rchs of 
Steinway & Sons and the Hruby brothers also were 
guests. Miss Behnee, Miss Fillippe and Mr. Stiles 
sang. During the past month eighty-three new 
members were admitted to the club. 



26 



Pacific Outlook 



The Planels 

The statement recently made in a musical journal 
that "M. and Mme. Planel, who are endorsed by 
,the French government in their work of propagat- 
ing French music literature, are now visiting the 
United States for a special mission — that of aiding 
an American branch to the French one for the aid 
of the many young American students who go to 
France to study," is taken with a good deal of salt 
by some local musicians, who are familiar with the 
monsieur and madame referred to and remember 



week at the Belasco for the first time in America, 
is quite delightful, as a whole, although it is doubt- 
ful whether the play is well sustained to the end. 
It is built up from the characters developed by 
Dickens in the book in which the Dorritts and their 
quaint associates appear, and the first two acts 
are abundantly Dickensish, the lives of those in- 
volved meandering placidly (it would seem) 
through the plot, yet always impressing the on- 
looker with a growing meaning, always, though 
slowly (as in real life) developing intimate identi- 



s> 



ft* 




s> 



fp 



Florence Stone, The Versatile, as a Rollicking Girl 



their "musical" performance in this city a year or 
so ago. Competent critics adjudged it frightful, 
at that time, and it is inferred that whatever "aid" 
they may plan to give American students in Paris 
will not be in the interests of the students, but will 
be in the interests and the aid of the Planels. These 
two players recently appeared in recital at the 
Waldorf-Astoria, in New York, in furtherance of 
their scheme. Some hold the opinion that they are 
musical mountebanks. 



"Mr. Forsby!" 

"Little Dorritt," which is being produced this 



ties ; constantly emitting subtle character sugges- 
tions. 

But in the third and last act we somehow lose 
our intimates of the earlier scenes — all except that 
masterful characterization, William Dorritt, pitiful, 
laughable, consummate — and withal actually lov- 
able — egotist. He alone moves with perfect suc- 
cess, with uninterrupted identity, from the first to 
the last curtain ; and it is eminently proper, of 
course, that this character should lead the way 
throughout, for the others are* made intentionally 
subsidiary to it. Yet with the sortie of the Dor- 
ritts from old Marshalsea prison ancMhe beginning 



Pacific Outlook 



27 



of their contrasting existence in the Fashionable 
world, the intimacy which we felt between our- 
- and the sweet, prison-born Amy ("Little 
Dorritt") and the generous-hearted, gallant lover 
from the outside world, Arthur Clennam, seems 
ehow tu receive a snub, a chilling; and with a 
full understanding thai this is just what the con- 
trasting act is framed to accomplish, we still main- 
tain that the desired result is not wrought out with 
that subtlety which would still leave that intimacy 
which we enjoyed, .-<> vital despite the shuck that it 
w.mld blossom "lit and warm our hearts again 
after the storv were done and the reaction which 
Comes "\er the audience after the fall of the last 
curtain — that measuring moment when the emo- 
tions, of whatever kinds, that have been poured 
into our hearts indiscriminately, first hot and then 
cold, and all from different quarters, rush together 
and find their normal level and average temperature 
— had registered the effect of the whole. In the 
reaction at the end of "Little Dorritt," as delight- 
ful a play as it is, we missed something from the 
finished effect ; when the impressions had flowed 
together and found their normal level, this level 
fell short of highwater mark. And this something, 
which, is lacking is the subtle character touch of 
Dickens, preserved consistently in the character of 
William Dorritt only. Amy's story is not well sus- 
tained in the finale; it seems to lag. 

George VV: I'.arnum develops the subtleties, the 
lights and shadows, the amusing pathos (if one 
may lie allowed this antithesis without suggesting 
bathos) of old Dorritt so carefully, so artistically 
that he makes a typical Dickens character, with all 
its eccentric delightfulncss, live before you as if it 
were not an impersonation, but an undeniable real- 
ity. Consistent throughout, Mr. Barnum in the 
part of the deluded old egotist whose unconquer- 
able self-esteem has kept his head in the clouds 
most of the time (not all the time, for occasionally 
there comes a bitter realization, and then the trag- 
edy is disclosed for a moment) during eighteen 
years of confinement in the debtors' prison at Mar- 
shalsea, unfolds the character with unerring judg- 
ment. He is master of the only intensely dramatic 
moment in the play when the dear child. Amy, in- 
forms her father, in the courtyard of the prison, 
that his ancestral estates have been restored to him 
through the efforts of the young Londoner, Clen- 
nam, formerly a gay rake, but converted by the 
sweet innocence of "Little Dorritt," whom he meets 
during a, chance visit to the prison, to earnest and 
self-sacrificing manhood. The gradual realization 
of what the child's words nvan, the awakening to 
the vital fact they impart, the almost killing elation 
that brings his old body from the chair like a shot, 
and the violent reaction, which relaxes it into the 
chair again, apparently lifeless for the moment, is 
a convincing conception of the opportunities of 
the moment. The little man's scene with Prince 
Henry Edward in the apartment in the hotel at 
Brighton (Dorritt being unaware of the august 
identity of his companion) is deliciously amusing. 
and at the same time is a facile bit of character 
development. The picture Mr. Barnum draws of 
the audacious way in which old Dorritt, armored 
in his own self-esteem, turns down his best friends 
and "butts" into the ranks of the select after his 
release, is unforgettable; and who that has heard 
it will not long remember the elegant old fraud's 
intermittent. "Mr. Forsby!" as the patrician nabob 



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28 



Pacific Outlook 



of the prison reprimands his lowliest courtier, the 
ragged, red-nosed, snarling Forsby, so well delin- 
eated by John Daly Murphy? 

Miss Emmet as "Little Dorritt" is successful to 
the fullest degree that this part allows. She plays 
the innocent, unselfish, prison^born child-woman 
with pretty sympathy. Florence Smythe assumes 
the part of the selfish sister, Fanny. 

Lewis Stone draws a dignified and agreeable pic- 
ture of Arthur Clennam, and the rest of the regular 
Belasco players make pleasant impressions in their 
various parts. Such a production as this is a severe 
test of any stock company. 

One of the charming episodes of the play is that 
in which the prison children come rushing into 
"Little Dorritt's" arms in the Dorritt family apart- 
ments and she sets them to work knitting while 
she teaches them to sing in chorus, "God Save the 
King," the while Clennam, infatuated by the inno- 
cence and novelty of the scene into which he has 
been unwittingly drawn, takes up the violin and 
plays the accompaniment for the little ones and 
their winsome teacher — plays on, forgetful, until 
the prison gates clang-to and confine him for the 
night. The stage planning, which is directed by 
Hobart Bosworth, is carefully done and effective 
throughout this production. 

"Little Dorritt" is adapted from the German of 
Franz von Schoenthan by Margaret Mayo. The 
original version has been produced with great suc- 
cess in Berlin and Vienna, although' the claim that 
it has been the "dramatic sensation of Europe for 
three years," hardly seems possible. 



In downright, Iet-'er-go-gallagher melodrama 
nothing is impossible except the possible. The 
thing is built to order to a given measure, and all 
corners are turned squarely without the least con- 
sideration either for art curves or plodding logic. 
There are certain designated high places to be hit 
— or, to change the figure a little, certain deliberate- 
ly built-up obstacles to be overcome, like the bar- 
riers of a golf course — and the swales in between 
are, to the melodramatist, only spaces to be skipped 
as precipitately as possible. Characters happen 
into scenes where they are urgently needed for the 
next development of the play, apparently without 
the least excuse for their presence, except the exi- 
gency named, and in a moment make themselves at 
home where they had never set foot before. They 
seem to have an unerring instinct for locality and 
for knowing the moment when they are most urg- 
ently, though inexcusably (from the standpoint of 
art) demanded. 

We have in mind Dick Ferris's current produc- 
tion of " 'Way Out West" at the Auditorium. Here 
is an example replete with those gallery-glorious 
moments when the unexpected begins to be ex- 
pected — and happens, just at the crucial moment, 
the twin brother or the lover or the girl with the 
secret — or perhaps a faithful Indian — having 
caught the scent of the approaching melodramatic 
crisis and overtaken it with seven-leagued boots. 

As a real old time "the-villain-is-'foiled-again" 
theatrical whirlwind, " 'Way Out West' is pretty 
successful. Dick Ferris had a hand in the construc- 
tion of the melodrama; and he has fitted the twin 
roles of Sam and Steve Grigsby, one a cowbo}' and 
the other a United States army officer, to his tal- 
ents very nicely. We would venture to suggest, 
however, that Dick, in the matter of make-up, lays 



on the agony a bit over-thickly in the matter of 
that shot-away shoulder. A smaller wound could 
be just as deadly, and less red paint on the shat- 
tered shirt would draw a more genuine sympathy 
from the on-looker. 

Miss Stone is completely charming in the in- 
genue role of Posey Parker, "the Little General," 
and the remarkable versatility of this actress is at- 
tested by her successful transition from the woeful 
Mary Magdalene of the week before to the saucy, 
rollicking, short-skirted and bewitchingly pretty 
little girl of the western prairie, who trips about 
among the tumultuous figures of "Way Out West." 

Joseph Kilgour appears in the impossible part of 
Parson Parker (really, this parson is pretty hard 
to swallow, even under stress of melodrama) ; Har- 
ry Von Meter is the villain with a vengeance — too 
much of a vengeance, at times, to be impressive — 
and Frank Beamish does the low comedy part of 
Ikey Iverstein with success. Eleanor Montell is 
the beautiful young woman with an affectionate but 
unmarried past in which Lieut. Carter, the villain, 
was the participant, and Florence Baker is artistic 
and careful, as usual, in the small part of Bright 
Light, the blind Indian maiden. 

Despite the sensational character of this produc- 
tion, we cannot pass over it without acknowledg- 
ing an admiration for the quiet, natural manner 
which characterizes Ferris on the stage. His art 
is largely lack of art ; he is always just plain, good- 
fellow Dick, as he is out in the lobby or on the 
street ; and as such he makes a genuine appeal to 
the sympathies of his audiences. 



The proof that "Fantana" at the Los Angeles 
this week is worth while is to say that Daphne 
Pollard has been gently romping through the 
"show" every night. This is as much as to say 
that the "show" has been romping through the 
other people who happen to be on the stage, for 
this little lady is the one real fascination of the 
Healy opera organization. We are not forgetting 
Teddy Webb, either, for surely he is a successful 
funster of the uproarious sort. He shows intelli- 
gent variety in his jokes, and has the knack of 
springing local "gags" in a most fetching manner. 
But there are lots of very funny clowns knocking 
around this broad land, while of dainty delights 
like this little Daphne there are very few. She is 




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29 



inal and interesting; we confess to a marked 
pleasure in watching her whimsical ways as she 
trips about among the figureheads (by contrast) 
behind the footlights. 

The pleasant-voiced Cunningham is absent from 
the cast this week, alth mgh he would have fitted 
well the part of the Commodore, which Fred Snook 
dues not till very snugly. George Kunkel is droll 
in his own queer way as Marquis Kioto. 

Besides \\ ebb. another new member is Amy 
Leicester, who takes the part of the Parisian vaude- 
ville "artist." Maude Beatty proves her versatility 
by singing the leading female part this week, fol- 
lowing a low comedy part last week. 

This week is advertised as the last of the local 
engagement of the San Francisco < )pera Company 
which, during its several weeks' stay at the Los 
Angeles, has attracted a substantial patronage. 
From a musical standpoint the organization is be- 
low standard, but personally the members of the 
company have won many admirers. 

The interior of the Los Angeles has recently 
been improved in comfort, and offers a verv at- 
tractive gathering place for playgoers. L. B. 



Caustic Criticism 

Here is a paragraph taken from the New York 
Dramatic News's review of a play recently pro- 
duced in the metropolis, called "A Fighting 
Chance." From these lines it is evident that caus- 
tic criticism is not confined to the lay press, which 
is often charged with possessing an undue desire 
to "roast" plays and players, but is also to be met 
with in the columns of professional publications 
which are naturally flattering to theatrical produc- 
tions whenever possible. Here is the summing-up 
of "A Fighting Chance" : 

"It is just possible that this 'comedy drama' was 
not written with a mop. The probability is that 
it was gathered in a junk shop, situated between a 
neck and the crown of a derby hat; size, 6^4. Often 
popular price plays are so bad that they are good, 
but the title of this scrap heap, taken from Robert 
Chambers' novel, is about the only good thing in 
it. It is a pleasure to praise and a regret to con- 
demn, but a reporter of plays owes a duty to his 
paper and readers, as well as to managers, authors 
and actors. If we are to have better plays we must 
tell the truth about the poor ones before us, and 
the truth should be tempered with mercy only 
when the writers are not callous and indifferent to 
decency. More than half the number of charac- 
ters in this Hungarian goulash are crooks, thieves, 
murderers or would-bes. 'Leah Kleschna' inspired 
it. But, oh, the difference!" 



Theater Items 

"Under the Polar Star," which Dick Ferris will 
offer at the Auditorium the week of February 10, 
is an English melodrama, in which W. H. Thomp- 
son, the veteran actor, made a big hit in New York 
last season. This is its first appearance outside of 
that production, and its first time anywhere in 
stock. The story starts in an English drawing 
room, but is rapidly transferred to the land of ice 
and snow and from then on its locale is in tlie 
frozen north. Incident to the action, which con- 
cerns the attempt to discover the north pole, there 
is much intrigue and many hair-breadth escapes 
are brought about by the superior cleverness of 
those who arc in the right. In the end, of course. 



the pole is found, and all the intense sufferings and 
mental anguish end in happiness to everyone ex- 
cept the villains, < Ine scene shows the ship ice 

bound in the far north, in the six months night, 
with only the Polar Star to cheer the weary watch- 
ers. Another shows the cam]) on the ice, with food 
restricted to what may be obtained by hunting, 
and the attempts of the ice-bound travelers to keep 
up their spirits. 

The Belasco company will lie seen in "The En- 
ergetic Mr. West" during the coming week. 

The Burbank, which was to have produced 
"Home Folks" during the present week, Geld over 
the success, "Are You a Mason?" and will put 
"Home Folks" on next week. 

Eleanor Montell of the Ferris company is to go 
to San Diego soon to play leading roles at the Isis 
theater. 

"Graustark," the play which Dick Ferris and 
Miss Stone have made familiar to Los Angeles, 
was produced in New York for the first time Jan- 
uary 24, at the Harlem Opera House. 

In a play called "A Child Shall Lead Them," now 
being presented in New York, the star is a twelve- 
year-old girl named Bell Jeannette. 

It is interesting to note that the distinctly Amer- 
ican play, "The Squaw Man," dealing with Indian 
and white life on the western desert, has found 
great favor in London. George Fawcett is appear- 
ing there in the title role, and the English critics 
pronounce him one of the best character actors 
who ever crossed the Atlantic. 

"A Waltz Dream," "The Soul Kiss" and "The 
Merry Widow," are the names of three theatrical 
productions now running in New York. This com- 
bination ought to furnish sentiment enough to sen- 
timentalize the whole town. 

Maude Adams is sitting for the artist, John H. 
Alexander, who has begun the preliminary sketches 
of what will undoubtedly be the most ambitious 
oil portrait ever made of Maude Adams. The por- 
trait is to be in six colors, of full length dimensions 
and in the costume which she will wear in the sec- 
ond act of "The Jesters." Mr. Alexander is best 
known for his mural paintings in the new Carnegie 
Library of Pittsburg and for his earlier portrait of 
Maude Adams as L'Aiglon. 

Edith Lemmert, who is playing the part of Mrs. 
Henry in "The Virginian," is a native of Califor- 
nia, hailing from Los Angeles, where she has a 
ranch. Her father and little daughter, Leadith 
Hanley, live on the ranch, and Miss Lemmert 
spends her Summers there. She is the widow of 
the distinguished actor, Lawrence Hanley, whose 
death occurred in Los Angeles a few years ago. 

Signor Giacomo Puccini, composer of the Jap- 
anese grand opera, "Madam Butterfly," which 
Henry W. Savage is presenting on tour, has com- 
pleted the score of "La Fanciulla del West," mean- 
ing in English, "The Girl of the Golden West," a 
name made famous by David Belasco's drama of 
early gold-seeking days in California. Signor Car- 
los Zangarini, the well-known Italian poet, wrote 
the libretto, which is divided into two acts, the first 
adhering closely to Mr. Belasco's play ; the second 
departing somewhat from the original. 



Carreno 

The coming of Carreno is the next event of pro- 
fessional musical interest. She will be heard at 
Simpson Auditorium February 22 and 28. March 



30 



Pacific Outlook 



3 comes the great pianist, Ignace Paderewski, for 
one concert only, to be given at the Shrine Temple, 
where the large seating capacity will admit of pop- 
ular priced seats. Paderewski will be followed by 
Fritz Kreisler, violinist, "the virtuoso with the 
singing tone'." Immediately following these instru- 
mentalists comes the dainty lyric soprano, Lillia 
Blauvelt. 

Jokes Guaranteed. 

The Ferris Indoor Circus seems to have struck 
a popular chord, and it has proved what the man- 
agement terms a "go." New acts have been added 
and the order of entrances has been revised to show 
all the "turns" to best advantage. Among the new 
features are the Ahrens, sensational equilibrists. 
The trained elephants remain the star act of each 
performance. Every joke sprung by the clowns 
is guaranteed to have been ancient when Noah 
gave that first circus. 



University Course. 

L. E. Belly mer states that the University Course 
will be opened February 18 at Simpson Auditorium 
by Prof. Lutoslawski of the University of Cracow, 
Poland, who will lecture on "The Polish Nation." 
One week later he will lecture on "The Russian 
Crisis, and What Has Brought it About." The 
third subject which he is to discuss is "The Immi- 
nent and Inevitable European War." Other lec- 
tures will be Dr. Thomas E. Green, B. R. Baum- 
gardt and Captain Richmond P. Hobson, who will 
compare our navy with the navies of foreign 
powers. 

* * * 

Literary Notes 

By Perez Field 

A movement is afoot in New York City for the 
establishment of a society which shall advocate the 
principles and adopt the methods, so far as they 
are applicable to America, characteristic of .the 
Fabian Society in England. The Fabian Society 
has been a center of initiative and of controversy 
in modern political theory for a number of years. 
Among its members are such writers as H. G. 
Wells, Stanton Coit, Annie Besant and Berfiaru 
Shaw. Their meetings are held in Essex Hall in 
London. Addresses are made to the members, after 
which diverse questioning and comment take 
place. Recently the Fabians have listened to a ser- 
ies of talks on "The Faith that I Hold" by different 
men, among 'whom was Dr. R. J. Campbell of the 
City Temple, who has recently published a book 
called "Christianity and its Social Order." All 
opinions are tolerated and most of the criticisms of 
the speakers seem to be given without any ani- 
mosity. The society seems to be very well con- 
ducted, and this attempt to form a similar organiza- 
tion in this country ought to be successful if the 
right sort of persons can be induced to give their 
time to it. One reproach under which the social- 
istic movement has labored in America is the ap- 
parent lack of leaders of ability — men who have 
the public esteem both for their character and intelli" 
gence. We are told that Jack London signs him- 
self "Yours for the Revolution." This is more 
picturesque than thoughtful and it is to be hoped 
that this new society will not embody such a spirit. 
The provisional basis of the Society of Practical 
Socialists is as follows: 



1. The aim of the Society of Practical Socialists 
is to replace the present industrial chaos by a co- 
operative commonwealth in which shall prevail the 
widest attainable distribution of wealth. 

2. It proposes to work towards this end by edu- 
cational propaganda and by framing and support- 
ing social and political measures which, step by 
step, advance to its goal. 

3. It recognizes that the development of trusts 
is both inevitable and desirable since competition, 
on account of its wastefulness, must necessarily 
pass into monopoly; and that private monopoly 
must in turn five place, for the protection of so- 
ciety, to public monopoly. This does not imply the 
abolition of private property, but only the substi- 
tution of public for private ownership and control 
in monopolistic industries. 

4. It defines socialism as follows : Socialism 
consists in the public ownership under democratic 
control of all monopolistic sources of wealth. 

5. To attain its goal, it appeals to the whole de- 
mocracy. 

Further information in regard to the society may 
be had from John Martin, Grymes Hill, Stapleton, 
Staten Island, N. Y. Mr. Martin was a member of 
the executive committee of the London Fabian So- 
ciety from 1894 to 1899. 



John Graham Brooks made an address at the 
Hudson Theater last week and is quoted by the 
New York Tribune as saying: 

"All through the ages we have been putting the 
poor little devils in jail, but the great creative 
criminals, those who use the smaller ones as their 
puppets, go scot free. They are the great dinner 
givers. They are the collectors of art — they all 
collect art. They are our friends, and as a great 
lawyer said when I asked him why some of these 
great lawbreakers were not made to suffer the pen- 
alty of the law, 'We can't put our friends in prison.' 

"That is the root of the whole matter," the lec- 
turer continued. "It is the man we don't know 
that we send to jail. He is our enemy because we 
don't know him. But the man who belongs to our 
own set we will stand by and fight for and defend 
every time. 

"It is the same instinct that makes the labor 
unions stand by their crooks, but I believe when 
we begin to attack the capitalistic crooks the best 
element in the labor unions will turn on the crooks 
in their ranks and deliver themselves from the body 
of this death. They are eager to get rid of these 
people, who do more harm to the unions than they 
do to any r one else, but they say 'As long as the 
great crooks go free we will stand by ours.' " 

Mr. Brooks was talking of the cause of human 
hatreds, and had said that human beings have a 
natural feeling of enmity toward those who are 
different from themselves, even if the difference is 
only a matter of hair and trousers. The lecturer 
remarked that we all had an "idiotic area" and 
that it should be the particular study of each indi- 
vidual to discover this region and reduce it as 
much as might be. In this idiotic area Mr. Brooks 
found the cause of many human enmities. The 
other cause is an economic one. When two dogs 
want a bone and there is only one bone to be had 
shortness of temper on the part of the dogs is the 
natural result. 



Ang...,,. cufomi. WHO WOULD DEFEND LOS ANGELES? 



February 15. 190S 



A 




^jyiiik 




OFFICE OF THE 

MAYOR 

CITY OF LOS ANGELES 
CALIFORNIA 

A.C. Harper, mavor 




HERBERT D. KENNEDY 



It was the understanding that Mr Anderson preferred to 
go on the speoi 1 aqueduct commission , but if it is not his wish 
If have no desire to put him there. 

If he wants to stay on the Board of Public Works I will 
name another man for the commission and reappoint him to the Board 
of Publi Works. 



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PAMEJB (©lUlKliDDIl 



George Baker Anderson 

EDITOR AND CCNCniL MANAGER 



Ji Southwestern Weekly 

Lanier Bartleit 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR 



Howard Clark Gallou, 

SECRETARY-TREASURER 



Published every Saturday at M,S'3ia.32o Lissner Build ns. 
Lot Jtngeles, California, by the 

Pacific Outlook Company. 

Subscription price S2.00 a year In advance. Single copy IO 
cents on all news stands. 

Entered as second-class matter April t, to;-, at the postorlice at Los Angeles, 
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Vol. 4. Los Jtngeles. Cat., February 15, I90S Mo. 7 

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COMMENT 

IF ONE THING more than any other gave 
William M. Tweed his strength as a machine 
politician it was his practice of keeping his prom- 
ises. Tweed never gave his word unless he believed 
it to be absolutely necessary, but once given it has 
been said that it never was broken. It was this 
faculty of keeping promises which gave Richard 
Croker his power. The same ma)' be said of 
Matthew S. Quay, for years the Republican "boss" 
of Pennsylvania. No man in public life, no quasi- 
public man, has retained power long after it became 
known that his pledges would not be kept. While 

this is particularly true of "leaders" 

One Secret and "bosses", it is also true of 

of Power officials who have been elected to 

public offices of trust. In order to 
retain the confidence of the people a public official 
must make good definite pledges to do certain 
things, unless there arises some obstacle to the 
keeping of such promise. If an official clothed with 
appointive power promises to make a certain ap- 
pointment and subsequently changes his mind for 
good and sufficient reasons, public confidence in 
him inevitably will decline unless his change of 
mind be accompanied by an explanation of the 
causes leadinsr thereto. These general propositions 
are peculiarly applicable to a situation wh.ich 
has arisen in Los Angeles. 

ABOUT FIVE WEEKS AGO the Examiner 
published an interview with Mayor Harper in which 
the latter is reported as having stated that he would 
not reappoint James A. Anderson to the Board of 
Public Works. On the same day the Mayor signed 
a letter adroitly addressed to nobody in particular 
in which he promised that lie would reappoint Mr. 
Anderson to this office, if the latter desired to 



continue to serve. This letter, so far as is known, 
i*. tile only signed promise made by the Mayor. 

But mi at least one other occasion Mayor Harper 
definitely promised that he would continue Mr. 
Anderson in office. In a letter written to Harley 
W. Brundige, managing editor of the Express, '>y 

William IX Stephens, J. 0. Koepfli, 

A "Positive J. M. Schneider and Eugene Ger- 

Promise " main, representing a committee of 

the Chamber of Commerce, the 
Municipal League, the Merchants and Manufac- 
turers' Association and the Los Angeles Bar Asso- 
ciation, these gentlemen state that they "called by 
appointment on the mayor, and informed him that 
Mr. Anderson had expressed his willingness to 
accept the place if offered to him." The letter 
continues: "The mayor thereupon expressed his 
high regard for Mr. Anderson as a man and as a 
public servant, and stated in unequivocal terms that 
he had told Mr. Germain that he would appoint Mr. 
Anderson. The committee had not asked for the 
appointment, but we accepted the mayor's state- 
ment of his intention without question as a positive 
promise, and have so regarded it ever since." 

* * * 

A PROMISE by word of mouth is more easily 
broken than one made in writing and signed. While 
it is possible that the mayor may contend there was 
nothing very definite about his pledge to Mr. Ger- 
main and the other members of the committee who 
called upon him, his word standing alone against 
those of these four gentlemen, we hardly believe 
that he will dare to deny the authenticity of the 
letter which is reproduced on the front cover of 
the Pacific Outlook this week. It is unequivocal 
in tone, equally so with his verbal statement made 

to Mr. Germain and reiterated 

Sacred Pledges before the other members of 

Ignored the committee. That he did 

pledge himself to reappoint Mr. 
Anderson if the latter would accept the office in 
one instance, and in the other stated unqualifiedly 
that he would do so. there is no doubt whatever. 
Twice, at least, he gave his word to name Mr. 
Anderson. Monday he named General Adna R. 
Chaffee, ignoring his sacred pledges. If, in such 
a grave matter as this, Mayor Harper will wantonly 
break his word, giving out no explanation as to the 
motives that impelled him to do so, the inference 
naturally is that he regards a promise of this kind, 
wdiether verbal or written, as of little moment com- 
pared with the finesse possible in the game of 
politics which practically the wdiole city now be- 
lieves him to be playing. 

* * * 

WE BELIEVE that Mayor Harper has made a 
monstrous mistake — that he has committed a g'-a'-e 
tactical error — that he will live to regret in a super- 
lative degree the monumental folly which, in the 
opinion of this paper, has characterized his defiance 



Pacific Outlook 



of public sentiment in this matter. It is true that 
in naming General Chaffee he has performed a 
political coup which doubtless has discouraged all 
talk of the recall for the time being, for the ap- 
pointee is a man of unquestioned integrity, one 
whom the whole people delight to honor. This, 
however, has nothing to do with the case. The 
important thing is that Los Angeles has for its mayor 

a man to whom a definite 

What Must pledge relative to a vital 

These Men Think? matter is as chaff. The 

point that should be driven 
home is that our chief executive's word is a thing 
to be taken lightly. It makes no difference whether 
General Chaffee is the enual, the superior or the 
inferior of Mr. Anderson. Mayor Harper sacredly 
promised t reappoint Mr. Anderson — promised at 
least once verbally and once in writing. He broke 
his word. What must have been the thoughts of 
the gentlemen who called upon the mayor and re- 
ceived assurances to the effect that he would name 
Mr. Anderson when, on the very day that they 
wrote "We make no question now that it is the 
purpose of Mayor Harper to carr)' out his promise 
to Mr. Germain and the rest of us," they learned that 
at that moment the mayor's secretary probably was 
preparing the brief but fateful message which, in 
effect, kicked James A. Anderson off the Board of 
Public Works? 

* * * 

SOME OF THE INCIDENTS connected with 
the councilmanic act of confirming the mayor's ap- 
pointment of General Chaffee would have been 
farcical if the matter had not been of so serious ?, 
character. In demanding the confirmation Council- 
man Heafy pathetically pleaded that it. was the duty 
of that body to "take care" of his former military 
commander. His patronizing air and tone gave 
way when a laugh went around the council chamber 
at the bad "break" made by this local statesman — 
and he explained that when he said he wanted tq 
"take care" of the distinguished soldier he meant 
something different. Another highly edifying situ- 
ation was found in the attitude 

Situations of Councilman Dromgold, who 

Grave and Gay entered the plea that it was the 
"duty" of the council to con- 
firm the mayor's appointments unless his honor 
should offer the name of some man whose standing 
was not up to the mark. Mr. Dromgold, who was 
selected for his position by the food government 
forces, has proven a distinct disappointment to 
those responsible for his nomination and election. 
The fact that the applause which followed the an- 
nouncement of the vote was started in an ostenta- 
tious manner by the representative of the Times 
may be taken as an indication that that paper 
regards the ousting of Mr. Anderson as a personal 
victory. And, furthermore, the Times will now be 
saved the trouble of springing that story which i: 
has had "up its sleeve" for some time past. The 
Pacific Outlook has the same story. Its details are 
too nasty to print — at least that is our present view. 

* * * 

WHOEVER CONTROLS the party in power 
controls the government. It is not likely that any- 
body will deny this truth. The Southern Pacific 
politicians in California have admitted that they 
control the party in power in this state. They 



whine that, they have been "forced" into interfer- 
ing in state and municipal politics in California 
for the protection of the interests of the railroad 
corporation. This being admitted, popular govern- 
ment, exists no more. Strangely enough the very 
papers which are defending the railroads are rais- 
ing perennial howls that this is a democracy, that 
the people rule and will rule. In the 
Who same breath the people are damned 

Controls? for daring to interfere with the condi- 
tions that have prevailed in this state 
for a quarter of a century. The inconsistency of 
the attitude of such papers as these is too glaring 
to require comment. The railroads and the people 
surely cannot control at the same time, ff the 
railroads have the power the people certainly have 
not. If the people secure control of state govern- 
ment the railroads will no longer control. This 
sounds trite and commonplace, but the truth can- 
not be told too frequently. Every voter who re- 
frains from entering the fight against railroad dom- 
ination fixes his status as an enemy of popular 
government. 

* * * 

SINCE THE ADOPTION of the constitution of 
1879 not one concerted effort on the part of the 
honest Republican voters of California to liberate 
their party and the state from the domination of 
the Southern Pacific railroad was made until last 
summer, when the Lincoln-Roosevelt League of 
Republican Clubs was organized in Oakland. For 
more than a generation the Republican party in this 
state has permitted itself to be the tool, the play- 
thing, of the railroad, a reproach and a by-word on 
the tongues of the rest of the nation. It has sunk 
to the lowest depths of infamy. Thousands upon 
thousands of the "best citizens" of the state — moral, 
cowards, selfish business men, fearful of the heavy- 
hand of the oppressor, every one of them; men. who 
have not taken the field against the common enemy 
because of the prevailing apprehension of punish- 
ment sure to follow in the event of 
The Shame the exhibition of a spirit of rebellion 
of It! against the monstrous iniquity 

which has overwhelmed the state — 
voted like Dudley's notorious "blocks of five" for 
the nominees of the machine. With the power in 
their hands to wipe the machine off the earth by 
taking the initiative at the primaries, they have 
proven their spinelessness by applauding the pro- 
gramme of the machine, even when that pro- 
gramme has been such an infamy as the action of 
the notorious Santa Cruz convention of 1906. Not 
only have they feared the hand of William F. Her- 
rin, but, miserable weaklings that many of them 
have shown themselves to be, they have stood in 
mortal terror of the venal press, of which there is a 
most conspicuous example in this city. And — 
shame upon them — there are many otherwise good 
men in Los Angeles who at this moment dare not 
take the field against their common foe for fear 
that this newspaper — the Los Angeles Times — 
will "do them dirt", as it has been expressed in vul- 
gar though expressive language. The shame of it! 

* * * 

THE FORCES at work to break the shackles 
which have held California in political bondage for 
so long have been, bitterly assailed by some of the 
newspapers which have become notorious for their 



Pacific Outlook 



defense of rich criminals. The local paper to which 
reference has been made has gone further in this 
direction than any of its companions. It lias lost 
no opportunity to fling its characteristic 

taunts in the direction of the Lincoln-Roosevelt or- 
ganization. Though it knows that many of the 
most conscientious, high-minded ami brilliant men 
in the state have identified themselves with this 
movement for the restoration to the people of the 
rights which are guaranteed to them by the organic 
law of the land, it greets them with jibes and jeers, 
with spiteful and devilish taunt, with malediction. 

It argues by "calling names". It ap- 

Teeth of plies the terms of "renegade", "social- 

a "Puppet" ist" and "mischief-maker" to men 

like William J. Ilunsaker. Sidnej A. 
Butler, Lee C. Gates, George Alexander, Stoddard 
less. Judge Waldo M. York. Marshall Stimson and 
others of the same high tone. These men. accord- 
ing to this authority, "are over-estimating their 
ab'.'i! i ption." Stoddard Jess cor- 

rupt? George Alexander corrupt? Any of these 
men corrupt ? What, in the name of heaven, has 
anv decent citizen of California to fear from a paper 
which descends to such coarse abuse of men of this 
stamp? What influence can such a paper possibly 
have upon men of average intelligence? Why 
should any man flinch or quail before the puny 
whip of this irresponsible libeller? Why should 
any man hesitate to work hand in hand with a body 
like the Lincoln-Roosevelt League because of air- 
fear that he. too. may become a victim of the snap- 
ping teeth of this 'puppet", as President Roosevelt 
has aptly characterized it? 

* * * 

IT REMAINS for men of the so-called "better" 
class, largely, to say whether, under the wornout 
Spur of the Times and the sadly frayed lash of Her- 
rin, they will stand for decency in politics, for popu- 
lar government rather than for a continuation of 
railroad control over their affairs, or seek cover 
from the outpourings of the wrath of the senile and 
decadent organ of the grafters and the railroad. 
We say the so-called "better" class, because the 
masses in the Republican party have already lined 
up with the opposition to political skulduggery. 

The success of the present movement for the libera- 
tion of the state from the master, 

Which is the Harriman, represented by Her- 
"Better Class"? rin and his equally corrupt lieu- 
tenants, will not be due to the 
"leading citizens" who are holding back for fear 
of punishment at the hands of the machine or its 
newspaper organs; it will be due to the "nonenti- 
ties" in politics and business by whom a slap in the 
face is regarded in the light of an invitation to fight. 
And there will be plenty of fight — of this we may 
be sure. But is it not the source of some humilia- 
tion, you of the so-called spineless "better" class. 
that your moral cowardice prompts you to lie down 
in the harness while the little fellows who "do noi 
count" — in business and politics — do your fighting 
for you? They fight; you jump to the front about 
the "time the rewards are ready to be passed around. 
They do the work ; you receive the giant share of 
the profits. 

* * * 

A DEPUTY attorney-general of the state is re- 
ported by a San Francisco correspondent of the 
Los Angeles Herald to have discovered evidence of 



4,000 cases of rebating on the books oi the South- 
ern Pacific Compaii) in that city. As the constitu- 
tion provides a maximum penalty- of $20,000 For 
each offense, the total line assessable against the 

company, should its guilt be proven, would aggre- 
gate SNO.000,000. Of course nobody expects an) 

California court to impose such a fine as this upon 
the Southern Pacific. Worse than this, it is a ques- 
tion if the railroad can be 'convicted for these of- 
fenses. The railroad will probably make the plea 

that the constitution is not self-acting. 
The Arch and that in the absence of a statute 
Criminal governing the case no conviction can 

be secured. Of the guilt of the com- 
pany there appears to be no reasonable doubt. In 
fact, officers of the company have already admitted 
having granted rebates in a large number of cases. 
When this admission was made before Interstate 
Commerce Commissioner Franklin K. Lane the 
company's representatives knew that the federal 
government could not punish it for its flagrant vio- 
lations of the state law, and they believed the com- 
pany and its agents to be safe from prosecution by 
state authorities. Such eminent attorneys as Thom- 
as E. Gibbon, Judge John D. W T orks, Joseph H. Call 
and Judge D. K. Trask have declared that the or- 
ganic law covered the case. What the courts of 
California will say may be another matter. 

* * * 

LET US SUPPOSE that in the trial court the 
company be found guilty and a heavy fine imposed, 
and that the Supreme Court determine that the 
company or its representatives cannot be convicted 
except in pursuance of a . statutory law. What • 
then? Legislative enactment along the lines pro- 
vided for by the Constitution. Of course such a 
desideratum would be impossible of attainment with 
the legislature constituted as at present — but the 
legislature is not to remain under the control of the 
Southern Pacific railroad forever. There is little 
doubt that at the election next fall a majority of 
members will go to Sacramento under 
Sitting definite pledge to the Lincoln-Roosevelt 
Tight Republican League to enact laws in ac- 
cordance with the constitutional mandate. 
With an honest legislature, an honest governor and 
courts in which the people have confidence, there 
is no doubt that the Southern Pacific will be ade- 
quately punished for any infractions of the law 
which have not been outlawed by the statute of 
limitation. Day by day the sentiment in favor of 
drastic action against the offending railroad and 
its political bureau is growing stronger ; day by 
day recruits are being enrolled by the Lincoln- 
Roosevelt clubs in every part of the state. A bet- 
ter day is dawning for California. The Southern 
Pacific may sit tight with smug countenance just 
now, but the people are about to have their innings. 

* * * 

WILLIAM F. HERRIN is cheap at $80,000 per 

year. This is the salary which Harriman is said 
to pay his chief lieutenant in California. The fig- 
ures look big. but they are as almost nothing when 
compared with the tremendous pecuniary bene- 
fits derived by the Harriman system from the main- 
tenance of its political bureau. During the past 
vear. for example, the railroad collected about a 
million dollars from merchants in San Francisco 
on account of illegal local switching charges. How 
much it collected from the merchants of Los An- 



Pacific Ou t I o o k 



geles has not yet been made pubHc. It would be 
highly edifying to ascertain the approximate 

amount. It probably would be 

Machiavellian found to fall not far below half 

Taskmaster that amount. What is $80,000 out 

of a million? Herrin would be a 
cheap man at half a million annually ; for without 
him or some man capable of maintaining a vise- 
like grip upon the state, all this infamous income 
would vanish. It pays to be "in politics", especial- 
ly in the sort of politics which has made the name 
of Herrin a hooting - and a malediction on the 
tongues of honest men. Do you wonder why it is 
that Herrin, a Democrat, is making such a desper- 
ate fight to "make good" as the head taskmaster of 
the dominant party in this state? Do vou wonder? 
Do you still relish the idea of supporting the can- 
didates named by this machiavellian boss, of lick- 
ing the boot of the man who heads the brigands of 
the Southern Pacific? Do you? 

* * * 

"WE HAVE no patience with lady-like reform- 
ing", announces Chester H. Rowell, editor of the 
Fresno Republican and one of the most active 
workers in behalf of the success of the Lincoln- 
Roosevelt League movement for the liberation of 
the state of California from the tyrannical heel of 
the Southern Pacific despot. "We have no patience 
with lady-like reforming" should be the slogan of 
the entire body of independent voters who believe 
that a Democratic boss has controlled the policies 
of the Republican party in the state long enough. 
"We have no patience with lady-like reforming" 
certainly is a good motto for every independent, 
courageous, stiff-backed paper — and the Pacific 

Outlook hereby adopts it. The "lady- 
Lady-like like" reformers, we presume, are 
Reforming" those who loll back while the Roose- 

velts, the Heneys, the Folkses and 
the Chamberlains are digging at the roots of poli- 
tical infamy that they shall no longer entangle the 
feet of "business". And this very same "business" 
is but another name for the "lady-like reformers." 
"A doctrinaire in the White House politely depre- 
cating unlawful practices", adds Mr. Rowell, 
"would be applauded even by the men he was hit- 
ting." Surely ; and the doctrinaires who let the 
"anarchists" and "socialists" and "renegades" do 
their fighting for them — the fighting which is im- 
possible to moral cowards and men who fear thaL 
"business" will be hurt. — are taking what pleasure 
they can out of the hollow plaudits of the machine 
— applause offered to them because of their supine- 
ness. Let us have no further patience with "lady- 
like reforming". 

* * * 

DEFIANCE fairly flung into the teeth of the 
reactionaries — such was the recent message of 
President Roosevelt to Congress. "Too much 
Roosevelt," they had begun to chirp feebly. It was 
their hope that the chorus would swell in resistless 
volume froms hore to shore. The President has re- 
plied. It was as the shrill shriek of the American 
eagle as compared with the feeble chirp of a sick 
canary. "Too much Roosevelt," such of the Presi- 
dential candidates as seemed primarily determined 

to prevent the nomination of Wil- 

The Cat Out Ham H. Taft had begun to say. 

of the Bag They hoped that there might be a 

popular response. They hoped to 
put Taft out of the running. After that they would 
fight it out among themselves. A friend of one of 



the candidates inadvertently allowed the feline to 
escape from the bag the other day. "Leaders of the 
party," he said, without naming them, "are of the 
opinion that Taft, if nominated, could not be 
elected. They mean no personal disrespect to the 
war secretary ; their hostility is to the Roosevelt 
policies which he reflects, advocates, and cham- 
pions. The public is tiring, if not tired, of Roose- 
veltism ; the public wants a conservative candidate 
for the presidency." 

* * * 

THAT GREAT and good friend of the cause of 
temperance, the Rev. Ervin S. Chapman, otherwise 
the Anti-Saloon League, has turned a neat trick 
against the local Prohibitionists. A few days ago 
all the temperance organizations of the city were 
apparently ready to co-operate in a harmonious, 
united, federated movement to wipe out the entire 
liquor traffic from Los Angeles. But they forgot 
to reckon with Dr. Chapman and the Anti-Saloon 
League, which is supposed by some to be a buffer 

between the Prohibition party and the 

"Booze" liquor interests. The campaign planned, 

Scores • and which might have been successful if 

carried out along the lines at first laid 
down, will not be made. "Booze" has scored once 
more. The liquor traffic is destroying a resident 
of this city every working day in the year, and for 
the next two years at least it will continue to do 
so without let or hindrance. Together with its in- 
famous companion, the house of prostitution, so 
openly tolerated by the city authorities, it is de- 
stroying scores of girls. A recognized enemy, 
which might have been annihilated by united effort, 
it has obtained a new lease of life; and whether the 
Anti-Saloon League is responsible for it or not 
we leave intelligent men and women to judge for 
themselves. 

* * * 

LET US GO BACK three years. At that time 
the local Prohibitionists decided that conditions 
were then ripe for a united movement against the 
entire liquor traffic. They desired to plan their 
movement secretly. In their communications with 
the other temperance organizations inviting their 
co-operation they expressly requested that the mat- 
ter be considered confidential. Imagine their amaze- 
ment therefore when, a few days later, a morning 
paper announced under glaring headlines that Dr. 
Chapman had stated in a lecture in Pasadena the 

day before that "the Anti-Saloon League 
A Bit of was to begin a campaign against the sa- 
History loons of Los Angeles at once." While the 

league had a right to begin a campaign 
of this sort whenever it pleased, the announcement 
of its executive head was regarded among the tem- 
perance people not identified with the league as a 
betrayal of the confidence which had been reposed 
in Dr. Chapman, and as having been entered into for 
exactly the same purpose as was the announcement 
made in last Friday's Express of the intention of 
the league to bring on an election twenty-two 
months hence, namely, to demoralize, dismay and 
discourage the other organizations and to 'prevent 
them from going ahead with such a federated move- 
ment as had been proposed. 

* * * 

THE RESULT of this apparently treacherous act 
of three years ago was an outburst of indignation and 
condemnation in private and in print. It was fol- 



Pacific Outlook 



I 



lowed b) the appointn i ommittce represent- 

ing the Prohibition party, the Woman's Christian 
Temperance I "nt< >n and the < iood Templars to confer 
with the Anti-Saloon I These committee! 

licld several meetings in which the former commit- 
tee argued in favor of an immediate movement to de 
stroy i lie entire liquor business; the latter committee 
argued for a campaign against the saloons alone. The 
first-named committee called attention to the inevit- 
able result of such an effort- its certain defeat by an 
overwhelming majority because it could not com- 
mand the hearty or enthusiastic support of the tem- 
perance forces and would ha\ c the united opposition 
he enemy; that a victory on that line would not 
decrease the consumption of liquor a single barrel 

and would therefore he worse than a 

Egregious defeat. The tirst committee finally of- 

Blunder fered, if the Anti-Saloon League would 

make its campaign against the entire 
liquor traffic, t ate financially, and to do any- 

thing and everything desired, or to retire absolutely 
if such a course were preferred by the league. This 
offer was declined and the Prohibitionists withdrew. 
leaving the full responsibilit) for the campaign and 
its results upon the league. The movement was 
beaten two to one, only about eight thousand votes 
being cast for the senseless proposition of the league. 
Time has vindicated every position taken by the Pro- 
hibitionists dtlring these conferences with the league 
committee, and the former now declare that the cam- 
paign was the most inexcusable blunder ever com- 
mitted in the name of the temperance forces any- 
where in America. The result was that the liquor 
interests were intrenched far more safely than ever 
before and the organization of a successful move- 
ment against this iniquity was rendered vastly more 
difficult : for if any educational benefits were se- 
cured as the result of the campaign they were de- 
stroyed by the overwhelming defeat at the polls. 
* * * 

S( i MUCH for history: now as to the present 
movement. — For weeks the Prohibitionists have been 
consulting with one another as to the wisdom of 
bringing on a campaign in this city. A week ago 
Sunday the Prohibition Union appointed a commit- 
tee of seven to take such action as was deemed best. 
The committee decided that such a movement ought 
to be managed by a federation of all the churches 
and any and every civic organization, regardless of 
religious or political affiliation, provided only that 
they would stand together for the one and only pur- 
pose of destroying the entire liquor traffic in this 
city. The committee therefore sent out invitations 

to the Church Federation representing 
The Plan 150 churches, the W. C. T. U, the Anti- 
That Fell Saloon League, the Prohibition party, 

the W. P. P. C, the Central Labor Un- 
ion, the Political Equality Club, the Salvation Army, 
the Volunteers of America and the Y. M. C. A. to 
meet in the Federation Coffee Club rooms on the 
following Friday evening. The plan of organization 
contemplated a general committee composed of one 
representative from every church and organization in 
the city. A tentative plan of work had been thought 
out ready to be submitted to such committee, the 
idea being to place one man in charge of each ward, 
a captain over each election precinct and a lieuten- 
ant over each block of fifty voters in the precinct. 
This would call for two thousand workers. With 
the federation of all the moral forces contemplated 
victory appeared in sight. 



NINE OF THESE organizations responded to 

the invitation. The Anti-Saloon League was not 
represented at the meeting and was not even court- 
eous enough to acknowledge the invitation. Bui on 
the very evening when the forces were gathering un- 
der this call newspaper announcement was made 
that the Anti-Saloon League bad met the da\ before 
ami decided to bring on a campaign at I he city elec- 
tion in 1909, nearly two years hence! (.real coup, 
wasn't it? Is it any wonder that a morning paper 

announced soon afterward that the liquor dealers 
were rejoicing over the postponement? Hardly. 
For well it knows that the same forccs'whieh were 
at work three years ago, resulting in a farcical cam- 
paign, doomed to defeat before it was launched, 
doubtless will prevent the bringing on of the inn- 
posed campaign at the city election of 1909. 
Great To a disinterested person it would appeal 
Coup that the announcement of the Anti-Saloon 
League, made two years ahead of time, was 
deliberately made for the purpose of demoralizing, 
discouraging and preventing the federated move- 
ment which has been outlined in the foregoing. No 
wonder the whiskey sellers are happy? Why should 
they not be? If the diaphanous action of the Anti- 
Saloon League is not worth $50,000 to them it is 
worth nothing. They can well afford to dig deep 
into their pockets to help the elague — it would be 
money well expended. For, in the light of history 
and the experiences of other communities, no suc- 
cessful movement against the liquor traffiic is pos- 
sible while the league insists upon pursuing the pol- 
icy of rule or ruin. Is not the idea of giving the 
whiskey interests almost two years' notice of the 
contemplated action a thousand-fold farcical ? 
* * * 

A NEW COLLECTION of R's seemed timely 
to these "leaders." The)' suggested a period of Re- 
cuperation, Rest and Relief — from Roosevelt. Per- 
haps the manner in which President Roosevelt's 
message has been received has convinced them that 
the suggestion isn't as timely as it seemed to them 
at first. Perhaps that message, presenting true 
Ropseveltian doctrines, even discouraged those who 
proposed to offer something "equally as good.' 
The "leaders" were beginning to operate in New 
England. They were trying to sew New England 
tight against Taft, to throttle the Taft sentiment 
which had rapidly developed. Senators Gallinger 
and Rurnham were to turn the trick in New Hamp- 
shire, for instance. But along comes Treasurer 
Dumaine, of the Amoskeag Cor- 

Ready for the poration, one of the most influ- 
"Band Wagon" ential men in the State, and tells 
them, by way of making small 
talk, that New Hampshire will send a solid Taft 
delegation to Chicago, extending, at the same time, 
two properly authenticated tickets of admissi in to 
the Taft band w r agon. Instead of being engaged 
in the ladylike pastime of sewing up New Hamp- 
shire, the two Senators are now prayerfully medi- 
tative and altogether quiescent. Not satisfied with 
thus depriving two senators of their legitimate 
amusement, Mr. Dumaine called also to pay his 
respects to Senator Crane of Massachusetts, in or- 
der that that gentleman might have the full benefit 
of his observations. As a result Senator Crane, 
also, has become duly thoughtful and even more 
perplexed than has recently been his normal condi- 
tion. And that's as far as the "leaders." up to date, 

have extended their New England operations. 



Pacific Outlook 



PRIVATELY certain anti-Roosevelt and anti- 
Taft representatives and senators were 1 saying that 
a Roosevelt platform should not be adopted at Chi- 
cago. They had not begun to say it publicly. It 
is not probable that now, after that has happened, 
they will say it publicly at all. But they are try- 
ing to effect a working alliance among the- "favorite 
sons," the purpose of which is to pool their strength 
and deliver it to whomsoever may demonstrate the 
best ability to take the nomination away from Sec- 
retary Taft. It is a beautiful plan, but observers of 
the game shrewdly suspect that it will prove abor- 
tive. For it has been made evident in more ways 
than one — and the Chicago Tribune poll, showing 
the strong position of Secretary 
Favorite Sons' Taft as the second choice in the 
Pool Plan states "controlled" by the "favor- 

ite sons", is quoted as an instance 
— that these same "favorite sons" cannot hold their, 
full delegations except perhaps for themselves, and 
will be unable to use them for purposes of barter, 
trade or sale. What a spectacle would be present- 
ed, for example, by the LaFollette delegates being 
turned over to the support of Vice-President Fair- 
banks, or vice versa ! And who will claim for Gov- 
ernor Hughes the ability to manipulate the New 
York delegation, even if he should be inclined to 
enter into such a deal ? It is a beautiful plan, but 
like the other plan — that of denouncing the Roose- 
velt policies — it is strictly tentative. And it is mil- 
lions to melons that it, too, will "die a 'bornin". 

* * * 

.THE "SOLID THREE" in the Board of Super- 
visors appear to have a double in the "solid six" in 
the City Council. In letters black and bold the 
names of these members of the council who have 
enabled the Los Angeles Railway Company practi- 
cally to steal a valuable franchise should be placard- 
ed conspicuously until the next municipal election 
rolls around. They are : Dromgold, Blanchard, 
Healy, Lyon, Clampitt and Yonkin. That the five 
members last named should have stood together on 
the proposition to hand over to the railway, with- 
out money and without price, the property which 
should have brought a revenue to the city was to 
have been expected. But that Councilman Drom- 
gold should line up with the franchise grab- 
Solid bers is a distinct disappointment to that ele- 

Six ment in the city which nominated and elect- 
ed him because it believed that he would 
stand first, last and all the time for the protection 
of the city's interests. In view of the action of the 
council on two or three recent occasions, it has 
become quite evident that the only staunch friends 
of the people, who may be depended upon at all 
times to fight for the welfare of the city rather than 
for the success of the embryo Democratic machine 
headed by the mayor and for the interests of the 
railways, are President Pease, Mr. Wallace and Mr. 
Wren. Although informed by City Attorney Hew- 
itt that the council could not do so legally, these 
six members of the council nevertheless gave the 
South Park franchise away. "Billy" Dunn's elo- 
quence is a thing of beauty and a joy forever. He 
is a plausible talker and a ripping lobbyist. 

* * * 

POLITICS is a serious matter with Bim and oth- 
er Button Men. They are obliged to pick a win- 
ner. If they pick a dead one, their little game isn't 
worth a mill on the million. That's what makes it 
interesting to note that the Button Men have put 



their money on Taft as first choice. John M. Cald- 
er, of Chicago, a manufacturer and close observer 
of political events, took the news to Washington re- 
cently. "A firm of button manufacturers in Chi- 
cagOi went to work a few days ago," he explained. 
"I had a talk with the head of the firm. He has 
picked Taft as first choice on the Republican side, 
with Hughes second. On the Democratic ticket he 
is all for Bryan as first choice, with John Johnson 
of Minnesota second. He said he wouldn't spend 
five cents on Cannon or Fairbanks — that the risk 
was too great. He hasn't been able to 
"Bim's" make up his mind on vice-presidential 
Tip probabilities, but thousands of Taft and 
Bryan buttons are to be thrown into the 
market at once." "Bim", of New York, is the origi- 
nal Button Man. He made his debut in that role 
at the St. Louis convention in 1896, when McKinley 
and Hobart were nominated. He got one hundred 
thousand McKinley buttons as a feeler, and they 
laid the groundwork for a handsome fortune since 
acquired. As Bim once said — Bim's full name is 
M. F. Bimberg, but no one ever paid any attention 
to it — "From the very start the buttons made a 
ten-strike. It was their first appearance and they 
certainly hit the public eye. Those hundred thou- 
sand buttons disappeared in a space of time so 
short I'd hate to speak of it in a familiar way." 
At the convention in Philadelphia, which nominat- 
ed McKinley and Roosevelt, Bim appeared on the 
scene with some millions of buttons. And when 
Roosevelt and Fairbanks were nominated, he had 
some millions more. He says he sold sixteen mil- 
lions of them. 

* * * 
DO WE REALLY like rattlety-bang manners or 
do we not? Do we want a rumpus or do we mere- 
ly endure it? We certainly live in a smashed sil- 
ence most of the time and it seems likely that the 
serene harmonies of the spheres would startle most 
of us more than the howling of any number of de- 
mons. A gentle voice is more notable than a dia- 
mond nose ring. Our hurried shouts are trying to 
catch the echoes on the bounds of space. H double 
L is the 'phone call our inward tumult speeds along 
the wire in rasping tones of haste. These melodi- 
ous reflections were suggested to us the other day 
by a call at one of the fashionable 
The Incivility family hotels. While waiting for 
of Noise the coming of a friend we found 

ourselves surrounded by the noisy 
and what we were pleased to think idiotic chatter 
of the servants, those flattering mirrors of what we 
pretend to be. They were as devoid of training and 
decorum as a vacuum. If they reflected any stan- 
dard of manners at all, it was that of savages. The 
only gentleman who appeared banged the door in 
accord with the rest of the hateful row. Must de- 
mocracy be expressed only by incivility? Can a 
free soul live in a snare drum only? Must angels 
swear to gain their freeing wings? Will no lackey 
serve us with the only thing of gold he possesses, 
his silence? Let us try to be quiet for a bit, traf- 
fickers in noise and teachers of unrest that we are — 
partakers in the dissonant symphony of our race. 
* * * 
THE PACIFIC OUTLOOK publishes this week 
an article on the subject of our National Guard and 
what the author — a militia expert of long service — 
considers as its deplorable weaknesses, which can- 
not fail to be of interest to any intelligent and patri- 
otic American citizen. Under the title of "National 



Pacific Outlook 



• I a Vital Necessity." this authority takes the 
American public, and especially the western public. 
-1< iii no uncertain language for it > indifference 
and in some cases open antipathy toward our org 
ized citizen soldiery, which, it is gcenrally conceded, 
is the real army of the L'nited States and must be 
our main and immediate reliance in case of war. 
He seeks to show that this in- 
Military Awake- ganization is dangerously, 
ning Urged ishly neglected, and makes 

interesting quotations to prove 
that the federal government is becoming aroused 
over our military shortcomings and is consummat- 
ing vital plans for the welding together, for war 
purposes, of the regular army and the National 
Guard. Los Angeles is offered a suggestion as to 

how. in the opinion of this authority, it might best 
further its own desires for military attention; and 
a Striking point is made of what would seem to 
he a fact — that it is the citizens of Los Angeles who 
must themselves defend Los Angeles, the citizens of 
California who must themselves defend California. 
m case of foreign invasion, inasmuch as the regular 
army, as now provided for by law. would form, in 
size, little more than a recruiting force in the event 
of a serious war. The article is commended to read- 
ers of the Pacific Outlook as offering a subject 
worthy of further discussion. 

THIS IS a fact: The other morning an "unem- 
ployed" came to a front door and calling attention 
to his presence by a vigorous push on the electric 
bell, announced that it was his desire to breakfast. 
Yielding to his assertive look the mistress explained 
that if he would be so good as to \ J isit the rear of 
the premises she would attempt to accumulate a 
handout. In due time the caller came into pos- 
session of hot coffee, bread and butter and a bowl 

of mush and milk, with which he 
Wouldn't It retired to a rocking chair and 

Curdle You? other comforts of home in the 

baby's playhouse. Seating himself 
to his eminent satisfaction, he turned and hailed 
the kitchen. "Say, Lady," he called, "can you let 
me have the morning paper?" Now, wouldn't that 
curdle you? Wasn't he a naive, delightful socialist. 
this "unemployed"? The mistress had had and 
paid for breakfast and he hadn't — so pass it around, 
and don't be too slow about it; the mistress had 
the morning paper and he hadn't — so trot it out and 
let me share it, but don't put me to the work of 
coming after it. Pleasant, easy-going chap! 
* * * 

A FAMl )US restaurant on the Boulevard St. 
Michael, in Paris, exceedingly popular with Ameri- 
can tourists on account of its well-known specialty 
of hare prepared after its own peculiar style, has 
suffered a severe loss of patronage through a dis- 
covery made the other day by a professor from the 
Museum of Natural History, who undertook an ex- 
ploration of the catacombs (this word would seem 
to be especially applicable in this instance) and 
found there — a horrible suggestion ! Directly be- 
neath the restaurant he. stumbled upon a large 
pyramidal mound which entire- 
Any Cat-acombs ly obstructed the passage. 
in Los Angeles? Holding his torch close to the 
mound he discovered (being a 
natural history expert) that it was made entire^- 



ls' heads, numbering many thousand 

showing that the) had been cast there that , 
day. The report of the discovery does not say 

whether the daring searcher un- 

ake his mission under the restatiranl by sus- 
picions aroused b) his expert observation of one ol 

the famout "bar.' stews" of the restaurant above, 

or merely through a natural hankering after cata 

combs. To our minds the importance of the dis- 
cover) lies in this — have we an) natural history ex- 
perts in the Los Angeles Health Department who 

could tell the skull of a kitty from that of a humn 
in the exploration of possible, but improbable, loca'i 

cat-ao nubs' 

* * * 

\ RECENT ISSl'K of the Sun Trade Journal, a 
monthly magazine published in Tokio, partly in 
English but chiefly in Japanese, contains an editor- 
ial which will afford some illumination as to the 
Janancse view of the sailing of the Pacific fleet. 
"The interesting feature of the dispatch of the 
squadron in reference to the question of our relation 
with America." says this paper, "is that it is much 
discussed in America, while Janan cares little about 
it. To us, it is all same whether these battleships 
be in the Atlantic or in the Pacific. For the pres- 
ence of the squadron near Japan does not at once 
mean the opening of hostilities between Japan and 
America. Nor can it menace the safety of this 
country. The Americans, I tell the truth, are mis- 
taken if thev believe they can frighten us by send- 
in"- their squadron to the Far East. Admiral Togo 
and Admiral Kamimura are not afraid of any 
American squadron. But this circumstance is not 
appreciated in America. The New York Sun is 
onnosed to the cruise and says that there is no use 
of the squadron manoeuvring in the Pacific at the 
expense of the good feeling of 
Japanese Japan. But the truth is that Japan 

Viewpoint. will not feel angry in the least at 
the coming of the American squad- 
ron. The Americans may rest assured that we 
shall accord the squadron such a cordial reception 
as could be expected of a friendly country. Mr. 
Hearst, the king of American yellow journalism, 
approves of the proposed cruise. He describes 
Japan as a mrate among nations, who regards war 
as a profitable profession. America, he says, must 
be always prepared for a war, or she will incur 
great disasters in the future. I wonder at the 
imaginative power to conceive such a mistaken 
view. Any person wdio can understand the present 
day Japan will have seen that we do not want any 
war at present. It is a pure Me to say that Japan 
wants to wage a war with America. True there 
exists a commercial campaign in the Far East. 
But this peaceful object ought to be attained by 
peaceful means. If America desires to push on her 
commerce in the Far East at the bayonet's cud. 
then, America, and not Japan, shall be held respon- 
sible for a wicked ami unreasonable war. America 
will not be so foolish to wage such a war. There 
lies a deeper question of the naval supremacy in the 
Pacific, which, however, President Roosevelt will 
be too prudent and the American public too 
ignorant to avow." 

* * * 
"How shall we announce our engagement?' 
'Tell a couple of your girl friends and make them 
promise not to tell." — Houston Post. 



10 



Pacific Outlook 



CKile Con Came 



If there is anybody who is utterly despicable it is the 
man who, with pen or voice, attempts to decry the 
apprehension, prosecution, conviction and punishment 
of the rich law-breakers, the men who, because their 
necessities are so amply provided for and have no 
excuse in the world, except an insane desire for 
greater wealth, for doing it, bribe mayors and super- 
visors, control conventions and own state officials. — 
Oakland Enquirer. 

The farmers out in Hemet are wideawake to the 
value of advertising in print. They have offered 
a local restaurateur ten sacks of their choicest Bur- 
bank spuds for use at the Los Angeles Chamber of 
Commerce banquet, Feb. 22, in exchange for this line 
on the menu card: "Baked Hemet Burbanks." This 
is a pretty high rate of pay for the space and circu- 
lation involved. 

During the days immediately following the San 
Francisco earthquake William F. Herrm, M. H. de 
Young and Harrison Gray Otis were great chums, 
riding about town in the same automobile and "taking 
in" everything together. Possibly this fact may assist 
a not too dense mind in arriving at a clear conclusion 
about some things which have since transpired. 

Why is a circus? Because it's a tent. Why is a 
circus tent ? Because it's mysterious and always leaves 
before it has grown familiar. Witness the threatened 
premature dissolution of Dick's "Indoor." The Amer- 
ican public refuses to yield up its original conception 
of the great national show. 

With a "solid three" in the Board of Supervisors 
and a "solid six" in the City Council, Los Angeles 
county and Los Angeles city are having a splendid ob- 
ject lesson in government of, by and for "de push." 

Mr. Dooley declares that "Opperchunity sometimes 
knocks the dure down an' comes in an' hits ye on the 
head." The opportunity-stricken head in Los Angeles 
aches still. 

If you want people to talk about you, keep your 
mouth closed. Especially does this rule apply if you 
are a high public official and the people grow too in- 
quisitive. 



The trouble with most 



their 



__Me with most women is that their 
affections are too highly concentrated. Less intensity, 
fewer teary tableaux. 

To the second highest bidder out of half a dozen 
belongs the spoils, if he happens to stand in with 
the "solid three." 

Phoenix, Arizona, is about to investigate its "booze" 
trust. This is one of the tricks Los Angeles did not 
teach Phoenix. 

Patience may be a great virtue, but the wise man 
is he who knows when the time for the exercise of 
patience ceases. 

He who apologizes for criminals of the Calhoun 
stamp need not be expected to tell the truth about 
other matters. 

For the first time in forty years February will have 
five Saturdays. This will not happen again for sev- 
enty-six years. 

Ex-Governor Pardee is to lecture in Alameda on 
"Who Governs Us?" Time wasted, Governor. We 
all know. 



No woman is so clever as the woman who is so 
clever as not to let a man know how clever she 
really is. 

The "swelledest" head usually is adorned by a six 
and three-quarters hat. 

The man who leads an unclean private life need not 
be expected to lead an upright public life. 

Let us be thankful that more than thirteen months 
of the present municipal administration have passed. 

Councilman Dromgold held out as long as he could, 
but — well, we are all human. 

No use asking the mayor to sing that popular ballad 
of DeKoven's any more. 

That Morse who is returning from Europe is not 
our old and intimate friend R. E. 

The fall of Franco is a. tip to Herrin. It's a bad 
year for dictators. 

* * * 

Elmilie F. Stowe 

The poem found on another page of this issue, 
entitled "The Sierra Madre Mountains," was writ- 




Miss Emilie F. Stowe 

ten for the Pacific Outlook by Emilie F. Stowe, who 
has made Los Angeles her home for the past two 
years. Miss Stowe is a member of the family 
which included the husband of Harriet Beecher 
Stowe. A native of Boston, she removed to the 
Middle West early in life and for many years was 
engaged in literary work in Des Moines, Iowa, 
where her independent literary column under the 
caption "The Red Pencil" in the Leader, afterwards 
merged with the Register, won for her more than 
local fame. She has been a frequent contributor of 
verse and travel letters to various eastern maga- 
zines and newspapers. Miss Stowe has traveled 
extensively through Old Mexico and has written 
some of the most fascinating stories of life in that 
country which have appeared in recent years. 



Pacific Outlook 



11 



S6c Sierra Madre Mountains 



By Emilik F. Stowe 

They are the great grand punctuation marks 

Gcd wrote on Nature's page 

When scythe of time its first bright edge did have. 

Like men, these everlasting hills 

Do seem to have their moods, 

Though never set to lightsome key. 

Like solemn anthems, they* 

Which at the birth-hour of the world 

Grand, noble orisons did chant, 

Then hushed forever were in silence, 

Yet silence more profoundly eloquent 

Than loudest waves of sound, 

As if in answer to the Voice, 

"Be still and know. that I am God." 

When about their forms majestic they draw 

The violet mists, their lovely raiment 

Spun in elfin loom whose warp and woof is 

Wine of sunshine, thread of moonlight, 

Breath of blossom, plant, — all subtle forces 

Of earth and air, the sky and sea, 

In lexicon of man, the atmosphere, 

Thus robed in garmenture of state, 

They seem withdrawn, as if in prayer, 

Mayhap for sorrows of a burdened world 

O'er which for eons unnumbered 

They've kept such steadfast watch and ward. 

Their snow-clad upward-reaching peaks 

Seem seeking hand of God to find and clasp. 

The fleece of clouds that kiss their crests 

Trailing robes of angels 

Who bear the happy dead beyond life's pain. 



12 



Pacific Outlook 




>§wggg|@@tiora 



BY A MII.ITIA OFFICER OF LONG SERVICE IN ANOTHER STATE 



LOS ANGELES might as well give up its de- 
sire for an army brigade post, until the Ameri- 
can people furnish the United States government 
with an army of sufficient size for its various parts 
to be found without the aid of a microscope when 
properly distributed over our country and posses- 
sions. As it is now, the entire regular army acting 
in conjunction would not be adequate to defend 
any one of our great seaboard cities from a deter- 
mined and prepared enemy. 

On paper, the regular army shows considerable 
strength; but actually, what is its strength? Of 
the eight companies of infantry which were ordered 
to GoTdfield during the recent disturbances the to- 
tal muster was about 250 men ! Recently a picture 
was published showing the muster of a whole bat- 
talion at. one of our army posts, and it did not total 
one regulation company! Much the same conditions 
prevail throughout our regular military organiza- 
tion. It is a mere skeleton. 

What is the use of Los Angeles demanding a 
brigade post when there are no soldiers to fill it if 
it should be granted? Even if an order were issued 
designating Los Angeles a brigade post, the result 
would be the quartering here of the skeletons of 
two or three companies — a mere handful of meii, 
at the most. As a business proposition their pres- 
ence here would amount to next to nothing; they 
would be too few to create any trade, and the Am- 
erican soldier, officer or man, has no money, any- 
how, nor is much spent in feeding him. The great 
government of the United States doles to the officer 
just sufficient of alms to keep him alive, and that's 
all. His only Incentives to study and work his life 
away and be faithful to the army and .the poverty 
it imposes while opportunities for personal enrich- 
ment, selfish success, invite him on every hand, are 
patriotic ones; and while this is all a very noble 
idea, it will not keep an army recruited up to use- 
ful strength in time of peace. In time of war pat- 
riotism whelms selfishness and citizens give them- 
selves freely; but then the blow has already fallen, 
and the result is a massacre of unmilitary masses of 
patriots, untrained, unequipped, unready. 

As for protection, the number of soldiers the gov- 
ernment could apportion to Los Angeles, if a post 
were established here, would amount to relatively 
nothing. 

This line of thought brings us to the subject of 
the organized militia, the National Guard of the 
various states, which really is the army of the 
United States so far as the preservation of the land 
in time of serious stress is concerned. Now, the 
thing for Los Angeles to do is not to spend time 
and money trving to bring a handful of Regulars 
here, but to exert its influence to the limit to bring 
the National Guard of California to a high point in 
numbers and efficiency, and to make Los Angeles 
a great National Guard center. 

In the first place, you, citizens of Los Angeles, 
will defend your city and your port in the next 



war; and probabilities are that in the next war 
the first blow will fall right on this coast. The 
Regular will be lost, to you, in the shuffle. In the 
next place, you will get more fun, more trade and 
more military training in the times of profoundest 
peace, from the government's regular military es- 
tablishment by encouraging your own state sol- 
diery than by making requests to Washington. 

For instance, if, instead of offering the govern- 
mend land for a brigade post, Los Angeles should 
provide for the state's military organization an ade- 
quate manoeuvering ground with a long distance 
rifle range (a 1000-yard range does not yet exist in 
this state), the whole well equipped .from a sani- 
tary and transportation standpoint, you soon would 
bring to door the doors of Los Angeles, for en- 
campment and target practice, not only the whole 
Guard of the Pacific Coast, but also large bodies of 
Regulars and detachments of bluejackets from our 
warships whenever the latter chance to touch at 
neighboring ports. Ohio spent $36,000 on its new 
rifle range at Camp Perry, on Lake Erie, last year, 
and before it was finished the National Rifle Asso- 
ciation had arranged to hold its next national shoot 
there, and both state and regular troops were vie- 
ing for its use. Here such a range could be used 
the year round. 

The opportunity is ripe for the establishment of 
just such a military attraction in the vicinity of 
Los Angeles. The government is very much in 
need of an adequate rifle range in this locality. The 
navy, especially, would be glad to make use of it. 
Even for its small arms practice on the Pacific 
Coast the navy must land its men at Magdalena 
Bay, in foreign territory. If Los Angeles had an 
adequate small arms range ready now, there is 
small doubt that Admiral Evans' great fleet could 
be induced to do its rifle practice here. There is 
much open ground in this vicinity that would be 
suitable for such a purpose, and the great network 
of electric and steam railroads radiating from this 
city would make almost any location that might 
be chosen readily accessible, both for sightseers 
and for arriving and departing soldiers and sailors. 

The western states are deplorably weak on 
their militia, California among them. The eastern 
states have done far more toward encouraging their 
military organizations ; though all through the 
country there has been manifested in certain classes 
— and still is manifested, though to a constantly 
lessening extent — an actual antipathy toward the 
National Guard. Where there is not actual anti- 
pathy there is an indifference, an apathy that is 
almost as blighting as absolute opposition. Mer 
chants and business men — a class which has the 
most property interests at stake in the case of war 
or riot — seem, in large measure, to be blind to the 
importance to the republic of a highly organized 
citizen soldiery, and instead of encouraging their 
clerks and employes to join the military, actually 
discourage them by objecting to their occasional 



Pacific Outlook 



13 



n service and often causing them to for- 
feit their positions when the Naitonal Guard is 
called upon to perform some necessary duty. 

This strange when we consider mir form 

ivernment and the fact that it prohibits us — 
and properly so — from maintaining a large lin com- 
parison with other powers) standing army. Our 
ice for protection must be on a highly organ- 
ized citizen soldiery, and without the active co- 
operation of the American public at large, this is 
an impossible organization to perfect. 

in connection with the indifference of employes 
in general to the militia may be noted an opposite 
class, the labor unions, which often go to the point 
of treason in their opposition to the National Guard. 
Only a few days ago a report from Sacramento 
said: "Officials at the state capital say that the 
Painters' Union has a strong aversion to the Na- 
tional Guard and absolutely prohibits its members 
belonging to that organization, and what is more, 
generally refuses to admit to membership any man 
who has at any time served in the militia." The 
report went on to say that a union painter working 
on the state building joined a militia company. A 
few days later he was approached by a walking 
delegate and told that he would have to either 
sever his connection with the National Guard or 
the Painters' Union. He declared he would do 
neither, and the superintendent of workmen at the 
capitol was then informed that all the painters 
would be called off the building if this man were 
retained at work there. The superintendent is re- 
ported to have laid the matter before Adjutant 
General Lank, who, it is said, promised to look into 
it and to see that the Union is prosecuted, if guilty, 
under the following section of the Penal Code of, 
California : 

"No association or corporation shall by any con- 
stitution, rule, by-law, resolution, vote or regula- 
tion, discriminate against any member of the Na- 
tional Guard of California because of his member- 
ship therein. Any person who wilfully aids in en- 
forcing any such constitution, rule, by-law, reso- 
lution, vote or regulation against any member of 
said National Guard of California, is guilty of a 
misdemeanor." 

Here is the case of an American citizen denied 
his livelihood by his fellow workers because he 
patriotically allied himself with the citizen soldiery, 
which, in a republic that has pledged itself not to 
maintain a burdensome regular army, is the na- 
tion's main reliance for protection against foreign 
invasion ! And all this occurring in the very capital 
of the state ! 

The time has passed when we can depend on our 
"isolated" national position for immunity from at- 
tack. This has become a very rich and tempting 
land — its very richness and commercial strength 
have made it unwieldy and vulnerable, and so a 
likely object of invasion. As Justice Harlan of the 
United States Supreme Court said recently: "There 
is no such thing as friendship between nations as 
between men. Nations make no sacrifice to pre- 
serve friendships and do not forebear to do certain 
things because they do not meet with the approval 
of another nation." 

The modern progress of men and nations has 
forced its into relations with the world at large 
which are likely to entangle us any day. In early 
times the majority of our citizens were country 
bred, familiar with the contour of large areas of 




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READ- 

The Right Hand Columns 

The publishers of the PACIFIC OUT- 
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vertising contracts; and while it is impos-; 
sible to investigate the merits of every 
article or institution advertised, we want to 
know that the advertiser is honest and is 
acting in good fatih before we present his 
announcement to the PACIFIC OUT- 
LOOK'S readers. 

We believe the advertisements in these 
columns to be truthful and worthy of your 
attention. If you want or need any article 
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it, you should go to the firm advertising 
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14 



Pacific Outlook 



territory, used to the life of trie open, immune to 
the hardships of camp life, trained in the use of the 
rifle from boyhood. There were few "great cities 
to protect, the nation had little to do with world 
politics, and the country could rely on the prowess 
and personal fighting qualities of the individual 
citizen. But the day of the minute man is past. 
Nothing can be accomplished in modern warfare 
except through intensive organization ; this is the 
day in which trained co-operation alone achieves 
lasting victories. In the matter of modern war- 
fare it is absolutely necessary to be prepared to* 
foil the first blow of the enemy; the thrust is quick 
and scientific, and all is soon over, for one combat- 
ant or the other. 

What would the skeleton> organization of our 
regular army avail us if some fighting nation sev- 
ered friendly relations with us tomorrow, or next, 
week, or next month? The defensive of some one! 
great threatened seaport, were the navy not handy,' 
or, had it been broken through, would give it a 
stomachfull, without thought of our outlying pos- 
sessions. Upon what would the nation depend 
for the repulse of the enemy — the immediate, vital 
repulse, without considering offensive operations 
at all? The citizen soldiery — the organized Na-- 
tional Guard. That great multitude of war in- 
flamed patriots — the Volunteers, raw and moblike 
at the outbreak of hostilities — with which the ulti- 
mate offensive operations would be conducted, 
would be practically useless in the first line of de- 
fense. Their training would have to proceed behind 
whatever organized army we might already have 
at the moment of the declaration of war. 

Is the' National Guard — the real Army of the 
United States — prepared, in the full military sense 
of the word? Americans are awakening to the fact 
that it is not, and, it ,is gratifying to say, effective 
rheasures .are being taken — or rather, comprehen- 
sive plans are being made, which, if entered into 
by the states with genuine patriotic spirit, as de- 
velopments' are promising that they will be — will 
place the military organism of the nation, on a sen- 
sible, practical basis. 

Througlt that growing organization, the National 
Guard Association, representing the militia of all 
the states and territories, the military department 
of the Federal government and the National Guard 
are being drawn ino constantly increasing intimacy 
and the relationship which naturally should exist 
between the two is being developed. The annual 
convention of the National Guard Association in 
Boston in January was an occasion of great im- 
portance, from a military standpoint, to the nation. 
The regular army was represented by several 
prominent officers of high rank, and Gen, Robert, 
Shaw Oliver, Assistant Secretary of War (really 
the active head of the War Department) addressed 
the convention. To those who do not realize the 
real importance of the Naional Guard to' the nation, 
the following quotations from the address of this 
representative of the regular army should be en- 
lightening-:, 

"I have no set speech to make, but I want to try 
to correct a few misapprehensions that I think ex- 
ist, and also to lay before you some of the plans 
of the War Department for th~ improvement of 
the National Guard at large. 

"The armed forces that the United States de- 
pends upon are : First, the Regular Army, a small 
body, carefully trained, always subject to the or- 




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Pacific Outlook 



15 



of the President; second, the National Guard, 
a lar. moderately trained, subject to ti- 

nt ,ni certain occasions (that is. 
during war. insurrection, invasion, etc.). 

"Now, I do not think that many of the National 
rdsmen realize that they are exactly on the 
same plane as the Regular Army if war occurred 
tomorrow. Every National Guardsman, the day 
he signs his enlistment paper, or every officer of 
the National Guard, whenever he takes his oath, 
enlists for the war. I'" you realize that? There 
has he'-n so much talk, some loose talk, on the ques- 
tion of whether the National Guard was in the first 
line or the second line, or whether precedence 
would he taken by the volunteers, that I should 
like to have yon ail take that in. Gentlemen, you 
are in the first line, ami you have volunteered. 
(Applause.) The thing is done. 

"Then we depend, after those two that I have 
mentioned, upon a third body — the volunteers. 
The present volunteer law is archaic, and we want 
a new law: but the volunteers are an entirely sep- 
arate body. The National Guard today are the 
state volunteers, and are identical, almost, with the 
volunteers of 1861, particularly if they remove the 
nine-months' limit. So that if you are called into 
service tomorrow, you come just as you are. (Ap- 
plause.) There is no change in the present statutes 
necessary. I want you to understand that. No 
further legislation is needed today on that point. 
That is the law now. Take that home with you. 
Many of you do not realize that in the event of 
war you become at once part of the United States 
Army. "We want you to realize it, and to count 
on it" 

In the same connection. Gen. Charles Dick, 
United States Senator from Ohio and father of the 
Dick bill for the reorganization of the National 
Guard, said, in an interview published in "Arms and 
the Man": 

"Have you ever thought in what a peculiarly dual 
position the National Guardsman stands? A few 
units, scattered here and there through a com- 
munity, bound by no common tie except that of ser- 
vice to their state, become suddenly a powerful 
factor in restoring normal conditions. Or they are 
called on to do duty in some terrible catastrophe, 
in succoring the wounded and policing the stricken 
neighborhood. Their tasks in this regard finished, 
of a sudden a war cloud may assemble on a far 
horizon. Once again the trained Guardsman be- 
comes a national bulwark, ready to defend his state 
or to give his life on the altar of his country's 
honor. 

"During the days of peace, those countless days 
of preparation when the Guaidsman is learning the 
many duties which, properly assimilated, make him 
the potential hero of a civic or an international 
crisis, the public at large is indifferent alike to the 
nobility of his purposes and the accomplishment 
of his aims. In no tangible or concrete manner. 
except, perhaps, by gathering along the line of a 
parade, does the ordinary citizen indicate anything- 
but an amused tojerance of the Guardsman and his 
work." 

The report of the executive committee of the Na- 
tional Guard Association contained the following 
sensible observations, which should be read by 
every citizen who still is indifferent to the necessity 
to the republic of an organized militia: 

"Lack of education in military affairs begets want 



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Pacific Outlook 



of interest. Our people in time of peace know little 
and care less about military things. In time of 
war, with the most of courage and least of knowl- 
edge, they throw themselves gallantly into the 
breach, to serve as best they may. They are good 
soldiers when trained. So far they have had most 
of their training during war. At the close of war 
they go back to peace pursuits and fall heir to a 
conviction that it is impossible for war to come 
again. 

"These are the real reasons for lack of progress 
in this direction. That there has been no progress 
does not constitute a sufficient reason why there 
should be no progress. 

"In the beginning our forefathers were opposed 
to a large standing army; so are we. They believed 
in the Militia as a national military force; so do 
we, but in a different way, and in another kind of 
Militia. Their fear of a large standing army was 
honestly come by. It was bred by their experi- 
ences in the lands from which they came. They 
dreaded a military dictatorship, and their appre- 
hensions were not without cause, under the cir- 
cumstances. In a new country, without settled, 
fixed and determined limits to its powers, purposes 
or plans, such an event was not impossible or even 
improbable. 

"Every citizen in the days of '76. owned a weapon 
and was more or less trained in its use, a condition 
which continued for many years thereafter. What 
was more simple, natural, and logical than to pro- 
vide first that citizens should always have arms in 
their possession, and then offer a plan under which 
they could be enrolled and ordered forth?" 

The plan which the government has in con- 
templation for the welding together, for war pur- 
poses, of the regular army and the National Guard, 
may be outlined brief!}' as follows : 

The entire country is divided into eight parts, so 
far as the semi-annual camps of the Regular Army 
are concerned. Under the newly proposed plan 
outlined by General Oliver and received with mani- 
fest interest by the National Guard delegates, in- 



stead of one regiment of the Militia, every regi- 
ment of volunteers which happens to come within 
the entire district adjacent to the scene of mobiliza- 
tion will be invited to mobilize with the regular 
troops. 

In this way the Regular and Militia branches of 
the Army will be welded by joint active camp ser- 
vice, which the War Department figures will be not 
only beneficial to both, but extremely valuable in 
the way of strengthening the country's defenses. 

"I have had this plan in my mind, a long time,"' 
declared General Oliver, "but the War Department 
will require the co-operation of the states in bring- 
ing it to a successful fulfilment. With uniforms 
and accouterments provided, the men would mob- 
ilze for active service, provided with everything but 
transportation. 

"It would be a grand thing for officers and men. 
The idea is to have regular corps, and brigades, 
and staff, under such mobilization, and volunteer 
forces would retain these corps, and brigade, and 
staff positions permanently. In the event of war 
they would then know without a moment's notice 
just what wing the}' were to serve in." 

The cry that "this is not a military country and 
must not be made one," is. the truth, and yet it is 
usually uttered ignorantly and without thought for 
certain unavoidable military facts which must be 
faced and accommodated — not 'in the interests of 
war, but for the preservation of peace at the least 
sacrifice of life and property. A man whose duty 
takes him out laden with gold by day and by 
night among rough folk and envious folk and 
barbarians, as well as among the nice and consid- 
erate people with whom he expects always to main- 
tain amicable relations, might as well say, "I'm not 
a fighting man so I needn't take any precautions 
for my own safety." Nor can a nation be a power 
for reform in the world, as the world is now consti- 
tuted, unless it have sufficient physicial strength to 
maintain its championship of the right. The United 
States learned an appalling lesson in the disastrous 
possibilities of military unpreparedness in its little 




Pacific Outlook 



17 



war with Spain. Undoubtedly, it would be gener- 
ally conceded now. even if there were some who 
then, that this war was undertaken in a 
righteous couse. It was orect a r, 

nized abuse: it was undertaken that the world's 
liberty might be further increased. And what did 
-t us — unnecessarily cost us, that is — in men 
and money and reputation just because we were 
not physically prepared to enforce our own right- 
eous threats against an abuser of human liberties? 
Our principal loss — and all of it sheer waste — was 
at our own hands, from disease, because almost no- 
body knew how to take care of himself under war 
conditions, and less how to take care of anybody 
else. The medical service, transportation service, 
commissary service, was in a tangle in no time: the 
great bulk of the fighting force was, at first, little 
better than a well trained mob, unacquainted, un- 
provided-tor and confused — in short, the army 
with which we bad to do the heavy fighting was ab- 
solutely unorganized. 

To have an adequate organized army of defense 
we do not have to maintain a burdensome standing 
army. Public interest and co-operation can bring 
the National Guard to a point of efficiency where 
it will fulfill all the needs of national defense and 
still leave the republic an "unmilitary nation." 

Nothing can be of greater military importance 
to the nation, next to proper organization, than 
that the American citizen shall know how to handle 
a ritle properly and -to hit the object at which he 
may shoot. The National Rifle Association is do- 
ing much to improve conditions along this line, and 
the whole country is gradually beginning to take 
an interest in long- distance military rifle shooting. 
A splendid scheme is that which is introducing into 
public schools scientific training in the loading and 
aiming of the regulation army weapon. A scheme 
has been devised whereby the pupil may sight and 
"fire" an unloaded weapon and register on a me- 
chanical device attached to the gun the spot cor- 
responding to that on the target which the actual 
bullet would have pierced. The government is also 
giving much encouragement to actual target prac- 
tice in the various private military academies 
throughout the country. 

With reference to the introduction of rifle train- 
ing into the public schools the cry has been heard 
from a certain narrow minded class that "American 
parents are not raising children to be shot at," and 
so forth. The ignorance of this view of the sub- 
ject could not be exceeded. In time of war the able 
bodied man who can shoot straight is in less danger 
of himself being shot than the equally well inten- 
tioned citizen soldier who, through ignorance of a 
gun, merely offers himself a target to the enemy 
without the ability to accomplish any damage 
against the latter; and war will not be stricken from 
tiie nation's list of possibilities by refusal on the 
part of its citizens to learn to shoot straight. 

Again let it be insisted that what Los Angeles 
ought to do is to take measures to provide an ade- 
quate manoeuvering ground and long distance rifle 
range for its citizen soldiery, and it would become 
quickly a center for the military encampments and 
rifle shoots of the entire Pacific Coast, in which the 
regular army and the navy undoubtedly would 
often participate. 

The day when the National Guardsman can be 
sneered at as a "tin soldier" has passed. The 



Guardsman who has drilled and worked in the 
ranks of the militia in the past with no other re- 
ward than the cowardhj I I be public, is the 
real patriot of the land. It is time now thai lie be 

given the consideration he deserves, that adequate 
armories be built for him. wherein be may fore- 
gather and drill anil study in quarters thai are siil 
ficient and pleasant, and that will be an incentive to 
Other citizens to join bis ranks. lie is not in the 
militia because of the "pretty clothes" anil gold 
lace, as some people insinuate. There's nothing in 
the world worn by man any more forjorn looking 
or less gold-lacey than the usual uniform of the 
militiaman, especially in the western states. 

In some of the eastern states, notably New York 
and Pennsylvania, splendid armories have been 
built, wherein large bodies of soldiery may train 
and their equippment be properly cared for; and in 
other ways they are constantly improving the con- 
ditions of National Guard service. In California, 
militia conditions cannot be said to be of a high 
standard. The new government plan which pro- 
vides for the welding of the National Guard with 
the regular army For war purposes, also provides for 
the arming and equipping for the field of the militia 
at government expense. Therefore the state's ap- 
propriation for its National Guard can and should 
be devoted to building proper armories and provid- 
ing suitable permanent encampment grounds and 
rifle ranges. 

Some people hiss, "sh !" when those who take the 
trouble to think and worry over these matters, 
openly discuss our deplorable military shortcom- 
ings ; but really, the only hope of having them 
righted lies in crying them aloud. Apparently the 
only way to .arouse the American people from their 
personal absorption to a national danger is to shout 
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PHOTOGRAPHER... 



18 



Pacific Outlook 




SOCIETY 




Two Questions 

An amazed man wants to know why a girl will go 
out on the street in a summer shirtwaist with elbow 
sleeves and her hands in a big fur muff. The person 
who can answer that no doubt can also tell why a 
man wears his gloves in his outside coat pocket with 
always just two fingers showing, instead of putting 
them on his hands. 



Back to Grecian Lines 

Joyful is the news that comes from Paris ! The 
Greek gown is to be worn by fashion leaders. Which 
means that beautiful dressing is coming to be under- 
stood at last, and that the body of woman, tortured 
into every grotesque shape and made hideous with 
every variety of meaningless "decoration," is, for a 




Miss Marjorie Brown 

Who is returning from a year's musical study in New York 

Photo by Marion Lehmann 

time at least, to be freed of the monstrous restrictions 
put upon it by the model-makers. 

The return to the beautiful has been slow indeed. 
Perhaps it is only because the ugly has been exhausted 
in the eternal quest for something different. The 
Greek gown being the last deviation, it had to be 
adopted. The extremity of the fashion despots of 
Paris is woman's opportunity. Let's make the best of 
it and while we have the chance, strike for simplicity. 



While on the agonizing question of clothes let us 
pause again to give thanks for the change that has 
come about gradually in the matter of texture. There 
was a time when the majority of women did not care 
so very much about quality, but more and more is 
shown a higher appreciation for what is fine and rich 
and less for the merely showy. We have the Japanese 
to thank for this much of our education. The im- 
portation of the gorgeous kimonos with their exquisite 
embroideries has set us a new standard for dress 
adornment. 

In a Greek gown, of texture soft and fine, fashioned 
on those undulating, flowing lines and embellished 
with rich embroideries, every woman should be as 
beautiful as Queen Luise — or nearly. 



Musicale at the Bellevue 

Mrs. Blanche Hennion Robinson and Mrs. Leroy 
Plummer gave a deligiitful musicale and tea at the 
Bellevue Terrace Monday, entertaining one hundred 
and fifty. The programme was perfectly arranged 
and executed and consisted of songs by Mrs. Plummer 
and Miss Estelle Heartt, Mrs. Blanche Robinson and 
Miss Louise Nixon Hill ; piano solos by Mrs. Robin- 
son, Mrs. Cooke and Miss Lillian Smith ; and trios, 
violin, 'cello and piano, by Mrs. Robinson and the 
Misses Lucy and Rosamund Fuhrer of San Francisco. 
Assisting in receiving were Mrs. O. D. Williams, Mrs. 
Carrie Sawyer, Miss Louise Nixon Hill and Miss 
Estelle Catherine Heartt. Mrs. Edward O'Brien and 
Mrs. Gresswell, attired in kimonos, to carry out the 
Japanese motif, employed in the decorations, poured 
tea. Almond blossoms, Japanese lanterns and other 
Oriental accessories made a very effective setting for 
the affair. 



Pasadena's Charity Ball 

Pasadena's most important social event, the annual 
Charity Ball, is to take place in the large white ball- 
room of Hotel Green, Thursday evening, Feb. 27. The 
Children's Training Society is to be the beneficiary of 
this affair, as of the previous balls, which usually have 
netted about $1,500. A group of Pasadena society 
women composes the committee on arrangements and 
they will be assisted by a large number of other 
women, among them several of the winter guests of 
the hotel. Col. Green, as before, is exerting himself 
to make the ball a success. Those on the entertain- 
ment committee are Mrs. Edward B. Kellam, Mrs. 
Charles Russell, Mrs. Harrison I. Drummond, Mrs. 
H. Page Warden, Mrs. Edward Groenendyke, Mrs. 
Arthur A. Libby and Mrs. Charles Cranz Perkins. 



Valentine Dance 

A Valentine dancing party was given by Miss Ma- 
thilde Bartlett Tuesday evening at her home "Fenton 
Knoll," West Adams street. She was assisted in re- 
ceiving by her mother, Mrs. W. S. Bartlett, Mrs. J. 
A. Bartlett, Mrs. Lanier Bartlett and Miss Margaret 
Bartlett. St. Valentine ruled in all the appointments. 



Pacific Outlook 



19 



Red hearts were everywhere in evidence. They were 
med from the asparagus pluinosus with which 
the walls were hung and pictured on the dance pro- 
mes. The guests include))! Mr. and Mrs. Frank 
Walsh. Mr. and Mr-. J. T. Fitzgerald. Mr.- and Mrs. 
Will McCoy, Misses Marie Bowden, Gertrude King, 
Alice Smith. Katharine RidgeVay, Virginia Walsh. 
Bessie BeDell, Juana Creighton, Henrietta Moss- 
backer, Beatrice (utter. Ethelwyn Walker. Mabel 
Stuart. Genevieve Downing, Italia Bower, Hor- 
tense Barnhatl Jones, Alice Barr; Pauline 
I'.arr. 1 )r. James McCoy, Dr. A. I'.. Leavelle, Messrs. 
Robert Smith. Percy Eisen, Robert Leonard, Willedd 
Andrew-. Charles Crenshaw, Heber Coleman, Jesse 
Gemmill, Harry Chandler, Herbert Rosecrans, Walter 
Butler, Rey Rule. Le Rov Edwards, Lanier I'.urtlett. 



MARRIES NAVAL OFFICER. 

The marriage of Mis- Anna Chapman, daughter of 
Judge and Mrs. John S. Chapman, to Past Assistant 
Paymaster Ervin A. McMillan. U. S. X.. took place 
Wednesday evening at the bride's home on North Soto 
street. Boyle Heights. Rev. J. S. Thompson of the 
Independent (.'lunch of Christ performed the cere- 
mony. The bride wore a princess gown of white 
oriental silk, lace garnitured and embroidered in 
cherry blossoms. 1 ler flowers were lilies of the valley. 
She was attended by her sister. Miss Mary Chap- 
man, who wore white crepe silk, embroidered in pink, 
and carried a bouquet of Cecil Bruner roses. The 
'in was attended by Paymaster Rishworth Nickol- 
-en. Paymaster W. A. Greer, Paymaster J. S. Kutz 
and Lieut. F. A. Barber, U. S, N. Mr. and Mrs.. 
McMillan left on a short wedding trip to Southern 
California resorts. They will make their home at' 
Visalia. 



The engagement is announced of Miss Louise Har- 
vey, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Flarvey of 1119 
El Modino street, and Edmund Ogden Sawyer, a well- 
known newspaper man of Los Ang'eles. The mar- 
riage is to take place, in June. Miss Harvey was a 
student at Pomona College and is an' accomplished 
musician, and Mr. Sawyer has many friends in and 
out of his profession. He is the son of Dr. and Mrs. 
E. O. Sawyer of West Fortieth street. 

Mrs. Ernest Hamilton, formerly beautiful Bessie' 
Poii-all. will be leaving soon for her Montana home, 
after having spent three weeks visiting" het mother, 
Mrs. William H. Bonsall. Several little affairs were 
given in honor of Mrs. Hamilton, who was one of the 
most popular girls in Los Angeles society before her 
marriage. 

The success of Ruth Comfort Mitchell as a sketch 
writer seems assured. Since the performance of the 
last piece she wrote for Lillian Burkhart. "The Lady 
and the Bracelet," she has received several orders 
from professionals. She is working on one now for 
Miss Violet Gillette and George McFall of the Or- 
pheum circuit. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Pixley were the guests of 
honor at a small dinner party given one night this 
week by Mr. and Airs. John Kingsley Macomber, Jr., 
of 1640 West Twenty-third street. 

Mrs. W. A. Clark, wife of the Montana senator, is 
expected in the city on the first of March on a visit to 
her brother-in-law and sister, Mr. and Mrs. Eben S. 



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20 



Pacific Outlook 



Hoyt of Hotel Heinzeman on South Grand avenue. 
Mrs. Clark comes from Paris, where she makes her 
home most of the time, and where she has left her 
two young children, Andrea and Hugette Clark. She 
will spend several months in Los Angeles before re- 
turning to Europe. 

Considerable interest is shown by Pasadena society 
in the news that Whitelaw Reid, ambassador to Great 
Britain, will probably make a visit to the Crown City 
before the season is over. He will be accompanied 
by Mrs. Reid and Miss Jean Reid. They are now 
visiting Mrs. Reid's father, D. O. Mills, at his country 
home at Milbrae, a suburb of San Francisco. 

Miss Laura Grover Smith of West Twenty-fourth 
street entertained at dinner Monday night in honor 
of Stanley Josling, the miniature painter of London. 
Covers were laid for forty. 

Mrs. Benjamin F. Church will give a tea on Tues- 
day afternoon of next week at her' home on South 
Alvarado street, in honor of her daughtetr, Miss 
Mabel Stuart. 

Mrs. Andrew Mullen and her daughter, Miss Marie 
Mullen, entertained with a luncheon at Hotel Holly- 
wood recently in honor of Mrs. Thomas Nelson of 
Chicago. 

Mrs. E. J. Marshall of Westlake avenue gave a 
small dinner party Monday night. 
* * * 

AMONG THE WOMEN'S CLUBS 



Press Club Luncheon 

Successful in every particular was the luncheon 
last Monday of the Woman's Press Club of Southern 
California at Hotel Green, Pasadena. An unusually 
large number of eastern writers and artists were 
among the guests, chief of whom was Frank Pixley, 
the playwright, who made an interesteing after-dinner 
speech, telling his experiences while traveling in the 
Orient. After the social hour that followed the 
luncheon the Press Club and its guests were enter- 
tained at tea by Mrs. G. G. Green and Mrs. J. H. 
Holmes of the hotel, who received in honor of Miss 
Bertha Corbett, the artist, who was also elected an 
honorary member of the Press Club. 

Madame Caroline Severance, Mrs. Elizabeth Boyn- 
ton, Miss Mary Phillips, Mrs. Carrie Jacobs-Bond, 
Miss Bertha Corbett and Miss Alice Rose Eyton, were 
special guests of the club. Others present were: 
Mrs. William N. Fisk, Miss Abbie Seare McHenry, 
Mrs. L. F. Doolittle, Mrs. Myron L. Baldwin, Mrs. 
Leland Norton, Mrs. Jessie M. Reynolds, Mrs. Wil- 
liam F. Serwer, Mrs. George A. Barry, Mrs. Olive 
1'horne Miller, Miss Mary Mann Miller, 
Miss Gertrude P. Daniels, Mrs. Albert Sher- 
man Hoyt, Mrs. Madeline W. Barnes, Mrs. Geor- 
gina S. Townsend, Mrs. Mary M. Bowman, Mrs. W. 
H. Melvin, Mrs. C. M. Galletly, Mrs. Florence Collins 
Porter, Mrs. Charles Willis Snyder, Miss A. B. Mor- 
gan, Miss M. E. Rice, Mrs. Norman Bridge, 
Miss Ada. M. Trotter, Mrs. M. L. Stevens, 
Miss Neally Stevens, Miss G. B. Pierce, Miss 
Kate Robertson of Evanston, 111. ; Miss Sue Ward, 
Mrs. T. B. Wallace, of Tacoma, 111. ; Mrs. C. H. Reid, 
Mrs. M. H. Graham, Mrs. Elizabeth Craib of Oakland, 
Miss Marthine Dietrichsen, Miss Anna B. Oxton, Mrs. 
Bertha Hirsch-Baruch, Mrs. Elizabeth Boynton Har- 
bert, Mrs. L. M. Ridden, Miss Adele M. Roth, Miss 
Ina Goodwin, Mrs. O. H. Goodwin, Mrs. O. H. Bur- 



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Pacific Outlook 



21 



bridge, Mr<. Maud Davis liaker. Mme. Vera de 
Blumenthal, Miss Mary I'liillips, -Mrs. S. D. P. Ran- 
dolph, Mrs. Sarah Ware Whitney. Mrs. X. F. Bridg- 
ham, Mrs. L, s. Ramage, Miss Jessie Washburn, Miss 

I.iia Horlocker, Mr-. S. A. Bowman, Mrs. K. B. Ash- 
ley. Mrs. ( >. N. Williams, Mrs. X. Messer, Mrs. C. B. 

Howell, .Mrs. Harriet Williams Myers. Mrs. Attie A. 

Stone, Mrs. \\'. J. Chambers, Mrs. A. Basley, Miss 
Caroline Crawford Williams. Mrs. W. A. Grant. Miss 
Grace Hortense Tower, Countess Wachmeister, Miss 
1 >. >n>tliy Parry-Jones, Miss Lankershim, .Mrs. John 
W. Mitchell, .Mis^ Rose Ellerbe, Miss Neeta Marquis, 
Mrs. M. W. Hickox, Mrs. Dwight Satterlee, Mrs. 
Isabel 1'.. Winslow, Miss Annette Bogge, Mrs. Mary 
M. Coman, Miss Mattie Laura Jodan, Mrs. Mary 
Stewart Daggett. Mrs. S. Bright Packard. Mrs. Gussie 
I'ackard Dubois. Mrs. Emiie Bauer, Miss Cora B. 
Auten. Mrs. C. II. Reed, Mrs. Ina A. Maul. Mrs. 
Elizabeth T. Wallace. Mrs. James H. Holmes, Mrs. G. 
G. Green. Mrs. S. A. Davis. Mrs. J. N. Ward, Mrs. 
Frank Keener G. mid. Mrs. Belle Angier Burn, Dr. 
Louise Harvey Clark, Mrs. Frederick Immen, Mrs. F. 
A. Miller, Mrs. Xixon Hopkins. Mrs. Idah Meacham 
Strobridge. Mrs. George Drake Ruddy. Mrs. John L. 
Mitchell. Miss Ruth Comfort Mitchell, Miss Lily A. 
Long, Miss Maria Simoni Castello, Miss M. Stowell, 
Mrs. C. R. Mahan, Mrs. Frank Honeywell, Miss 
Georgia B. Chapman and Mrs. Sumner J. Quint. 



Friday Morning 

At their Tuesday afternoon tea this week the 
members of the Friday morning Club were charm- 
ingly entertained with a piano recital given by Herr 
Franz Leischner. Through a misunderstanding as 
to the time, several were late, arriving after the 
programme had commenced and missed part of what 
was one of the most enjoyable afternoons the club 
has had this year. The following numbers com- 
posed the programme : Rondeau by Beethoven in 
G Major ; Chopin studies. Op. 25, No. 23 ; No. 12 in 
C Minor, Berceuse ; Paganini ' Study, Concert 
Etude, D Flat Major, Liszt ; Scene from Lord By- 
ron's "Manfred," Schumann. 

Mrs. Garrett Newkirk of Altadena addressed the 
club Friday on "The Bible as Literature." A Val- 
entine luncheon was served. Next week Mrs. Mer- 
rill Moore Grigg will furnish the prograrrfme, giv- 
ing a reading of Hauptmann's much-discussed 
"Sunken Bell." As there is much interest in Haupt- 
mann and the school of drama he represents, there 
will be no doubt a large attendance. On account 
of the expected crowd, each member will be al- 
lowed to invite but one guest. 



The Ebell 

Dr. H. H. Powers, scholar and traveler, addressed 
the Ebell Monday on "Phidias and the Parthenon," 
illustrating his remarks with stereopticon views. Dr. 
Powers is president of the Bureau of University of 
Travel, Boston, and has held professorships in lead- 
ing American colleges. He is a graduate of Madi- 
son University, Wis., where he was later instructor 
in modern languages. He was professor of Econ- 
omics and Sociology at Smith College and Stanford 
University, and from 1899 to 1902 he was head of 
the department of Social Science at Cornell Univer- 
sity. 

The book review and luncheon took place Wed- 
nesday, when the following works were discussed : 
"Disenchanted," Pierre Loti ; "Lallah Rookh;" 





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Pacific Outlook, 



Thomas Moore ; "Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam" ; "An 
Appreciation,'' B.. R. Baumgardt. Tuesday the mu- 
sic of modern Germany was' studied. Current top- 
ics will be discussed next Monday under the lesder- 
ship of Mrs. J. H. Francis,. Mrs. Chas.E. Curtis 
and Mrs. Eugene T. Pettigrew. Home and foreign 
affairs and the new books will be taken up. 



Mothers' Congress 

Reciprocity Day was observed by the California 
Congress of Mothers in an all-day meeting at Blan- 
chard Hall Wednesday, when addresses were made 
by prominent speakers on the study and training, of 
children. The International Congress of Mothers, 
which convenes in Washington, D. C, in March, was 
also discussed and Mrs. Jefferson D. Gibbs, regent 
of the State congress, who is to be one of the speak- 
ers at the International congress, told of some of 
the plans for that meeting. In addition to Mrs. 
Gibbs the following have been appointed delegates 
from California ; Mrs. Aldelbert S. Abbott, Mrs. D. 
K. Trask,' Mrs. A. Hawkins and Miss Mary Led- 
yard. Tlie last-named was appointed a special dele- 
gate by Gov: Gillett in recognition of her success- 
ful work' among children as a .kindergarten expert. 

Speakers at the Wednesday meeting were: 'Jos- 
eph Scott, Mark Keppel, Mrs. W. W. Murphy, Mrs.- 
Florence Collins Porter, president of the State Fed- 
eration of Women's Clubs, and Mrs. Catherine 
Pierce Wheat, president of the W. C. T. U. 



Women And Trees 

The .annual observance of Arbor Day has come 
to be, a fixed custom with the leading women's or- 
ganizations of the city. This year's celebration, 
which is to take place March 7, — Luther Burbank's 
birthday^wjll be-more largely participated in than 
ever before. Exercises will be held at two points, 
Hazard's reservoir, Boyle Heights, and the Arroyo 
Seco Park. Dr. Lamb, who is an enthusiast on the 
city beautiful movement, was appointed a commit- 
tee of one by the Arbor Commission at a meeting- 
last Monday, to engage speakers to visit the public 
schools and explain the purpose of the annual tree- 
planting. It is Dr. Lamb's idea that this is the' 
best way to reach the parents and interest them. 



Ruskin Art 

Mrs. Jefferson D. Gibbs and Mrs. Henderson Hay- 
ward led in discussion of American etchers at the, 
meeting of the Ruskin Art Club Wednesday. Far- 
rer, the Morans, Parrish, Piatt, Bacher, Coxe and ■ 
Pennell were taken up. Mezzotint will be studied 
next week, Mrs. J. W. Hendrick and Mrs. George 
Hutton leading. 

* * * 
Coronado Tennis Tournament 

The annual tennis tournament of the Coronado 
Country Club will be held under the auspices Of the 
National Lawn Tennis Association at Coronado 
February 19, 20, 21, 22. ! Valuable prizes are to be 
awarded. The men's trophy is now held by T. C. 
Bundy of Los Angeles, and the women's trophy by 
Miss' May Sutton. Hotel del Coronado has made 
special arrangements for the. entertainment of visit- 
ors during the tournament. , . , 
9 * V 
Superlative Deg'ree 

The Foet — To be a poet one must be poor. The 
Editor — Congratulations. You are the poorest poet 
I ever met.— Cleveland Plain Dealer. 



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trip* and you can stop over any place within eight 
days. $2.05 on Sunday, good to return that day. 
Get our free literature describing the "Kite". 

E. W. McGee, 334 So. Spring St. 



Pacific Outlook 



23 



UNDER THE SKYLIGHTS 

Hv Pbrbz Field 

oral miniaturists arc painting at the presem 
time in Los Angeles. Miniature painters of excep- 
tional ability have recently come to the city, and by 
tlu-ir skillful efforts the) have revived an interest in 

this form of art. which was so popular in the past. 
Miniature painting is distinctly a keepsake art. It 
is the m. 'St intimately personal of all forms of por- 
traiture. Before the days of photography it gave a 

lover a semblance of Ins fair one. the rare shape of 
his divinest fancy, and to the sorrowful, an image 
of past joy. However imperfect, a miniature never 
was and never can be an easil) procured counterfeit 
of those we love or honor. It is difficult to do well, 
and costly. Miniatures have the value of all fragile 
things, and must lie preserved with care. Former- 
ly, they were often done on parchment, which has 
the advantage, for the artist, that defects may be 
corrected by being washed out. as water does not 
injure the surface of the skin on which the painting 
is done. Now most of the miniature work is done 
on ivory, which is fragile and easily warps in this 
country if not thoroughly protected from the ex- 
tremes of heat and cold, .as well as from excessive 
moisture in the air. The miniature is placed for 
protection between a glass and a piece of cardboard 
and then carefully bound by leadbeaters skin, which 
precludes the entrance of any dampness. This is 
then inclosed in a metal frame which is supposed 
to be air tight. These frames are frequently high- 
ly jeweled and richly carved, being in themselves 
choice works of art. It is doubtless owing to their 
inherent value that many r portraits have been pre- 
served, thus revealing to us the lineaments of many 
notable people of the past. Modern miniatures are 
nearly always made larger than convenient for car- 
rying about the person and are frequently kept in 
cases hung on the wall, which turns them into curi- 
osities. Sometimes an ivory painting is made so 
large that it is no longer miniature. In olden times 
there was a curious fancy for having the eye alone 
done or even the two eyes. This strange fashion 
was revived in England a few years ago, when dim- 
inutive eyes peeked demurely from many waistcoat 
pockets. Another fad was to ihave a miniature 
made small enough to be worn in a ring. Minia- 
tures are for lovers and for the tender hearted, to 
be worn and cherished in those inner recesses the 
shattering world knows not of. They are dainty 
souvenirs, expressions of those delicate feelings we 
hardly breathe lest, uttered, they disappear. 

We reproduce this week a miniature by H. Stanly 
Josling of the well known tenor, Leo Mars, who was 
in this city last November with Fritzi Seller! and 
who played the part of Gaston in "Mile. Modiste." 
He is now playing in Philadelphia in the same role. 
Mr. Josling has lately finished a portrait of Mrs. 
Randolph H. Miner and of Mrs. Hewlit. Both of 
these works show the artist's skill in seizing the elu- 
sive personalities of pretty women and avoiding the 
simpering look which is too often the just reproach 
of miniature painting. This artist will also paint 
miniatures of Mrs. Wilcox and Mrs. Drake. His 
portrait of Mrs. Laura Chase Smith was a remark- 
able achievement and demonstrates beyond doubt 
the pre-eminent talent of the man. Mr. Josling, 
while in England recently, made a series of minia- 
ture sketches of favorite spots at country homes 
to remind their owners of familiar corners during 
sunlit or twilight hours. This is an extension of the 



field of miniature painting which is original with 
Mr. Josling and which should afford ample scope for 
poetic feeling, a quality with which lie seems to he 
abundantly endowed. Mr. josling has a frank ami 
loyal interest in his work which imparts to it a sin- 
cerity rare in miniature work. A number of orders 
will retain him in the city for several weeks long- 
er. It would he .if interest if a collection of his 
miniatures could lie shown to the public before he 
leaves. 



Another miniature painter has latch come to Los 
Angeles hoping to make it her home. 'Fannie Eve- 
lyn Xule is a New England woman who passed 
three years abroad. She studied with Mine, de 
Billemont-Chardon and Collin in Paris and with 
Larsar in London. She has been successful in 
painting women and children, having lived for near- 
ly a year in Denmark, where she visited from castle 
to castle painting miniatures of the inmates. Miss 
Nute speaks pleasantly of life among the Danes 
and of the many courtesies which she received from 
them. Denmark is a land which is not visited by 
many travelers from this side of the water and 




Miniature of Leo Mars 

Painted here by Stanly Josling of London 

few of those who do go there have the opportuni- 
ties of studying the interior life of the people, a 
chance which the work of Miss Nute afforded her. 
Among the souvenirs of her travels Miss Nute has 
brought back with her a number of ivory paintings, 
studies of the people among whom she lived. These 
include sketches of peasants as well as portraits of 
the people whom she met. Her children are very 
attractive. One miniature of the children of Mrs. 
Kennedy is particularly charming. Although a new- 
comer. Miss Nute has already secured an order for 
some of her work. If possible, she hopes to have 
an exhibition of her miniatures in a local gallery 
within a short time. Every painter of experience 
who comes to Los Angeles adds something to its 
faculty of appreciation for artistic things, raising 
and extending the realm of created beauty. To this 
widening circle we heartily welcome Miss Nute. 

There is still another miniature painter living on 
the East Side. This is Francis R. Hough who 
lives on Hancock street. Miss Harland's miniatures 
are already well known to the frequenters of the 
studios. She exhibited her work in Steckel's gal- 
lery last year. 



An exhibition which w-as arranged for in Blanch- 



24 



Pacific Outlook 



ard hall not having taken place, a few of the 
local painters have hastily gathered together some 
of their newer pictures and hung them in the gal- 
lery, where they may be seen until March first, 
when Elmer Wachtel will exhibit. This collection, 
haphazard as it is, gives one an excellent opportu- 
nity to get an idea of the sort of work that is being 
done in our midst. It is more properly a sale than 
an exhibit, but has the advantage of being unpre- 
meditated. The work of perhaps a dozen painters 
is shown, some finished pictures and some sketches.. 
The methods of work vary from the minute finish of 
the earlier German schools to the surprising results 
of the amateur who is amazed at the action of his 
color, and we may well be astonished at his prom- 
ising audacity, for it never was fear of painting bad- 
ly that produced a great painter. There are in 
the room a number of pictures quite worth while a 
collector's inspection. 

Eugene Frank shows half a dozen paintings of 
the highly finished type. "A Gray Day in Hol- 
land" is done in soft hues, while "Village Black- 
smith" is one of the' quietest and most pleasing of 
this man's work. There are three pictures by J. 
Bond Francisco, one of which, "All In," has been 
seen before. Mrs. C. K. Wright shows some rather 
crude sketches of San Francisco, badly preserving 
the desolation of the earthquake. Mrs. Elizabeth 
Borglum has displayed a number of small sketches 
which are very attractive, one particularly being full 
of a pursuing sunlight, golden and compellingr 

C. P. Neilson of San Diego has one water color 
which is a great improvement over the work which 
he exhibited last year. Miss Nona White has two 
gardens and a floral piece. She has also done ■ a 
magazine cover lately which is an unusually good 
piece of work. Miss Sheldon has some water col- 
ors on view which look like architectural back- 
grounds. There is a street scene by Miss Harland 
skillfully manipulated except for the roadway, 
which seems about to earthquake, if there be such 
a verb. Joseph Greenbaum also has a portrait, re- 
cently finished, as well as an ideal head. In an ad- 
joining room are some photographs made by Marion 
Lehmann. She is very skillful in her posing, a 
standing figure of a girl being exceptionally well 
done. In these days photography is truly becoming 
almost one of the fine arts. 



A correspondent in Leipsic writes a Berlin news- 
paper that the Royal Academy for the Graphic Arts 
has offered prizes for artistic visiting cards. Cham- 
pagne labels are known to have been used 
on visiting cards in this state, a quite charming lo- 
cal idiosyncrasy. If one might fit the design to the 
character, who could escape an ass's head on his 
escutcheon? The correspondent says: "This opens 
a new field for artists, and its development will be 
followed with interest. Visiting cards, except for 
style of type and size, are always the same. In 
every country certain peculiarities may be observed, 
but a card is a card. Now, under the protection of 
the Crown Princess Cecilie and the Princess Johann 
George of Sachsen, there may be a change. The ar- 
tistic visiting card may become the companion of 
the book plate, and the exhibition which will result 
from the Leipsic offer may furnish as much in- 
teresting material as an ex-libis display. An illusr 
trated visiting card ! It will in some instances make 
the note of introduction unnecessary." 




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Pacific Outlook 



25 



Art Briefs 
Exhibitions next week: Steckel's gallery, J. I'.. 
McBurney, oils: Margaret Patterson, watercolors; 
Nickelson's gallery, I'asatlena, Mrs. E. Land 
Harris; Friday Morning Club, Tuesday, Norman St. 
Clair. 

Benjamin C. Brown will hold an exhibition in 
Bentz gallery in Pasadena in a fortnight, Ik- has 
been delayed getting hi- w>rk together l.\ sickness 
in his family. 

II. J. liiemr of Santa Barbara, who passes most 

of his lime on this coast, was in Los Angeles last 
week. His paintings are better known in the East 
than in this part of the world; although he does 
much of his work here. 

Rob Wagner is busy preparing for the Moral 
Festival in Santa Barbara which takes place next 
month. Nevertheless he lincls lime to paint and 
has just completed a three-quarters length portrait 
of Mr. Orena, which is said to be very good. 

* * * 

Most Complete Rain Chart 
A ehart showing the rainfall in Southern Cali- 
fornia each year for the past twenty-six years, and 
including the present season up to February 1, has 
been issued by the Security Savings Bank. Copies 
of this valuable record may be had by application 
at the bank. 

* * * 
As Per Bill 

"Now," said the physician, "you will have to eat 
plain food and not stay out late at night." "Yes," 
replied the patient, "that is what I have been think- 
ing ever since you sent in your bill." — The Catholic 
News. 

* * * 
Annoying Lach 

Mayor — Where are you going? Village Con- 
stable — The three tramps I just locked up want to. 
play whist and I'm looking for a fourth ! — Fliegende 
Blatter. 

* * * 

The Accursed Tip 
Old Lady (seeing a friend off on steamship) — 
Now do be careful, dear, and don't forget to give 
the captain a shilling to keep off the rocks. — Punch. 

* * * 
Dawson's BooKshop 

Less than three years ago Ernest Dawson, with 
but a few hundred volumes, opened a book store 
at 713 S. Broadway. A specialty being made of 
good books, second-hand books, old and rare vol- 
umes. Business grew rapidly and about a year ago 
H. W. Collins, who for seventeen years was in a 
London Bookshop, was taken into the business. 
Growing trade demanded a larger and better loca- 
tion, and recently the store was moved to 518 S. 
Hill street, where the stock can be shown to bet- 
ter advantage. 

It is significant that they were the first and up to 
the present time are the only book store in Los An- 
geles to issue catalogues of old, rare and standard 
books. Catalogues will be mailed free upon re- 
quest. 

Inspection is invited of what is probably the fin- 
est collection of scarce and out of print books for 
sale on the Coast. 

The new store is located at 518 S. Hill street, un- 
der the Portsmouth hotel, opposite Central Park. — 
ADV. 




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26 



Pacific Outlook 




time with 
it 3 but not 
The pro- 
mysterious 



The Symphony Concert 

The fourth concert of the Los Angeles Symphony 
Orchestra took place Friday afternoon, February 7, 
at the Auditorium, under the direction of Harley 
Hamilton. The programme was very tastefully ar- 
ranged but less tastefully executed. The Saracen 
suite by McDowell, one of his best compositions, 
was rather poorly rendered. The first part of the 
suite was taken in too slow a tempo and was lack- 
ing in dash and temperament. 

His second part, "The Beautiful Alda," was 
dragged and interpreted without the real spirit and 
charm it demands. Mr. Hamilton should try to 
control more the first violins and not allow them 
to drown the motive or melody when they are the 
accompanying organ. 

In the Saracen suite the violins overpowered most 
of the time the motive of the violas, and the same 
damage was done to the 'celli. 

The horn players had rather a hard 
the same suite and were mysterious in 
in the sense of the composer's idea, 
gramme writer speaks of "the soft and 
motive of the horns," and then he says, in explain 
ing a musical phrase, "and then, most beautiful of 
all, the horn passage suddenly breaks into, etc., 
etc." They surely broke in, and it was so sudden 
that the}' each broke in in a different key. 

Many good phrases and motives and melodies 
have been spoiled by the horn players throughout 
the concerts of the Los Angeles Symphony Orches- 
tra, and so special attention should be paid to 
them by the leader, to avoid accidents which are of 
great annoyance. 

With Beethoven's Eighth Symphony in F major 
Mr. Hamilton was more successful and performed 
it in a very acceptable manner. The Allegretto 
Scherzando was the most enjoyable part of it, and 
was much appreciated. 

The soloist of the concert was Arnold Krauss, the 
concert master of the Symphony. Mr. Krauss 
played the Scotch Fantasie by Max Bruch with good 
phrasing and intelligent interpretation. His occa- 
sional misunderstanding with the pitch may be eas- 
ily overlooked, as the whole was a remarkable per- 
formance. 

Mr. Krauss proved the most acceptable soloist of 
the season so far and certainly earned success and 
appreciation. 

VERO. 



An American Fault 

The dramatic reviewer of one of the popular mag- 
azines says, in the current issue, in a reference to 
an actress chosen for the leading female part in a 
prominent New York production : "She has ab- 
solutely no variety in her inflections, and was evi- 
dently selected for the part because she looked it — 
a tendency that is doing more to retard the advance 



of dramatic art in America than any other one 
thing. Supple muscles may enable one to sit cross- 
legged on a couch, for instance, but they are not a 
sufficient dramatic equipment for a star, even when 
coupled with large eyes." 

This is a point well taken. The general American 
public fails too often to discriminate between real 
dramatic art and mere sensual appeal through the 
eyes. Physical aptness for a part combined with 
the artistic spirit is undeniably the all-powerful 
and much-to-be-desired combination, but where a 
choice is to be made — as it usually must be — be- 
tween the real artist and the mere model, it is the 
artist who must be considered first. She who is 
inherently a dramatic artist can overcome any rea- 
sonable physical defects by her art and her per- 
sonality ; she can make herself grow beautiful right 
under your skeptical eyes through the wonderful 
alchemy of a combined temperament and intelli- 
gence. The average American is not, we fear, suf- 
ficiently sensitive to this subtle differentiation be- 
tween the body and the spirit in affairs of art. 



Those who have not seen "The Energetic Mr. 
West" at the Belasco this week have missed three 
unusually pleasing bits of acting — the Percival West 
of John Daly Murphy, the Bill Sanderson, "sheriff 
of Spread Eagle," of Hobart Bosworth, and the 
Sam Lee, "a Chinaman," of Harry Earl. O me, 
O my, that Chink — what celestial drollery this fel- 
low Earl does put into the imitation Mongolian's 
few words and many steps ! We confess to no fur- 
ther knowledge of this actor Earl than a memory 
that he played a small part indifferently in the 
previous week's production, but he is worth the 
while this time, simple though his part be. He has 
not overlooked even the detail of holding the cigar- 
ette in the Chinese fashion ; and we could suggest 
only that, to perfect his detail throughout, he as- 
sume the characteristic Chinese squat instead of the 
reclining position characteristic of the white man, in 
the scene where he loafs about the campfire. Oth- 
erwise the work is clever — a bit overdone here and 
there, but not enough to burlesque it. 

And Big Bill Sanderson — a straight-from-the- 
shoulder Westerner with a rough exterior and a 
refined heart — it's a simple part, too; nothing much 
to it, really, yet Bosworth handles it with a deli- 
cacy that makes the character full of human ap- 
peal. As for the Percival West part, there's little 
to it, either ; still, it is unmistakably entertaining 
as interpreted by the almost' vexatiously prepos- 
sessed Murphy. It is this trio of players that stands 
out distinctly in this production ; although the Bonny 
Sanderson of Dot Bernard is worthy of compliment. 

As a play, "The Energetic Mr. West," by Edgar 
Selwyn, is a product that might very easily, when 
less intelligently handled than it is by the Belasco 
company under the stage direction of Bosworth, 



Pacific Outlook 



27 



nd into the hi ottt-and-out melodrama. 

A- i! is, tln-rc are perilously Sensational moments 
now and then that are beyond the taming even of 
the most conservative organisation, such, fur in- 
stance, as the artificial thrill producers that are 
resorted to in that beautifully staged mountain 
scene, which shows the "Bear (.'reek Claim.*' And 
Mann Rogers's sudden hike to Hear Creek along 

with a lot of rough miners who stampede to the 

new "find," deserting her hotel at Spread Eagle 
and camping out with the motley crew, "the only 
woman in the crowd. i> decidedly far-fetched. 

Bui the play is one thai can hardly fail to please 
the general public ; and it is refined down in the 
current production to a point where, as a whole, 
it gives an unusually pleasant impression. There 
are some nice touches in the last act where lovable 
but uncity-broke Hill Sanderson and his daughter 
Bonny, a sweet, wild mountain daisy of a lass, are 
shown at a cruel disadvantage in the sumptuous 
apartment of a Xew York hotel, where they are 
mortified by the gibes of some social hypocrites. 
Little Miss Bernard is seen to particular advan- 
tage in the more subtle passages. of this scene; and 
the peculiar ease with which the susceptibilities of 
the average person are overwrought and distorted 
by melodramatic excitements and comic appeal is 
to be noted here, when a proportion of the audi- 
ence breaks into laughter at the very prettily path- 
etic moment in which the humor of the situation is 
suddenly quenched by the dropping of a chance re- 
mark among the strangers who surround her which 
opens the eyes of the simple, trusting little moun- 
tain girl to the unguessed fact that the young New 
Yorker whom she has learned to love has all this 
time been engaged to one of these very society 
frostbites who have just taken pleasure in snubbing 
her. The little girl's face turns in a flash from the 
look of flushed pleasure over her newly bought hats 
to blank amazement, then acute pain, then bitter- 
ness ; she trembles and sags like a blasted reed and 
her amusing armload of hat boxes goes tumbling 
from her wilted arms to the floor, and big Bill Sand- 
erson, her dad, quivers, too — and a merry ripple of 
laughter runs from pit to gallery before the real 
meaning of the moment can reach out and stifle it. 
Almost all through the play Bonny has been doing 
amusing things, and the change of sentiment is too 
sudden — even though the whole power of the touch- 
lies in its suddenness — instantly to check the mo- 
mentum of laughter. Queer, how the habit of a 
certain attitude toward some certain character gets 
hold of an audience, and how distinct a blow must 
be given to break that hold. 

George Barnum is pleasing, as ever, in the role 
of Hiram West, father of the energetic Mr. West, 
and Harry Glazier and Howard Scott are good in 
the parts respectively, of Happy Stokes, "an ad- 
venturous prospector," and Peaceful, "a miner." 
Celia Sinclair, the New York fiancee of Percival 
West, is impersonated by Florence Smythe and 
Marm Rogers of the Spread Eagle hotel is pleasing- 
ly done by Adele Harrington. 

' A realistic incident of the first act is the intro- 
duction of a genuine Japanese in the role of a 
house servant. This Mr. T. Fuji has a number 
of lines to speak, and struggles through them with 
valiant determinate m. 



The AUDITORIUM * p ™ K ^J^«h^™" 

"Theatre Beautiful" 

Week o( February 17. Matinees Wednesday and 
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The FERRIS STOCK COMPANY 

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in ;i drama of MARIE CORELLI'S gri at 

play of the far north f 

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A magnificent production of a thrilling love play 

Prices: 10. 25, 35 and 50 cents. Matinees: 10 and 25 cents 

Phones: F 2367, Main 5186 

Next week, "F.AGI.E TAVBRN" by Gertrude 
Nelson Andrews. 



SIMPSON AUDITORIUM L e m™ er 

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Fritz Kreisler 

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ONE NIGHT ONLY— FRIDAY, MARCH 6 

Seat sale now on at the Bartlett Co., opposite City 
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431 W. 5th St. 



28 



Pacific Outlook 



faults of playwrights and actors, ought to turn down 
his thumbs on the average "rural" drama and its pot- 
pourri of love and hate and tragedy and comedy and 
pathos and farce and whatnot else of human — or in- 
human — emotions. But, after -all, the average sort of 
"rural" drama gets down pretty "durn" close to about 
as real life as is lived — the unfalsified, even if some- 
times overly sentimentalized, life of country folk ; and 
we plead guilty to a hearty enjoyment of the mixture 
now and then, however inartistic this confession may 
make us appear. 

There has been a pleasant example of the "rural" 
at the Burbank this week— "Home Folks," it's called. 
They're there, right at home, and they take you with 
them to the old familiar scenes in spite of your possible 
reluctance to yield to the simple expedients of the plot. 
"Home Folks" is not a crowning triumph of the play- 
wright's art, any more than are the rest of its kind ; 
but there is lots of genuine, unforced fun and a deal of 
wholesomeness in the rollicking children, the pranks of 
the boys ,down at the old swimming hole, the village 
characters and their intrigues, the countryside picnic 
grounds, the noisy brass band and the ultimate vic- 
tory of the honest farmer lad over the city-trained vil- 
lain. It's all much more human than most of the 
studied high-art drama. 

Henry Stockbridge is the joy of the Burbank com- 
pany in an affair like "Home Folks" ; his acting in a 
, role like Joe Hawkins, "fit only to fiddle and fish," has 
no semblance .of acting — it is just being the fellow 
himself. John W. Burton, as old Nat Niles, "the 
richest man in Red Oak township," Willis Marks as 
Si Heckle, "storekeeper and postmaster at Red Oak," 
and H. J. Ginn as Squire Andrews, "Justice of the 
Peace," are noticeably good in this production. Louise 
Royce in the part of Mrs. Martha Selby is another 
brig'ht spot in the week's cast. William Desmond 
plays the hero, of course, and Blanche Hall the hero- 
ine, though her role of Ruth Clayton does not amount 
to much. The Burbank management has been very 
fortunate of late in its judgment of the wants of its 
clientele, and full houses have been the rule there. 



in whom Sarah Bernhardt takes such great interest 
of late that the two have been almost inseparable. 



One of the scenically effective and luridly excit- 
ing melodramas which the Ferris management so 
well knows how to stage has, held the attention of 
the Auditorium audiences during the week. The 
piece is called "Under the Polar Star," and such 
as it is, it is successfully handled by Miss Stone and 
the Ferris players. 

L. B. 



"Camille" in Japan 

Mme. Sarah Bernhardt says she has definitely 
made up her mind to pay a visit to the empire of 
the Mikado this summer and is looking forward 
to the trip with great pleasure. 

"It will really be my first pleasure trip," she said 
to an interviewer the other day, "for whenever I 
have been traveling before it has always been be- 
cause I h'ad to make money, and then half the 
pleasure is gone, no matter how much you may 
love your work. 

"Of course," she added, with a smile, "if the lit- 
tle brown people insist, I may play once or twice 
at Tokio, and if I do I shall play 'La Dame aux 
Camelias' (Camille), for I think they will under- 
stand that play better than anything else, at least 
that is what Sada Yacco says." 

Sada Yacco is the little clever Japanese actress 



Theater Items 

, "THELMA," which Ferris will put on next week 
at the Auditorium, is a dramatization of Marie 
Corelli's novel of that name, and is a tale of Nor- 
way. The story is laid in the Land of the Mid- 
night Sun, and the characters are picturesque and 
unusual. It is said that the scenery will be espe- 
cially fine. A special force of artists has been 
creating this scenery, and the promise is for a ser- 
ies of stage pictures of marvelous beauty. Miss 
Florence Stone will portray the name part, which 
is a favorite role of tier's. Florence Barker will ap- 
pear as a Swedish girl. Norwegian costumes will 
be featured. 

In Munsey's for February is reproduced a pic- 
ture of Pearl Landers, who is referred to as having 
created the part of Chrissy Heath in the New York 
production of "The Coming of Mrs. Patrick." Miss 
Landers is a "graduate" of the Burbank Theater in 
this city where, in the early part of her professional 
career, she played' herself into popularity with the